A potentially life-saving cancer drug developed in Oklahoma

A potentially life-saving new drug for cancer patients has been developed in Oklahoma. The drug is now approved by the Food and Drug Administration for a human trial taking place at the Stevenson Cancer Center. The drug, called OK-1, has been in the works for more than 25 years, developed by a researcher at UO College of Medicine. And something like that can impact Oklahoma, but it can also impact the world,” said Dr. Doris Benbrook, the creator of OK-1. Benbrook said the drug is designed to treat cancer without dangerous side effects.” We’re very hopeful that it won’t harm patients, it won’t cause side effects,” Benbrook said. For now, the drug is given to women with advanced stage ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer. Once, a cancer patient, who is currently undergoing another clinical trial at OU, said that these trials save lives. patient in a separate study. The drug will be delivered in capsule form, and Benbrook said it may even have the ability to prevent cancer.

A potentially life-saving new drug for cancer patients has been developed in Oklahoma.

The drug is now approved by the Food and Drug Administration for a human trial taking place at the Stevenson Cancer Center.

The drug, called OK-1, has been in the works for more than 25 years, developed by a researcher at the OU College of Medicine.

“It’s so meaningful to be able to take on your life’s work and know that you’ve had an impact. And something like that can impact Oklahoma, but it can also impact the world,” said Dr. Doris Benbrook, the creator of OK. -1.

Benbrook said the drug is designed to treat cancer without dangerous side effects.

“We’re very hopeful that it won’t harm patients, it won’t cause side effects,” Benbrook said.

For now, the drug is given to women with advanced stage ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer. Once, a cancer patient, who is currently undergoing another clinical trial at UO, said that these trials save lives.

“Even if it doesn’t help the individual…you are still collectively helping other people,” said Dena Nowlun, a clinical trial patient in a separate study.

The drug will be delivered in capsule form, and Benbrook said it may even have the potential to prevent cancer.

Comments are closed.