Cancer patient – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 04:30:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer patient – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Sajid Javid tells NHS to send cancer patients to private hospitals amid delays from Covid pandemic https://parentraide-cancer.org/sajid-javid-tells-nhs-to-send-cancer-patients-to-private-hospitals-amid-delays-from-covid-pandemic/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 01:53:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/sajid-javid-tells-nhs-to-send-cancer-patients-to-private-hospitals-amid-delays-from-covid-pandemic/ Sajid Javid tells NHS to send cancer patients to private hospitals to end further treatment delays caused by pandemic The Health Secretary reportedly told the NHS over the weekend to get private hospital beds Did so in an effort to increase capacity amid a growing number of trusts experiencing staff shortages due to Covid cases […]]]>

Sajid Javid tells NHS to send cancer patients to private hospitals to end further treatment delays caused by pandemic

  • The Health Secretary reportedly told the NHS over the weekend to get private hospital beds
  • Did so in an effort to increase capacity amid a growing number of trusts experiencing staff shortages due to Covid cases
  • Additional private beds will be paid for by the NHS and will include the provision of some forms of cancer surgery










The NHS has been ordered to send cancer patients to private hospitals to prevent their treatment from being further delayed by the pandemic.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid reportedly told the NHS over the weekend he needed to ‘urgently secure’ private hospital beds and equipment to increase capacity amid a growing number of trusts knowing debilitating staff shortages due to Covid cases.

It is hoped that these plans will prevent future restrictions being imposed on England, the Daily Telegraph reported.

Additional private beds will be paid for by the NHS and will include the provision of some forms of cancer surgery and other care not normally provided by the private sector under existing agreements.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid reportedly told the NHS over the weekend he needed to ‘urgently secure’ private hospital beds and equipment to increase capacity amid a growing number of trusts knowing debilitating staff shortages due to Covid cases

Some beds will also be made available in case Covid patients overwhelm the confidence of the NHS, leaving them unable to provide emergency care.

“We are going to do everything we can to avoid more restrictions,” a Whitehall source told the newspaper.

“Our lines of defense through vaccines, tests and antivirals are crucial and hold up, but we are also strengthening the capacity of the NHS as much as possible.

“Sajid wants the NHS to use the independent sector if necessary. The aim is to ensure that as much capacity as possible is available to help the NHS get through the Omicron wave.

NHS use of private sector facilities has increased 15% from pre-pandemic levels over the past year and includes the outsourcing of nearly 2,800,000 surgeries.

Some beds will also be made available in case Covid patients overwhelm NHS trusts leaving them unable to provide emergency care (stock image)

Some beds will also be made available in case Covid patients overwhelm NHS trusts leaving them unable to provide emergency care (stock image)

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Children with cancer finally eligible for the vaccine https://parentraide-cancer.org/children-with-cancer-finally-eligible-for-the-vaccine/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/children-with-cancer-finally-eligible-for-the-vaccine/ She said family friends had all been vaccinated and that she hoped being able to hang out Reef with children who had also been vaccinated, especially when she returned to school, would reduce her risk. “We have to be careful anyway, even before COVID, when you’re having chemotherapy, you have to be wary of people […]]]>

She said family friends had all been vaccinated and that she hoped being able to hang out Reef with children who had also been vaccinated, especially when she returned to school, would reduce her risk.

“We have to be careful anyway, even before COVID, when you’re having chemotherapy, you have to be wary of people who might just have the flu or chickenpox, stuff like that,” she said.

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“But we also have to stay normal, so we always try to let him do certain things with his friends. I guess we’re so much more wary of where we’re going and who we’re hanging out with.”

University of Sydney infectious disease physician Professor Robert Booy said it is extremely important that children with major underlying health conditions including cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, diseases heart and lung disease, and that those who had received cancer treatment were vaccinated against COVID-19, although their doctors would determine when the best time for them to receive the vaccine was, as sometimes it was better to delay vaccinating a seriously ill person until they have completed other treatment.

“Children will come back to school after they have already developed immunity to vaccination or infection,” he said.

“But the ones we need to worry about, and this always underlies those with major medical issues, these are the ones we should absolutely put in the queue and make sure they get vaccinated first. . “

Stay informed of the most crucial developments related to the pandemic with the coronavirus update. Sign up to receive the weekly newsletter.


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Nuvalent Announces First Patient Assay in ARROS-1 Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial of NVL-520, Its New Selective ROS1 Inhibitor https://parentraide-cancer.org/nuvalent-announces-first-patient-assay-in-arros-1-phase-1-2-clinical-trial-of-nvl-520-its-new-selective-ros1-inhibitor/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/nuvalent-announces-first-patient-assay-in-arros-1-phase-1-2-clinical-trial-of-nvl-520-its-new-selective-ros1-inhibitor/ ARROS-1 trial including patients with advanced ROS1 positive NSCLC and other solid tumors Clinical development of the parallel main program, NVL-655, in ALK-positive cancers is expected to begin in the first half of 2022 CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 7, 2022 / PRNewswire / – Nuvalent, Inc. (Nasdaq: NUVL), a biotechnology company creating precisely targeted therapies for […]]]>

ARROS-1 trial including patients with advanced ROS1 positive NSCLC and other solid tumors

Clinical development of the parallel main program, NVL-655, in ALK-positive cancers is expected to begin in the first half of 2022

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., January 7, 2022 / PRNewswire / – Nuvalent, Inc. (Nasdaq: NUVL), a biotechnology company creating precisely targeted therapies for clinically proven kinase targets in cancer, today announced that the first patient has been assayed in ARROS-1, its Phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating NVL-520 in patients with a Advanced ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other advanced solid tumors. NVL-520, the lead product candidate of Nuvalent, is a novel selective inhibitor of ROS1 designed to address the clinical challenges of emerging resistance to treatment, adverse CNS events and brain metastases that may limit the use of inhibitors of ROS1. ROS1 kinase currently available.

Nuvalent, Inc. (PRNewsfoto / Nuvalent, Inc.)

“Initiating the dosing of NVL-520 in patients in ARROS-1 is an important milestone for Nuvalent as we move from a preclinical to clinical stage company,” said Christophe turner, MD, chief medical officer of Nuvalent. “We designed NVL-520 to meet a specific target product profile developed in collaboration with leading physician-researchers currently actively treating patients with ROS1-induced cancers. We are encouraged by the preclinical data generated to date, which provides evidence that NVL-520 represents a differentiated, selective inhibitor of ROS1 with the potential to overcome the limitations of current tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and provide a novel therapeutic option for patients in need. “

ARROS-1 is a phase 1/2, multicenter, open-label, dose-escalating, expanding trial evaluating NVL-520 as oral monotherapy. The phase 1 dose escalation phase of the study is open and recruits patients with advanced ROS1-positive solid tumors who have already been treated with at least one prior treatment with ROS1 tyrosine kinase (TKI) inhibitor (TKI), and will assess the overall safety and tolerability of NVL-520 as well as determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), characterize the pharmacokinetic profile and assess preliminary anti-tumor activity.

Once a safe and tolerable dose is determined as RP2D, the trial is designed to proceed directly to the Phase 2 Multiple Cohort Extension phase, which will assess the overall activity of NVL-520 in patients. with ROS1 positive advanced NSCLC and other advanced solids. tumors. The Phase 2 part will look at several patient cohorts based on the number and type of previous cancer therapies they have received. The Phase 2 cohorts are designed to support potential registration in ROS1-positive patients with NSCLC who are kinase inhibitor naïve and in those who have previously been treated with ROS1 kinase inhibitors.

“Nuvalent wisely designed the ARROS-1 trial to support the goal of seamless acceleration of the first human dose exploration of NVL-520 in Phase 2 cohorts that are structured to assess multiple opportunities for potential recording, “said Darlene Noci, ALM, Senior Vice President of Product Development and Regulatory Affairs for Nuvalent. “Through a parallel assessment of NVL-520 in naïve TKI and clearly defined cohorts of pretreated patients, we aim to generate data to comprehensively assess NVL-520 throughout the ROS1-induced cancer treatment paradigm. .

In addition to NVL-520, Nuvalent is advancing a strong pipeline including the development of NVL-655 as a parallel lead program for the potential treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, as well as multiple discovery-phase research programs. .

“Our goal in 2022 is to establish Nuvalent as an operationally effective clinical-stage biotechnology company with an active internal R&D pipeline. We are on track for the planned IND submission for NVL-655 which should allow the opening of our second Phase 1/2 clinical trial for recruitment during the first half of the year, and continue to plan for the expansion of the portfolio with several new drug candidates discovered internally ”, stated James porter, Ph.D., CEO of Nuvalent. “By prioritizing a pipeline of new small molecules designed to overcome the dual challenge of kinase resistance and selectivity, we aim to deliver new drugs that may not only provide additional therapeutic options, but have the potential. to advance earlier in the treatment paradigm and become the best treatments for cancer patients. “

Nuvalent finished 2021 with $ 288.4 million in cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (unaudited), which, based on its current operating plans, is expected to finance its operations until 2024.

About the NVL-520

NVL-520 is a selective brain-penetrating ROS1 inhibitor designed to remain active in tumors that have developed resistance to currently available ROS1 inhibitors, including tumors with the prevalent G2032R resistance mutation and those with the S1986Y resistance mutations. / F, L2026M or D2033N. NVL-520 has been optimized for brain penetrance to potentially improve treatment options for patients with brain metastases. NVL-520 has been observed in preclinical studies to selectively inhibit ROS1 over the family of structurally related tropomyosin receptor kinases (TRKs) in order to potentially avoid the TRK-related CNS adverse events seen with dual inhibitors. TRK / ROS1 and result in longer lasting responses for patients with ROS1- mutant variants. NVL-520 is currently being investigated in the ARROS-1 study, a first phase 1/2 human clinical trial for patients with non-small-scale lung cancer. advanced (NSCLC) cells and other solid tumors.

About Nuvalent

Nuvalent, Inc. (Nasdaq: NUVL) is a biopharmaceutical company focused on creating precisely targeted therapies for cancer patients, designed to overcome the limitations of existing therapies for clinically proven kinase targets. Leveraging deep expertise in chemistry and structure-based drug design, we are developing innovative small molecules that have the potential to overcome resistance, minimize adverse events, treat brain metastases, and generate responses more durable. Nuvalent is advancing a strong pipeline with leading parallel programs in ROS1-positive and ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as multiple discovery-phase research programs. We regularly post information that may be important to investors on our website at www.nuvalent.com. Follow us on twitter (@nuvalent) and LinkedIn.

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended, including, without limitation, implied and express statements regarding strategy, business plans and l orientation of Nuvalent; the NVL-520 and NVL-655 clinical development program and schedule; the potential clinical effect of NVL-520; the design and recruitment of the ARROS-1 study and its schedule; the potential of Nuvalent’s pipeline programs, including NVL-520 and NVL-655; Nuvalent’s research and development programs for cancer treatment; the risks and uncertainties associated with drug development; capital allocation; and the future financial and operating results of Nuvalent and its expectations therein. The words “may”, “could”, “will fly”, “could”, “should”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “anticipate”, “intend to”, ” believe “,” expect “,” estimate “,” seek “,” predict “,” the future “,” project “,” the potential “,” continue “,”,,, although all statements prospectives do not contain these identifying words. The development and commercialization of drugs involves a high degree of risk, and only a small number of research and development programs lead to commercialization of a product. You should not place undue reliance on these statements or the scientific data presented.

All forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based on the current expectations and beliefs of management and are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and important factors that may cause actual events or results to occur. differ materially from those expressed or implied by any forward-looking statement. the forward-looking statements contained in this press release, including, without limitation, the risks that Nuvalent may not fully enroll in the ARROS-1 study or that this may take longer than expected; unexpected concerns that may arise from additional data, analysis or results obtained during the ARROS-1 study; the occurrence of adverse safety events; the risks of unforeseen costs, delays or other unforeseen obstacles; the risks associated with: the impact of COVID-19 on the countries or regions in which Nuvalent operates or operates, as well as the timing and timing and anticipated results of its clinical trials, strategy and of its future operations, including the ARROS-1 study; the timing and results of Nuvalent’s planned interactions with regulatory authorities; obtain, maintain and protect its intellectual property; and potential variations in cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities estimated on the basis of the completion of financial close procedures and the publication of full results for fiscal year 2021. These risks and uncertainties, as well as ” others, are described in more detail in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended. September 30, 2021, as well as any subsequent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Further, any forward-looking statement represents the views of Nuvalent only to date and should not be construed as representing its views at any later date. Nuvalent expressly disclaims any obligation to update forward-looking statements.

Cision

Cision

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SOURCE Nuvalent, Inc.



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Karmanos Cancer Institute Partners with Hibiscus to Advance Cancer Treatments https://parentraide-cancer.org/karmanos-cancer-institute-partners-with-hibiscus-to-advance-cancer-treatments/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/karmanos-cancer-institute-partners-with-hibiscus-to-advance-cancer-treatments/ The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute announced a partnership with Hibiscus BioVentures to advance cancer treatments. // Courtesy of the Karmanos Cancer Institute The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit and Hibiscus BioVentures, which helps build patient-focused businesses around transformative technologies, today announced a partnership agreement to advance cancer treatments. The partnership between Karmanos […]]]>
The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute announced a partnership with Hibiscus BioVentures to advance cancer treatments. // Courtesy of the Karmanos Cancer Institute

The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit and Hibiscus BioVentures, which helps build patient-focused businesses around transformative technologies, today announced a partnership agreement to advance cancer treatments.

The partnership between Karmanos and Hibiscus’ venture capital studio, Hibiscus BioTechnology, aims to leverage the combined resources of the two organizations to develop innovative therapies for the treatment of cancer. Karmanos is one of 51 cancer centers nationwide designated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

“We are excited to advance this patient-centric approach by leveraging Karmanos’ highly respected development resources,” said Chris Jeffers, CEO of Hibiscus BioTechnology. “As translational and clinical research partners, this collaboration is focused on combining the programs, capabilities and infrastructure of Hibiscus Biotechnology’s studio companies with Karmanos’ vast clinical research and development resources to advance cancer therapies and addressing unmet patient needs. “

The Hibiscus BioTechnology Studio companies each have financial and executive advice and operational support to advance a wide range of science and technology development programs and address unmet patient needs.

The collaboration with Karmanos will provide emerging companies Hibiscus BioTechnology Studio with clinical resources, including access to laboratories and research, scientific and thought leadership, clinical development strategy and access to the Karmanos hospital network to advance more early cancer care.

“Working with emerging companies to bring innovation to the clinic is key to helping bring new cancer therapies closer to patients,” says Dr Elisabeth Heath, Associate Director of the Center for Translational Sciences and Head of the Multidisciplinary Team of Genitourinary Oncology at Wayne State University and the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute. “We believe that the combined resources and mission shared by Karmanos and Hibiscus will bring new hope and new tools to cancer treatment.”

The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute is a leader in transformative cancer care, research and education. As a member of McLaren Health Care, Karmanos is the largest provider of cancer care and research in Michigan and operates 15 network sites that provide cutting-edge cancer care and clinical trials. Karmanos is recognized by the National Cancer Institute as one of the best cancer centers in the country.

Learn more about Karmanos Cancer Institute at karmanos.org.

Hibiscus BioTechnology is a venture capital studio focused on building “studio companies” based on innovative technologies, engages in the process of building new companies by securing rights to technologies with the promise of supporting programs development that can improve human health.

Technologies, products and business models are typically selected and designed to achieve proof of concept or significant clinical shift within one to three years, representing significant potential value creation.

Hibiscus BioVentures (Hibiscus) helps advance patient care by supporting the development of commercially viable therapies by building patient-centric businesses around transformative technologies. Hibiscus has “Both Sides of the House,” a venture capital studio focused on building businesses from scratch and a venture capital firm focused on investing in promising biotech start-ups.

Hibiscus says it builds and invests in biotech companies and is led by a team of industry experts who can provide the resources to successfully develop new therapies that address unmet patient needs.

For more information on Hibiscus Biotechnology and Hibiscus BioVentures, visit hibiscusbio.com.


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Asieris Announces World’s First Dose in Combination with Asieris APL-1202 and BeiGene’s Tislelizumab as Neoadjuvant for MIBC Patients https://parentraide-cancer.org/asieris-announces-worlds-first-dose-in-combination-with-asieris-apl-1202-and-beigenes-tislelizumab-as-neoadjuvant-for-mibc-patients/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 03:05:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/asieris-announces-worlds-first-dose-in-combination-with-asieris-apl-1202-and-beigenes-tislelizumab-as-neoadjuvant-for-mibc-patients/ SHANGHAI, January 3, 2022 / PRNewswire / – Asieris Pharmaceuticals (Asieris), an innovative global pharmaceutical company specializing in new drugs for the treatment of genitourinary tumors, today announced that the world’s first dose for a patient has been administered in the United States for its oral APL-1202 in combination with the tislelizumab from BeiGene as […]]]>

SHANGHAI, January 3, 2022 / PRNewswire / – Asieris Pharmaceuticals (Asieris), an innovative global pharmaceutical company specializing in new drugs for the treatment of genitourinary tumors, today announced that the world’s first dose for a patient has been administered in the United States for its oral APL-1202 in combination with the tislelizumab from BeiGene as a neoadjuvant therapy in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The Investigational New Drug Application (IND) was approved by the United States FDA in June and the National Medical Products Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation (CDE). China in October Last year respectively.

This is an open-label, multicenter phase I / II clinical study with the following objectives: to assess safety in MIBC patients; to determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and to assess efficacy as a neoadjuvant therapy for MIBC.

“APL-1202 in combination with tislelizumab as a neoadjuvant therapy has the potential to be the best treatment option for MIBC patients, we are very pleased that the first patient was administered in the United States,“said dr. Xue yong, MD, PhD, medical director at Asieris. “We have been successful in advancing the trial amid the COVID-19 pandemic, demonstrating not only the effective execution of our team, but also our commitment to improving human health.”

APL-1202 is an orally available reversible MetAP2 inhibitor with anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities and may also modulate the tumor immune microenvironment. It is currently in phase III / pivotal clinical trials in Chinaeither as monotherapy as a first-line treatment in patients with intermediate-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), or in combination with chemotherapy as a second-line treatment in patients with an intermediate and high risk chemo-refractory NMIBC. Tislelizumab is a humanized IgG4 anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody specially designed to minimize binding to FcγR on macrophages. The National Medicines Administration of China (NMPA) has approved tislelizumab in five indications, including full approval for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in combination with chemotherapy and for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC in combination with chemotherapy. The NMPA has also granted conditional approval for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) who have received at least two previous treatments, for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) with a elevated PD-L1 expression whose disease has progressed during or after chemotherapy containing platinum or within 12 months following neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy containing platinum, and for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma ( HCC) who have received at least one systemic treatment. Full approval of these indications depends on the results of ongoing confirmatory randomized controlled clinical trials.

About Asieris

Asieris Pharmaceuticals, founded in march 2010, is an innovative global pharmaceutical company specializing in new drugs for the treatment of genitourinary tumors and other major diseases. We strive to improve human health and help people live more dignified lives. We aim to become a global pharmaceutical leader that integrates R&D, manufacturing and marketing into our areas of focus, as we provide the best integrated diagnostic and treatment solutions for patients in China and around the world.

The company has developed its proprietary R&D platform and core technologies, exploring new mechanisms of action and effectively screening and evaluating drug candidates. With a well-established in-house R&D system and expertise in global drug development, Asieris is committed to launching first-class drugs and other innovative products to meet huge unmet needs in its focus areas. .

Asieris is also improving its pipeline for genitourinary diseases through exclusive R&D and strategic partnerships, while closely following cutting-edge technologies and therapies. The company strives to uncover and identify unmet clinical needs, and takes a forward-looking approach in product planning and lifecycle management. We aim to establish an exceptional portfolio that covers diagnosis and treatment with the aim of benefiting more patients in China and globally.

View original content: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/asieris-announces-the-worlds-first-patient-dose-administered-in-combination-of-asierisapl-1202-and-beigenes-tislelizumab – as-neoadjuvant-therapy-for-mibc-patients-301453061.html

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Doctor: Alcohol could increase cancer risk https://parentraide-cancer.org/doctor-alcohol-could-increase-cancer-risk/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:49:31 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/doctor-alcohol-could-increase-cancer-risk/ If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to cut back on your alcohol intake, here’s one more incentive for that plan: It could lower your risk of developing cancer. If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to cut back on your alcohol intake, here’s one more incentive for that plan: It could lower […]]]>

If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to cut back on your alcohol intake, here’s one more incentive for that plan: It could lower your risk of developing cancer.

If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to cut back on your alcohol intake, here’s one more incentive for that plan: It could lower your risk of developing cancer.

“The link to alcohol and breast cancer has been well defined,” said Dr. Paula Rosenblatt, an oncologist who treats breast cancer patients at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and professor Assistant in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Maryland.

“There are hundreds of studies that have shown the association that basically as little as one drink a day can increase breast cancer risk,” she said.

When it comes to talking about alcohol and health, Rosenblatt said that saying that a glass of wine a day is good for the heart has overshadowed the fact that alcohol can also pose serious risks to the heart. health, such as cancer. It’s not just breast cancer: the risk of other cancers of the head, neck and whole body increases with alcohol consumption.

As to why alcohol has this effect, there are a few hypotheses.

“Alcohol is just empty calories and can be associated with weight gain,” Dr. Rosenblatt said. “Obesity can also be associated with breast cancer. “

Another explanation is that metabolizing alcohol increases the level of estrogen in a woman’s body, and 80% of breast cancers are estrogen-positive breast cancers.

Does this mean you need to stop drinking completely?

“I think a drink here or there is safe,” Rosenblatt said. “It’s drinking regularly every day and drinking several servings of alcohol that is really the problem.”

Basically, save alcoholic drinks for special occasions or a weekend treat, instead of adding them to your menu every day, she said.

It is also important to note what constitutes a drink.

“I think the American portions of things are pretty large,” Dr. Rosenblatt said. “In medical terms, one serving of alcohol is only 5 ounces of wine, only one and a half ounces of alcohol, or a 12 ounce beer.” So be aware that your one drink could be more than one serving.

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How long should a cancer survivor continue to see their oncologist? https://parentraide-cancer.org/how-long-should-a-cancer-survivor-continue-to-see-their-oncologist/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 16:01:33 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/how-long-should-a-cancer-survivor-continue-to-see-their-oncologist/ When I was first diagnosed with breast cancer, I naively thought that I would have the same doctor for the rest of my life, but I didn’t. About a year after being treated by the same doctor, I noticed that our relationship was starting to change. He recommended that I add aromatase inhibitors to my […]]]>

When I was first diagnosed with breast cancer, I naively thought that I would have the same doctor for the rest of my life, but I didn’t.

About a year after being treated by the same doctor, I noticed that our relationship was starting to change. He recommended that I add aromatase inhibitors to my daily regimen. Following his advice, I tried one and had negative results. Reporting these to his office, another was recommended. I tried it too, and had even worse results.

After three attempts at taking various medications, I decided to stop taking the hormone medication. When I shared the decision with my oncologist, his attitude towards me changed. At subsequent appointments, I found out that he was adamant about my medication and was told that if I didn’t choose to comply, I had to find a new doctor.

It didn’t take long to find a new oncologist, and for five years I have been with the same doctor. I was thrilled when he asked for my advice as we worked together to develop a care plan. He seemed to appreciate my contribution and said, “It’s your body. You should have the final say on what happens to him.

It took great comfort to me to know that we were a team working for my long term survival. But earlier this year, unbeknownst to me, that doctor moved. I was unaware of his move until one day, several months later, I received an email notification warning me that I had an appointment with a provider that I had never met.

By contacting their office, I expressed my concern. They apologized and I decided to give the new doctor a chance. I thought he must be a good doctor if he was on the staff at the cancer treatment center. I decided to check it out before the visit. I have read rave reviews online that he is a good listener and puts patients at ease. Although the reviews seemed to indicate he was a trustworthy doctor, I was nervous. This gentleman didn’t know anything about me other than information he might have gleaned from the last oncologist’s notes. I couldn’t help but wonder how long he would have to go through this information before my appointment.

Upon entering the facility, I was delighted to find that the nursing staff had remained the same. I have become friends with many of them over the past few years. When it was time to go to the exam room, I felt my heart rate quicken. I didn’t know why I was so hesitant. Normally I was a very optimistic person, but for some reason I didn’t feel good about meeting the new doctor.

A few minutes after entering the room, I heard a knock on the door and before I had a chance to say, “Come in”, the doctor opened the door. He didn’t greet me with words but stuck his fist out at me. A few seconds passed before my mind understood why he had done this. “Oh,” I thought, “he wants me to punch him,” which I did quickly.

The doctor was blunt and arrogant in his words and demeanor. I felt uncomfortable and worried. I didn’t feel like he was listening even though he had asked a series of questions and I had answered. I brought some physical issues to his attention, but instead of sitting down with me and discussing it, he ignored me, turned to his scribe and said, “Schedule an ultrasound for him, an MRI and a PET ”, then he left the chamber. Sitting there with my mouth wide open, I watched the scribe follow suit.

I sat on the examination table in my little half-open front dress for a few minutes before realizing he wasn’t coming back. I got dressed and walked out of the room. Not a single member of staff approached to say goodbye or give further instructions. It was then that I made the decision to seek another doctor. I felt I deserved better than that.

How long should a person keep their oncologist? This is not an easy question to answer.

When initially diagnosed with cancer, a patient usually receives a personalized treatment plan. Often in the first year, the doctor will closely monitor the person who schedules visits as frequently as every three months. The following year, depending on the person’s condition, treatment schedule and other factors, the visits may be a little more spread out.

In my case, the second year I saw the oncologist every six months and this pattern repeated until I hit the five-year mark after diagnosis. At that time I was told that I would be seen every year and have been for a few years.

As a survivor who is doing well now, the annual visits have been wonderful. I feel like I’m always under the watchful eye of a doctor while still being able to enjoy life to the fullest, but for some with cancer this scenario may not be the case.

With advanced breast cancer, some women will need to continue treatments like chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy in order to keep the cancer at bay. These treatments can produce bothersome side effects that require constant communication with a healthcare professional.

The follow-up care after breast cancer can seem endless, but it’s important to remember that a good oncologist is always looking for evidence of a possible recurrence. That’s why it’s important to find an oncologist who you feel comfortable with.

Although my visit to the designated oncologist did not go well, I knew that I did not have to continue treating with him. I did my homework and found other oncologists near me. There were several specializing in breast cancer care and I found one with glowing credentials. After reading reviews online and chatting with the staff in his office, I felt confident about making an appointment.

It is not easy to be transferred from one doctor to another. While we have no control over whether a doctor leaves his office, moves out of town, or finds a job elsewhere, we are people – not balls that can be thrown. Relationships with any health care provider are important, but for the person with cancer it is essential that we feel safe with our doctors.

Although a person may assume that they will have the same oncologist during treatment, it may not work that way. Patients have rights and responsibilities regarding their care, and this includes feeling comfortable with their provider. It is important to weigh all the options.

Don’t get off the ship just because something is wrong with you, but if there is a legitimate reason to seek help elsewhere, please do so. Your body is yours. You have the right to the best health care available.

For more information on cancer updates, research and education, be sure to subscribe to CURE® newsletters here.


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Increased access to drugs is needed for breast cancer patients with gBRCA, PIK3CA mutation https://parentraide-cancer.org/increased-access-to-drugs-is-needed-for-breast-cancer-patients-with-gbrca-pik3ca-mutation/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 06:23:18 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/increased-access-to-drugs-is-needed-for-breast-cancer-patients-with-gbrca-pik3ca-mutation/ Most breast cancer patients who gained government approval for compassionate use of non-reimbursable drugs had gBRCA or PIK3CA mutations, signaling that the government should expand access to new drugs. According to the integrated drug information system of the Ministry of Food and Pharmaceutical Safety, the MFDS on Monday approved 61 cases of compassionate use of […]]]>

Most breast cancer patients who gained government approval for compassionate use of non-reimbursable drugs had gBRCA or PIK3CA mutations, signaling that the government should expand access to new drugs.

According to the integrated drug information system of the Ministry of Food and Pharmaceutical Safety, the MFDS on Monday approved 61 cases of compassionate use of therapies to treat breast cancer.

Twenty-eight compassionate use cases approved this year were for Pfizer Talzenna’s PARP inhibitor (left) and 22 for Novartis Piqray’s PIK3Caα inhibitor.

Almost half (28) of compassionate use involved Pfizer Talzenna’s PARP inhibitor (talazoparib) and 22, Novartis Piqray’s PIK3Caα inhibitor (alpelisib).

Pfizer’s Talzenna obtained marketing authorization on July 30, 2020, but national health insurance does not cover it.

Pfizer requested reimbursement from Talzenna immediately after obtaining the license, but the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) refused to grant it in November.

AstraZeneca Lynparza PARP inhibitor (olaparib) is available in Korea, but it is not reimbursed for the treatment of breast cancer.

The company applied for reimbursement for Lynparza in breast cancer when it changed the drug from capsule to tablet last year, but HIRA did not approve it.

Piqray is also not refundable in Korea.

On May 13 of last year, the treatment won the green light as combination therapy with fulvestrant in advanced or metastatic breast cancer in postmenopausal women and men who are hormone receptor positive (HR +), human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors negative, and PIK3CA mutation positive with disease progression after previous endocrine therapy.

Piqray is the only targeted therapy for patients with a PIK3CA mutation, who represent 40% of HR + / HER2- patients. But getting a refund became more difficult as the standard treatment changed during Piqray’s development.

Since the standard of primary care for HR + / HER2- patients has been changed to a combination of hormone therapy and CDK4 / 6 inhibitor, there is no way for Novartis to establish evidence for a phase 3 clinical trial in patients previously treated with CDK4 / 6 inhibitors.

Instead, Novartis is continuously producing data proving the effectiveness of Piqray in patients who used CDK4 / 6 inhibitors in phase 2 trials. Yet it is not clear whether the HIRA will recognize the data. as reliable evidence.

Under such circumstances, if Korean breast cancer patients with gBRCA or PIK3CA mutation wish to benefit from these targeted therapies, they should use them without insurance coverage or obtain compassionate use authorization with help. of doctors.

To get the green light for compassionate use, a hospital must spend a considerable amount of money on paperwork and manpower for follow-up. If a hospital does not have such resources, it is not easy to apply for compassionate use authorization. So, health experts said that only a number of large hospitals in Korea could use this system.

As the latest drug information from the MFDS has shown a clear demand for targeted therapies in breast cancer patients with a gBRCA or PIK3CA mutation, health officials will be under pressure to make targeted therapies reimbursable to manage these patients. , observers said.


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Retired cancer research pioneer leaves North Carolina legacy https://parentraide-cancer.org/retired-cancer-research-pioneer-leaves-north-carolina-legacy/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 10:01:06 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/retired-cancer-research-pioneer-leaves-north-carolina-legacy/ We hope that when we reach the end of our career, we can look back and say that we have achieved the goals we set for ourselves. Dr James Radford, an oncologist at the Pardee Cancer Center, had two goals in his profession: never to be bored and to leave thinking he had done something […]]]>

We hope that when we reach the end of our career, we can look back and say that we have achieved the goals we set for ourselves. Dr James Radford, an oncologist at the Pardee Cancer Center, had two goals in his profession: never to be bored and to leave thinking he had done something that wouldn’t have been done or done as well if he hadn’t. hadn’t been there.

As he retires from a remarkable career, there is no doubt that he can tick those boxes. Dr Radford has touched the lives of many through his compassionate care and the development of the cancer research program at Pardee, which has provided thousands of patients with access to a large number of national and international clinical trials. new cancer therapies.


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A new horizon in cancer care: liquid biopsy https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-new-horizon-in-cancer-care-liquid-biopsy/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 19:03:17 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-new-horizon-in-cancer-care-liquid-biopsy/ Mehmet Sitki Copur, MD, gives his take on liquid biopsies and how they can be used in gastrointestinal cancer. With innovations in liquid biopsy platforms over the past decade, the oncology world is witnessing the transformation of precision medicine in cancer care. The first FDA approval of a liquid biopsy test was the CellSearchCTC enumeration […]]]>

Mehmet Sitki Copur, MD, gives his take on liquid biopsies and how they can be used in gastrointestinal cancer.

With innovations in liquid biopsy platforms over the past decade, the oncology world is witnessing the transformation of precision medicine in cancer care. The first FDA approval of a liquid biopsy test was the CellSearchCTC enumeration platform in 2013, which focused on the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood.1 In 2016, the FDA approved the first circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) blood test, the cobas EGFR v2 mutation test, to detect EGFR Genetic mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 In 2020, the FDA approved 2 additional full genomic profiling liquid biopsy assays, Guardant360 CDx and FoundationOne Liquid CDx, both of which use next-generation sequencing technology to detect tumor genomic alterations in cDNA without cells in the body. blood.3.4 Although Guardant360 CDx can detect changes in over 60 different genes that are relevant in solid tumors, FoundationOne Liquid CDx can identify mutations or alterations in 300 or more genes.

In this issue of the journal, Christine Chung, DO, and her colleagues5 report on the biological and clinical correlates of genomic alterations in 77 consecutive patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), using the Guardant 360 CDx blood molecular profiling assay. This timely article reflects the current momentum in the use of liquid biopsies as an alternative to traditional tissue biopsies. The current standard, tissue-based molecular profiling is more invasive, not always easy to perform, and takes longer to produce results.6 Blood-based molecular profiling tests, on the other hand, are fairly recent. Despite recent advances, uncertainties remain; one determines the standardization of the schedule of blood collection and extraction methods, and another determines the test cutoffs for cDNA or CTC positivity.seven There are also possibilities for false positive or false negative results. Currently, the FDA recommends confirmation of negative Guardant 360 CDx or FoundationOne Liquid CDx test results with a tissue biopsy test. Likewise, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network 2021 clinical practice guidelines state that cell-free cDNA testing should not replace histologic tissue diagnosis, unless a patient is medically unfit for invasive tissue sampling. While in most cases a positive mutation, such as BRCA, BRAF, EGFR, Where FGFR, guides the targeted therapeutic decision, confirmation of a negative mutation may also have implications for treatment, as in the case of KRAS Wild-type tumors in colon cancer patients.

Although the guidelines are not well established, the basic principles of tumor biology can help in the decision of fluid vs tissue biopsy. The higher the tumor burden, the higher the yield can be for the detection of ActDNA in blood molecular tests. In a patient with early stage cancer or in a patient with metastatic cancer whose tumor responds well to current treatment, tumor shedding may not be high enough to detect cDNA in the blood. In this group of patients, tissue biopsy may be more appropriate. On the other hand, in a patient with metastatic cancer whose tumor progresses during or soon after treatment, blood-based molecular tests may be more applicable and may provide a rapid response for the next choice of treatment.

In the retrospective examination performed by Chung et al, the initial stage of patients varied from stage I to stage IV; the largest proportion (48%) had stage IV disease at the time of diagnosis. The blood of 35 of 77 (45%) patients exhibited one or more genetic alterations, with a median number of 3 alterations per patient. The gene most often altered was TP53, followed by KRAS, BRCA2, SMAD4, and CDKN2A. Among the patients with alterations, 36% had one or more potentially exploitable mutations, most often BRCA2 (12%); this was followed by STK11, KRAS, PIK3CA, NF-1, EGFR, and FGFR.

The humbling fact is that so far no agent has been approved against the most commonly identified mutations in PDAC other than olaparib, a PARP inhibitor (Lynparza). Clinical trials testing other agents are also limited. In addition to finding targeted treatment options, other valuable uses of liquid biopsy technology may be the application of serial liquid biopsy tests in patients currently undergoing treatment and the quantitative assessment of cDNA. to predict response and long-term clinical benefit. Likewise, monitoring patients who have completed curative treatment using molecular blood tests could be a valuable tool in determining the risk of recurrence.

Despite the growing popularity of liquid biopsy tests in cancer care, its current use appears to be primarily limited to late stage patients, as is the case in this study by Chung et al. However, in addition to its potential for diagnosing cancer, guiding treatment decisions, and monitoring resistance to treatment, several studies are currently underway to investigate how commercial liquid biopsy tests might track minimal residual disease. Ongoing research is also exploring the utility of liquid biopsy in early stage cancers as well as in detecting cancers in asymptomatic people at moderate risk. Two liquid biopsy early detection tests are making their way into clinical trials: the LUNAR-2 test is designed to detect colorectal cancer in asymptomatic people at average risk, and the Galleri test can detect more than 50 types of cancer, including including pancreatic cancer.8-10 One advantage of the Galleri test is that it may be able to detect cancers for which we do not have an effective screening test, such as pancreatic cancer. It is encouraging to see that blood-based molecular testing is increasingly being integrated into a variety of pivotal clinical trials, supporting the idea that this technology will be part of the standard of care of tomorrow.

The references

  1. What is the CELLSEARCH Circulating Tumor Cell Assay (CTC)? CellSearch. Accessed October 21, 2021. https://bit.ly/3vyTbd3
  2. The FDA approves the first blood test to detect a genetic mutation associated with non-small cell lung cancer. Press release. FDA; June 1, 2016. Updated March 1, 2019. Accessed October 21, 2021. https://bit.ly/3jr6DLf
  3. Guardant Health Guardant360 CDx, the first liquid biopsy approved by the FDA for the complete profiling of tumor mutations in all solid cancers. Press release. Guardian of health; August 7, 2020. Accessed October 21, 2021. https://bit.ly/3B4SkSK
  4. The FDA approves Foundation Medicine’s FoundationOne Liquid CDx, a comprehensive pan-tumor liquid biopsy test with multiple companion diagnostic indications for patients with advanced cancer. Press release. Medicine foundation; October 8, 2020. Accessed October 21, 2021. https://bit.ly/3Gbt7tC
  5. Chung C, Galvin R, Achenbach E, et al. Characterization of blood molecular profiling in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Oncology (Williston Park). 2021; 35 (12):XX-XX. doi: 10.46883.ONC.2021.3512.0XXX
  6. Sehayek O, Onn A, Roisman LC, et al. The impact of turnaround time for liquid biopsy versus tissue biopsy in advanced NSCLC. 2020 Thematic Meeting of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer: Liquid Biopsy – Global Virtual Event; 2-3 October 2020; virtual. Abstract VP01.33.
  7. Merker JD, Oxnard GR, Compton C, et al. DNA analysis of circulating tumors in cancer patients: a joint review by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists. J Clin Oncol. 2018; 36 (16): 1631-1641. doi: 10.1200 / JCO.2017.76.8671
  8. Beer TM, McDonnell CH, Nadauld L, et al. Interim results of PATHFINDER, a clinical use study using a methylation-based test for the early detection of several cancers. J Clin Oncol. 2021; 39 (suppl 15): abstr 3010. doi: 10.1200 / JCO.2021.39.15_suppl.3010
  9. Klein EA, Richards D, Cohn A, et al. Clinical validation of a methylation-based targeted multi-cancer early detection test using an independent validation set. Anne Oncol. 2021; 32 (9): 1167-1177. doi: 10.1016 / j.annonc.2021.05.806
  10. Lee J, Kim HC, Kim ST et al. Multimodal circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) colorectal neoplasia test for asymptomatic and early colorectal cancer (CRC). J Clin Oncol. 2021; 39 (suppl 15): abstr 3536. doi: 10.1200 / JCO.2021.39.15_suppl.3536


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