Cancer patient – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:20:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer patient – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Health First patient parks bike and drives with ‘guardian angel’ for treatments at Cancer Institute https://parentraide-cancer.org/health-first-patient-parks-bike-and-drives-with-guardian-angel-for-treatments-at-cancer-institute/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:20:12 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/health-first-patient-parks-bike-and-drives-with-guardian-angel-for-treatments-at-cancer-institute/ cancer treatment appointments took about two and a half hours on the bike each way Travel to and from Health First’s Cancer Institute on Melbourne’s Hickory Street has become routine for Bryan Marcrum. Without a car (or family or close friends nearby), his appointments took about two and a half hours by bike each way. […]]]>

cancer treatment appointments took about two and a half hours on the bike each way

Travel to and from Health First’s Cancer Institute on Melbourne’s Hickory Street has become routine for Bryan Marcrum. Without a car (or family or close friends nearby), his appointments took about two and a half hours by bike each way. (picture Health First)

Giving Tuesday funds life-saving connections, eternal gratitude.

BREVARD COUNTY, FL – If looks could kill,” Bryan Marcrum said, recalling the look Health First oncologist Lauren Kropp, MD, shot him when he told her he was doing cycled from Palm Bay to make appointments at the Health First Cancer Institute in Melbourne.

“She said, ‘What are you doing?’ I said, “I’ve been doing this for 20 years,” but yeah, I finally got to the point where I need help, and she was like, “Well, we don’t have that .”

Earlier this year, Brian had sharp pains under his stomach that felt like a bladder infection. He went to the emergency department at Holmes Regional Medical Center at Health First. Later, he was given a startling diagnosis: stage 3 colon cancer.

Travel to and from the Health First’s Cancer Institute on Hickory Street in Melbourne has become routine. Without a car (or family or close friends nearby), his appointments took about two and a half hours by bike each way. At first they were manageable, he says, but lately he’s been losing his strength and suffering from neuropathy in his extremities.

Health First radiation oncologist Lauren Kropp, MD, in front of the TrueBeam radiation therapy system. (picture Health First)

Benevolence and guardian angels

Health First is Brevard County’s not-for-profit health care system. Donations and community donations contribute to technology, programs and clinicians that raise the standard of care for all.

The Compassionate Fund is a big part of that. It provides eligible patients with the assistance they need in the form of a Guardian Angel Grant — an anonymous arrangement that can help with transportation like Bryan’s, prescriptions — even accessibility issues at the patient’s home.

Health First Case Managers, Social Workers and Benefits Advocates obtain Guardian Angel Grants for eligible patients in need. Often a journey to medical treatment or equipment will create a tangible and lasting impact for a member of our community. It might even save their lives.

“Health First is Brevard County’s not-for-profit health care system. This means that we spend a lot of time answering two questions. How can we attract more and more innovation and innovators to our doorsteps so that patients receive world-class care? It’s a.
Second, how can we better care for the patients who come through our doors, because that’s how we measure value,” said Michael Seeley, president of the Health First Foundation.

MICHAEL SEELEY, above, is the chairman of the Health First Foundation, which helps improve the health and well-being of residents in the community by raising funds to support and advance the mission of Health First and his family charitable health care providers. (picture Health First)

“You are alone” is no longer

At the Health First Cancer Institute, “I felt like I had a whole team supporting me and fighting for me. I wasn’t used to that,” Bryan said.

Thanks to the Guardian Angel fund, Bryan now uses ride-sharing service Lyft to get to and from his appointments.
Transportation is a major barrier for patients across a range of services at Health First offices, and supporters of the Compassionate Fund will help people overcome this barrier.

Because not moving shouldn’t stop you from fighting cancer.

Health First patient Bryan Marcrum is being treated at the Cancer Institute at 1130 Hickory Street in Melbourne. (picture Health First)

“I am grateful for each day the patient presents and receives their treatment and continues to make positive progress,” said
Jordan Hearn, a patient coordinator at the institute who helped match Bryan with Guardian Angels.

Bryan did not miss any treatment. He is proud of it. Now he is nearing the end of his radiotherapy program. “Fingers crossed,” he said.

“In my life, when something bad happened, it’s always, you’re all alone. Understand that. It’s a whole new experience for me. It’s good to know that there is people supporting you, caring for you even if they don’t know you, it’s a great feeling.

With your help, the Compassionate Fund will continue to advance the health and well-being of our neighbours.

Be part of the global Giving Tuesday experience, visit HF.org/GivingTuesday, email foundation@hf.org or call 321.434.7353.

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Kenyan salon owner warms hearts after giving cancer patient a makeover: ‘Feel Like Queen’ https://parentraide-cancer.org/kenyan-salon-owner-warms-hearts-after-giving-cancer-patient-a-makeover-feel-like-queen/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 08:54:14 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/kenyan-salon-owner-warms-hearts-after-giving-cancer-patient-a-makeover-feel-like-queen/ Liz was diagnosed with cancer shortly after the burial of her grandmother, who was her only surviving relative Usikimye founder Njeri wa Migwi took care of her while she studied at KCA University, where she received a scholarship for getting an A in KCSE. Everything was fine until she was recently put back on chemotherapy […]]]>
  • Liz was diagnosed with cancer shortly after the burial of her grandmother, who was her only surviving relative
  • Usikimye founder Njeri wa Migwi took care of her while she studied at KCA University, where she received a scholarship for getting an A in KCSE.
  • Everything was fine until she was recently put back on chemotherapy when her cancer returned and she lost her hair.

Some of the most difficult side effects of cancer treatments may not cause physical pain. They may not cause fatigue or digestive issues. And they may only be temporary.

But for some cancer patients, hair loss can be one of the most distressing side effects of cancer treatment. Hair loss makes one feel vulnerable, embarrassed and exposed as a cancer patient.

For this reason, Usikimye founder and human rights activist, Njeri wa Migwi, took the initiative to ensure that a young girl diagnosed with cancer regains her confidence.

Read also

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Liz has suffered a lot of stigma due to hair loss. The young girl has been in Migwi’s care since she finished fourth grade after losing her grandmother, who was her only living survivor.

After getting an A in her KCSE exams, she was offered a scholarship by the Kenya University of Chartered Accountants (KCA), where she studied while undergoing treatment.

“Everything was fine until the cancer came back with a vengeance last month. She had to start chemo again, and unfortunately she lost all her hair last week,” Migwi wrote.

PAY ATTENTION: Discover the news that are chosen exactly for YOU ➡ find the “Recommended for you” block on the homepage and enjoy!

Liz is battling cancer
Photo collage of Liza after getting a fabulous makeover after losing her hair due to cancer treatment. Photo: Diana Aketch.
Source: Facebook

Splendid makeover

“She just called me crying because her classmates made fun of her. Today my heart is broken kabisa. My daughter probably needs a wig to feel like a person,” he said. -she adds.

Read also

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To find a solution to the problem, Diana Akech of Dee’s Hair and Beauty Saloon called Migwi, asking her what she wanted for her birthday, and she immediately replied: “a wig for Liz”.

Aketch had Migwi take Liz to her salon to get fitted with a wig immediately, and true to her words, she gave Liz a fabulous makeover.

“Njeri Wa Migwi, I would like to thank you for giving me the opportunity to meet Liz for a fabulous makeover at Dee Hair & Beauty Salon,” she captioned photos of a gorgeous Liz.

“Liz was diagnosed with cancer and suffered a lot from stigma and hair loss. I’m glad we had the chance to make her smile and feel like the queen she is,” she added.

Kenyans affected

Aketch has since warmed the hearts of many Kenyans for helping restore Liz’s confidence.

Read also

Christine Mugambi: 7 stunning photos of a handsome cop who helped a man after he was robbed

Njeri wa Migwi wrote:

“Dee sent me this video, when I tell you I cried after the makeover, I walked in, and you could see how radiant and happy Liz was. Joy is a beautiful thing, and I I celebrate all the victories.”

Teresa Anyango said:

“Thank you, Dee for the blessings you convey. May you be blessed.”

Wairimu Ndung’u sent a message of encouragement:

“She’s beautiful. Diana Akech, please tell her to keep fighting! Because she can and will beat cancer!”

Evon Atieno Ogal Akech encouraged:

“She is beautiful even without it. I know what she goes through when a woman loses her hair due to illness. On the other hand, God makes one look at oneself a whole deeper than what is outside is beautiful. God bless the work of your hands.

BossyLady Accessoria wrote:

“This is catwalk material, so beautiful. Thank you, Dee, and thank you, Njeri! Your duo are doing an amazing job!”

PAY ATTENTION: check the news exactly for you ➡ find the “Recommended for you” block and enjoy!

Source: TUKO.co.ke

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Racial disparities persist in access to ovarian cancer care https://parentraide-cancer.org/racial-disparities-persist-in-access-to-ovarian-cancer-care/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:02:09 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/racial-disparities-persist-in-access-to-ovarian-cancer-care/ Most people with ovarian cancer don’t receive recommended treatments to give them the best possible survival outcomes, and the odds are even lower when patients are black, a new study finds. Disparities in ovarian cancer treatment have persisted for years, caused in part by issues of access and affordability. But even after taking these factors […]]]>

Most people with ovarian cancer don’t receive recommended treatments to give them the best possible survival outcomes, and the odds are even lower when patients are black, a new study finds.

Disparities in ovarian cancer treatment have persisted for years, caused in part by issues of access and affordability. But even after taking these factors into account, the new study found that black patients were 14% less likely than white patients to receive all of the treatments recommended for ovarian cancer by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). (PDF).

“While the ability to pay and the number of hospitals and specialists in the area impact a patient’s cancer care, these do not fully explain racial disparities in breast cancer treatment. ovary,” said study lead author Mary Katherine Montes of Oca, MD, of Duke University School. of medicine, said in a statement.

Treatment guidelines for ovarian cancer usually involve a combination of surgery and chemotherapy and vary depending on what is called the stage of the tumor or how advanced and aggressive the cancer is. at diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society. Staging takes into account the size of tumors and their spread to surrounding organs, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body.

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Adopt regular mammography for early detection of breast cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/adopt-regular-mammography-for-early-detection-of-breast-cancer/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 21:00:07 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/adopt-regular-mammography-for-early-detection-of-breast-cancer/ Mammography device. [iStockphoto] “I need you to get this scanner from the county referral hospital,” I told him after the exam. “It’s called a mammogram. We don’t have one at this facility.” It was the season. I had just seen a male patient with a rare type of breast cancer a week earlier. Diseases arrive […]]]>
Mammography device. [iStockphoto]

“I need you to get this scanner from the county referral hospital,” I told him after the exam. “It’s called a mammogram. We don’t have one at this facility.” It was the season. I had just seen a male patient with a rare type of breast cancer a week earlier. Diseases arrive in battalions; we say. For this male, I had had a long conversation about the scanner with my colleague who graciously co-wrote this piece.

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and represents one in eight cancers worldwide. Experts predict that the number of new cases per year will increase by 40% by 2040. Regardless of cancer type or setting, it is important to note that the only determinant of outcome is the stage at which a patient with cancer cancer presents itself. It is therefore important that as many, if not all, cancers as possible are selected at an early stage to give patients a chance of a cure. This is done by screening.

In breast cancer screening, mammography is one of the recommended screening exams for women over 40. This is an x-ray target on the breasts to detect any precancerous changes before they can be discerned by the hand or eye. Since its invention more than a century ago, the adoption of mammography has been shown to reduce cancer-related mortality by more than 30%. Thus, various cancer treatment guidelines will advise mammography and breast examination as screening strategies to detect breast cancer at an early stage.

The main use of mammography is for early detection. Very small masses or clusters of microcalcifications (early warning changes). They would not be seen on clinical examination by the doctor by ultrasound. Subtle density changes are also suspicious on a follow-up mammogram. Otherwise, they would be adopted normally. The use of mammography is however limited in young people with dense breasts and as such not recommended for women under 40 years of age.

Our anecdotal observation locally is that mammography machines are not as widely purchased and installed in our healthcare facilities as other scanners.

“It will take you 22 years to make a mammography business profitable in Kenya,” according to projections by Africa Telerad. Africa Telerad is a teleradiology company that provides radiology reporting (for CT, MRI, Ultrasound, Mammography, X-Ray) and image archiving and storage to over 100 hospitals across Africa.

This is quite a significant reach and the commercial projection, while economically sensible, does not bode well for cancer care in Kenya. Kenyans are clearly not big consumers of mammography services. Whether that’s because health care providers don’t recommend or people don’t recover is a point of discussion. What is beyond doubt is that a quarter of all cancers among women in Kenya are breast cancers. Even when you group men and women together and count the cancers, breast cancer remains in pole position in 16 out of 100 people.

Although our observations still lack solid scientific data, the enormity of the burden of breast cancer suggests that all available resources should be devoted to it. Certainly, health-seeking culture and behavior will strongly influence the uptake of any medical intervention made available. But Cancer doesn’t seem to respect cultural inclinations at all. The anecdotal observation of Africa Telerad in other countries, particularly in West Africa, points to a systemic push by regulatory and insurance players to regularly consume these services. For example, there is a country with a police force that pays female personnel to have mammograms every year where indicated.

Kenya does not have the culture of mammography. Even national referral hospitals would need greater use of this service. The national government, under the Managed Equipment Service (MES) project, has installed several mammography machines in various county hospitals. Adoption has been low.

As the new government settles in and revamps the National Health Insurance Fund as promised, perhaps capturing mammography as a benefit for all executives will increase uptake. There also needs to be a sustained campaign to make breast education and mammography happen all year round, not just in October.

-Dr Stanley Aruyaru is a consultant general surgeon and author

-Dr Jocelyn Nyokabi is consultant radiologist and co-founder, Africa Telerad

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Red Cross donates SDP to cancer patient « Khabarhub https://parentraide-cancer.org/red-cross-donates-sdp-to-cancer-patient-khabarhub/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 09:02:22 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/red-cross-donates-sdp-to-cancer-patient-khabarhub/ Red Cross donates PPS to cancer patient Image for Representation/Building of the Nepal Red Cross Society in Kathmandu. KATHMANDU: The Central Blood Transfusion Service of the Nepal Red Cross has provided single donor platelets (PSD) free of charge to Aashish Acharya, who is fighting against cancer. Red Cross Executive Director Umesh Dhakal and Transfusion Service […]]]>

Red Cross donates PPS to cancer patient

Red Cross donates PPS to cancer patient

Image for Representation/Building of the Nepal Red Cross Society in Kathmandu.

KATHMANDU: The Central Blood Transfusion Service of the Nepal Red Cross has provided single donor platelets (PSD) free of charge to Aashish Acharya, who is fighting against cancer.

Red Cross Executive Director Umesh Dhakal and Transfusion Service Director Dibyaraj Paudel visited Nepal Cancer Hospital, Harisiddhi and handed over the platelets worth Rs 25 000 to Aashish’s parents.

The director of the hospital, Swarupa Shrestha, helped the Red Cross to provide blood to cancer patient Aashish.

“We took the son to the Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Center in India, where his bone marrow was transplanted. Following this, problems occurred frequently. Here at the cancer hospital in Nepal, she needs a lot of platelets. It is like a blessing to us that the Red Cross is providing free platelets at a time when cells are scarce,” said Keshab, Aashish’s father.

The Red Cross has ramped up the production of SDPs by apheresis following the rise in dengue fever cases, Paudel said.

The service is available in a few parts of the country and the technology is expensive, he added.

Dengue fever and cancer patients mainly need PPS. Thus, federal and local government aid should provide SDPs at concessional rates, he said.

According to doctors, SDPs are more powerful than Random Donor Platelets (RDPs). One unit of SDP is equivalent to 6 to 8 units of RDP.

SDPs that are collected by a more efficient component separation system are less likely to carry other components like red blood cells.

Thus, they are available to be transfused to a patient of any blood type.

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Cancer patients with weakened immune systems are at high risk of severe COVID if treated with systemic drug therapies, study finds – ScienceDaily https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-patients-with-weakened-immune-systems-are-at-high-risk-of-severe-covid-if-treated-with-systemic-drug-therapies-study-finds-sciencedaily/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 22:21:44 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-patients-with-weakened-immune-systems-are-at-high-risk-of-severe-covid-if-treated-with-systemic-drug-therapies-study-finds-sciencedaily/ Cancer patients with weakened immune systems who are treated with immunotherapies tend to fare significantly worse from COVID-19 than those who have not received such treatments in the three months prior to their diagnosis of COVID, show the results of a new study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and across the United States, […]]]>

Cancer patients with weakened immune systems who are treated with immunotherapies tend to fare significantly worse from COVID-19 than those who have not received such treatments in the three months prior to their diagnosis of COVID, show the results of a new study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and across the United States, Canada and Mexico. Researchers have found worse outcomes in the disease itself as well as the ferocious immune response that sometimes accompanies it.

The study, posted online today by the journal JAMA Oncologyalso found that immunocompromised patients treated with drug agents other than immunotherapies had more severe COVID than untreated patients, but not to the same degree as those receiving immunotherapy.

On the positive side, the researchers found that patients treated with immunotherapies — but whose immune systems were healthy — fared no worse from COVID than untreated patients.

The findings suggest that immunocompromised cancer patients should take particular care to avoid COVID and, if they do contract the disease, should be aggressive in seeking treatment, the study authors said. However, patients whose immune system has not been suppressed can safely receive cancer therapies – immunotherapies or drug agents – without being at additional risk of COVID-19.

“It is well established that COVID-19 disproportionately affects cancer patients, and there is evidence that patients treated with certain types of systemic therapies – which suppress the immune system – often have worse outcomes,” said Toni Choueiri, MD, director of the Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber, co-lead author of the study. “This study was done to find out which patients are most at risk of adverse effects. We looked specifically at patients treated with immunotherapies, which stimulate the immune system to fight cancer, and those treated with other drugs that suppress the immune system.”

Drawing on the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) registry, researchers analyzed data from 12,046 patients with COVID-19 who had a current or past diagnosis of cancer, making it one of the most large datasets analyzed to date in relation to patients with COVID-19 and cancer. The analysis looked at whether a weakened immune system or immunotherapy treatment was associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes – with hospitalization or death from the disease, and with a “cytokine storm”, an overreaction potentially dangerous immune system to infection.

“We found that patients who were both immunocompromised and treated with immunotherapies fared significantly worse than those who did not receive these therapies,” said Chris Labaki, MD, Dana-Farber, co-lead author of the item. Other co-lead authors are Ziad Bakouny, MD, MSc, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Punita Grover, MD, University of Cincinnati Cancer Center.

“Cytokine storm and COVID deaths were three to four times higher in this group,” Bakouny said. The same trend was verified, but to a lesser extent, for immunocompromised patients who had received certain types of systemic treatments. “In this group, cytokine storm and death from COVID were two to three times higher than in untreated patients.”

The results contain important messages for cancer patients as well as their doctors, the study authors said. “Patients at high risk for severe COVID should take steps to keep this risk as low as possible: wearing a mask, avoiding crowded places, keeping up to date with vaccines and reminders,” the researchers said. “High-risk patients who have been exposed to the disease should get tested quickly and, if positive, treated with antibodies or drugs that can reduce the severity of the disease.”

“When counseling patients on treatment, it is important that we discuss the benefits and risks of treatment with systemic therapies in relation to COVID-19,” said Choueiri, who also sits on the CCC19 steering committee. Dana-Farber is a founding institution of CCC19. “The results of this study can help us know what to expect.”

Co-lead authors, with Choueiri, are Yu Shyr, MD, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Trisha M. Wise-Draper, MD, PhD, of the University of Cincinnati Cancer Center. Co-authors are Andrew L. Schmidt, MD, of Dana-Farber; Joy Awosika, MD, Shuchi Gulati, MD, Roman Jandarov, PhD, of the University of Cincinnati Cancer Center; Chih-Yuan Hsu, PhD, Sanjay Mishra, MS, PhD, and James Yang, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Saif I. Alimohamed of Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center; Babar Bashir, MD, MS, and Andrea V. Rivera, MD, of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University; Stephanie Berg, DO, and Natalie Knox, of Loyola University Medical Center; Mehmet A. Bilen, MD, and Cecilia Castellano, of Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University; Daniel Bowles, MD, of the University of Colorado; Aakash Desai, MD, MPH, Arielle Elkrief, MD, Thorvardur R. Halfdanarson, MD, and Zhuoer Xie, MD, of the Mayo Clinic; Omar E. Eton, MD, and Emily Hsu, MD, of Hartford Healthcare Cancer Institute; Leslie A. Fecher, MD, of the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center; Daniel Flora, MD, PharmD, and Alicia Gesenhues, PharmD, BCOP, of St. Elizabeth Health Care, Edgewood, Kentucky; Matthew D. Galsky, MD, and Michael T. Wotman, MD, of the Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai; Margaret E. Gatti-Mays, MD, MPH, of The Ohio State University; Michael J. Glover, MD, and Sumit A. Shah, MD, of Stanford University; Dharmesh Gopalakrishnan, MD, of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center; Shilpa Gupta, MD, and Amanda Nizam of the Cleveland Clinic; Brandon Hayes-Lattin, MD of Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University; Mohamed Hendawi, MD, of Aurora Cancer Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Clara Hwang, MD, of the Henry Ford Cancer Institute; Chinmay Jani, MD, and Lisa B. Weissmann, MD, of Mt. Auburn Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Monika Joshi, MD, MRCP, and Lauren Pomerantz, MS, of the Penn State Cancer Institute; Hina Khan, MD, of Brown University and the Lifespan Cancer Institute; Shaheer A. Khan, DO, and Gary K. Schwartz, MD, of Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University; Vadim S. Koshkin, MD, and Daniel H. Kwon, MD, of UCSF, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco; Amit A. Kulkarni, MD, of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota; Sara Matar, MD, of Hollings Cancer Center, MUSC, Charleston; Rana R. McKay, MD, Taylor K. Nonato, and Justin Shaya, MD, of Moores Cancer Center, UCSD, San Diego; Feras A. Moria, from the McGill University Health Centre; Nora L. Nock, PhD, of Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland; Justin Panasci, MD, of the Jewish General Hospital, McGill University; Andrew J. Portuguese, MD, and Lisa M. Tachiki, MD of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Destie Provenzano and Yuan J. Rao, MD, of George Washington University; Matthew Puc, MD, of Virtua Health, Marlton, NJ; Terence D. Rhodes, of Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City; Gregory J. Riely, MD, PhD, and Adam J. Schoenfeld, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Jacob J. Ripp, DO, and Elizabeth M. Wulff-Burchfield, MD, of the University of Kansas Medical Center; Erika Ruiz-Garcia, MD, MSc, and Melissa Valdez-Reyes, MD, of the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico; Suki Subbiah, MD, of Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, LSU, New Orleans; Michael A. Thompson, MD, PhD, of Tempus Labs, Chicago; and Dimpy P. Shah, MD, PhD, of Mays Cancer Center, UT Health, San Antonio, for the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium.

The research is supported by grant support from the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (NCATS/NIH UL1 TR000445); the National Cancer Institute (P30 CA068485); the National Center for the Advancement of Translational Sciences at the National Institute of Health (2UL1TR001425-05A1; 2KLTR001426-05A1); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Fellowship; the Henry R. Shibata Fellowship; the Detweiler Travel Fellowship from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada; the American Cancer Society and the Hope Foundation MRSG-16-01-CCE and P30-CA054174; the National Cancer Institute (5P30CA0506036-31); the Melanoma Research Foundation; NIH T32 Research Training Grant; and the Kuni Foundation Discovery Fellowship.

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Breast cancer drugs benefit wider group of patients, trial finds https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-cancer-drugs-benefit-wider-group-of-patients-trial-finds/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 13:05:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-cancer-drugs-benefit-wider-group-of-patients-trial-finds/ Newswise – DALLAS – October 28, 2022 – Drug approved to treat breast cancer patients with mutations in the BRCA1 Where BRCA2 genes can also benefit people who have other genetic mutations. UT Southwestern researchers reported in the journal nature cancer that talazoparib successfully shrank tumors in breast cancer patients with mutations in the PALB2 […]]]>

Newswise – DALLAS – October 28, 2022 – Drug approved to treat breast cancer patients with mutations in the BRCA1 Where BRCA2 genes can also benefit people who have other genetic mutations.

UT Southwestern researchers reported in the journal nature cancer that talazoparib successfully shrank tumors in breast cancer patients with mutations in the PALB2 embarrassed. Patients with this mutation would not previously have qualified for treatment with talazoparib, a type of cancer drug known as a PARP inhibitor.

“Otherwise, these patients would have very limited treatment options,” said Joshua Gruber, MD, Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and member of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. “This study expands the patient population that may benefit from PARP inhibitors.”

Like other PARP inhibitors, talazoparib works by blocking a protein that usually helps cells repair damaged DNA. Without the ability to repair their DNA, cancer cells accumulate damage and eventually die. In cancers that have other defects in this process – including those with BRCA1/2 mutations – the drug is particularly effective, dealing a second fatal blow to the DNA repair machinery.

In a landmark 2018 study, researchers focused on patients with advanced breast cancer BRCA mutations – which account for 5% to 10% of all breast cancer cases – and found that talazoparib increased their survival time. The Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug for this group, and follow-up studies have shown that talazoparib also works for patients with prostate and pancreatic cancer. BRCA changes.

In the new phase 2 trial, Dr. Gruber and his colleagues tested the effectiveness of talazoparib in patients with advanced cancer with less common genetic mutations associated with DNA repair. Previous data suggested that more than 17% of all cancers have such mutations.

Twenty patients were enrolled in the trial at Stanford University, where Dr. Gruber previously worked. Thirteen had breast cancer, three had pancreatic cancer and four had other types of tumors. The patients had mutations in eight DNA repair genes. On average, they took one daily talazoparib pill for 23.8 weeks.

Among all patients, the average survival time was 5.6 months, and 20% had at least partial tumor shrinkage. As this was a phase 2 trial, there was no control group to compare this data to, but the results were particularly striking for patients with the PALB2 mutations: They survived an average of 6.9 months and all six patients (five with breast cancer, one with pancreatic cancer) showed tumor shrinkage.

The findings underscore the growing importance of genetic testing in guiding treatment for cancer patients, Dr. Gruber said. The team is planning a follow-up trial at UT Southwestern to better understand which patients get the most benefit from talazoparib.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty has received six Nobel Prizes and includes 24 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Full-time faculty of more than 2,900 are responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and committed to rapidly translating scientific research into new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in more than 80 specialties to more than 100,000 inpatients, more than 360,000 emergency room cases, and oversee nearly 4 million outpatient visits annually.

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Elimination of explored surgery for some breast cancer patients https://parentraide-cancer.org/elimination-of-explored-surgery-for-some-breast-cancer-patients/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 13:17:21 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/elimination-of-explored-surgery-for-some-breast-cancer-patients/ THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) — For highly selected breast cancer patients, elimination of surgery may be feasible for neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) responders identified with needle-assisted core biopsy vacuum (VACB), according to a study published online October 25 in The Lancet Oncology. Henry M. Kuerer, MD, of the University of Texas MD Anderson […]]]>

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) — For highly selected breast cancer patients, elimination of surgery may be feasible for neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) responders identified with needle-assisted core biopsy vacuum (VACB), according to a study published online October 25 in The Lancet Oncology.

Henry M. Kuerer, MD, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues conducted a multicenter Phase 2 trial at seven centers in the United States involving women aged 40 or older with cT1 -2N0-1M0 unicentric triple-negative breast cancer or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer and residual breast lesion less than 2 cm on imaging after clinically standard NST. Patients had a 9G image-guided VACB biopsy of the tumor bed; breast surgery was omitted if no invasive or in situ disease was identified, and patients underwent standard whole breast radiotherapy plus a booster.

Fifty patients underwent VACB after NST: 21 and 29 had triple-negative and HER2-positive breast cancer, respectively. The researchers found that the VACB identified 31 patients (62%) with a pathological complete response. No ipsilateral recurrence occurred in these patients at a median follow-up of 26.4 months. No biopsy-related serious adverse events or treatment-related deaths were reported.

“While these results are remarkable and quite promising, it is important for patients to know that this is the very beginning of a new type of treatment for some patients,” Kuerer said in a statement. “Much longer follow-up and further studies will be needed before this approach can be incorporated into routine breast cancer care.”

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical and publishing industries.

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Study offers combination treatment option for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/study-offers-combination-treatment-option-for-patients-with-oligometastatic-prostate-cancer/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 23:19:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/study-offers-combination-treatment-option-for-patients-with-oligometastatic-prostate-cancer/ A new study offers a new option for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer who want relief from hormone therapy without compromising the risk of spreading their disease. In the study, patients who received radiation therapy in addition to intermittent hormone therapy lived longer without their disease progressing, and they were able to take longer breaks […]]]>

A new study offers a new option for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer who want relief from hormone therapy without compromising the risk of spreading their disease. In the study, patients who received radiation therapy in addition to intermittent hormone therapy lived longer without their disease progressing, and they were able to take longer breaks from drug treatments. Results from the Phase II trial (EXTEND; NCT03599765) will be presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

This study is the first randomized trial to assess the impact of adding radiotherapy to hormone therapy in patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer –; that is, those whose cancer has spread throughout the body to five or fewer lesions, or metastases.

Since most prostate cancer cells depend on testosterone to grow, standard treatment usually involves therapy to deprive the body of the hormone. A growing number of studies indicate that local therapies such as radiation therapy and surgery combined with hormone therapy can improve outcomes for patients with oligometastatic disease, and the EXTEND trial is the first to demonstrate this in a randomized clinical trial.

Using radiation therapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer can result in excellent tumor control and good long-term outcomes, and it may allow us to give these patients long breaks from hormone therapy.

Chad Tang, MD, study lead author and associate professor of radiation oncology, University of Texas at Houston MD Anderson Cancer Center

Hormone therapy is an effective tool for prolonging survival for patients with metastatic cancer, but it often causes harsh side effects, Dr. Tang said. Depletion of testosterone can lead to low energy, impotence and hot flashes – what might be referred to as “male menopause” – as well as an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and of mental health disorders.

EXTEND is a collaborative trial involving adults with five or fewer metastases from different types of solid tumours. Dr. Tang’s team’s study is the leading prostate basket analysis, which recruited 87 participants who were on intermittent hormone therapy for prostate cancer. These patients were randomized to receive hormone therapy with (n=43) or without (n=44) local treatment. Local treatment options included radiation therapy, surgery, or cryotherapy to all sites of oligometastatic disease; all men in the trial received radiation therapy.

Patients received hormone therapy for at least two months before the start of the trial, and each participant stopped hormone therapy during a planned break six months after the start of the trial. Patients resumed hormone therapy when their disease progressed.

The researchers tracked the time until the patients showed evidence that their cancer had progressed, such as an increase in PSA. They also measured how long patients maintained normal testosterone levels after treatment before having to start hormone therapy again.

The median follow-up was 22.1 months and during this time the cancers of 41 patients progressed. Those who received local treatment in addition to hormone therapy experienced longer progression-free survival (median not reached versus 15.8 months for hormone therapy alone; HR 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.12 -0.55, p<0.001).

Fewer patients in the combination arm had new lesions two years after treatment (33% versus 41%, p=0.004). Patients in the combined group also had normal testosterone levels for longer than those who did not receive local treatment (p=0.03). Three serious (i.e. grade 3) side effects were observed in each treatment group.

The “powerful synergy” between radiation therapy and hormone therapy may be key to the promise of the combination treatment, Dr Tang said. “Hormone therapy has been shown in numerous studies to synergize with radiation therapy in reducing the ability of prostate cancer cells to repair themselves from radiation-induced DNA damage,” he explained. .

In addition to the clinical results, the research team also looked at the immune-stimulating effects of radiation. “In our study, we found increased T cell activation and other signals of greater immune activity in patients in the combination therapy group, but not in the hormone therapy alone group.”

After a patient’s prostate cancer metastasizes, the patient typically receives continued hormone deprivation. Dr. Tang said this study introduces a new paradigm of definitive radiation therapy for all of a patient’s oligometastases in tandem with defused intermittent hormone therapy as a way to preserve quality of life while maintaining disease control.

Source:

American Society of Radiation Oncology

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Three treatment options for breast cancer patients – Reading Eagle https://parentraide-cancer.org/three-treatment-options-for-breast-cancer-patients-reading-eagle/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 09:00:21 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/three-treatment-options-for-breast-cancer-patients-reading-eagle/ Millions of women around the world are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Such a diagnosis is never welcome, but women should know that survival rates have improved dramatically over the past few decades. In fact, the World Health Organization reports that at the end of 2020, nearly 8 million women were living well despite […]]]>

Millions of women around the world are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Such a diagnosis is never welcome, but women should know that survival rates have improved dramatically over the past few decades. In fact, the World Health Organization reports that at the end of 2020, nearly 8 million women were living well despite having been diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in the previous half-decade. .

One of the reasons for improved survival rates is the effectiveness of various treatments. The National Breast Cancer Foundation Inc. notes that doctors have a variety of options for treating breast cancer and often develop treatment plans that include a combination of treatments. Although no one wants to imagine being diagnosed with breast cancer, understanding the potential treatments for the disease can help women and their families be better prepared should that day ever come.

Here are three treatment options that doctors can discuss with women as they begin to find ways to beat the condition.

1. Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is used to treat various cancers, including breast cancer. Chemotherapy uses various drugs to destroy cancer cells or slow their growth. Drugs given during chemotherapy are called cytotoxic drugs and can be given by mouth or intravenously. The NBCF notes that chemotherapy is available to most patients, although doctors consider a host of variables before deciding whether chemotherapy is right for a given patient. These variables include tumor type, grade, and size.

2. Radiotherapy

During radiation therapy treatments, high-energy rays are used to kill cancer cells. Only cells in the part of the body that is being treated with radiation are affected, so patients do not have to worry about other parts of their body being affected by the radiation. The NBCF reports that patients diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) and most diagnosed with stage 1 or greater invasive cancer can expect doctors to prescribe radiation therapy. Women who have had a lumpectomy are also likely to be prescribed radiation therapy. Two main types of radiation are generally considered for breast cancer patients. External radiation therapy for breast cancer delivers cancer-fighting rays through a large machine. Internal radiation therapy for breast cancer is a newer treatment that injects cancer-fighting radiation treatments into the affected area.

3. Targeted therapy

The NBCF reports that targeted therapy is commonly used in combination with traditional chemotherapy. Targeted therapy attacks specific breast cancer cells without harming normal cells, which is why it tends to produce less severe side effects than chemotherapy treatments. Targeted therapy uses drugs to block the growth of cancer cells in very specific ways. One example cited by the NBCF is the drug Trastuzumab, or Herceptin, which is given to women whose breast tumors contain too much of the abnormal HER2 protein. Although the side effects of targeted therapies tend to be less severe, women may still experience problems like fever and chills, nausea, headaches, and other symptoms after the drugs are administered.

The expansion of breast cancer treatments has done much to improve patient survival rates. Women diagnosed with the disease are encouraged to take an active role in their treatments and to ask any questions they may have before, during and after treatment.

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