Cancer patient – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 11:32:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer patient – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Habits Secretly Increase Your Pancreatic Cancer Risk, Say Medical Experts – Eat This, Not That https://parentraide-cancer.org/habits-secretly-increase-your-pancreatic-cancer-risk-say-medical-experts-eat-this-not-that/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 11:32:08 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/habits-secretly-increase-your-pancreatic-cancer-risk-say-medical-experts-eat-this-not-that/ Pancreatic cancer affects 3% of the US population and is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because early detection is rare. The American Cancer Society says, “Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early. The pancreas is deep inside the body, so healthcare providers cannot see or feel early tumors during routine physical exams. People […]]]>

Pancreatic cancer affects 3% of the US population and is one of the deadliest forms of cancer because early detection is rare. The American Cancer Society says, “Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early. The pancreas is deep inside the body, so healthcare providers cannot see or feel early tumors during routine physical exams. People usually have no symptoms until the cancer has grown very large. or has already spread to other organs.” While genetics and age play a role in increasing risk, so do unhealthy habits that can be avoided. Eat this, not that! Healthprick with Sean Marchese, MS, RN, RN The mesothelioma center with a background in oncology clinical trials and over 15 years of direct patient care experience who shares the bad habits that increase your risk of pancreatic cancer. Read on and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure signs you’ve already had COVID.

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Marchesa says:The pancreas plays a vital role in digestion by producing the fluids needed to break down food into usable molecules and by releasing hormones that maintain blood sugar levels. The most common form of pancreatic malignancy occurs in the duct between the liver and the pancreas, known as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Traditional treatment methods are limited for pancreatic cancer, with surgery being the best option if the cancer is caught early. Targeted treatments, such as immunotherapy, will likely become more widespread as research continues.”

woman in bed with cancer
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Marchese explains:Unfortunately, pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage because symptoms only appear when other organs are affected. Depending on how far the cancer has spread, treatment options may include traditional chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, or a combination of approaches. However, pancreatic cancer is so deadly because pancreatic tumors notoriously respond poorly to treatment. Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate of all primary cancers, with an overall 5-year relative survival rate of 11%. Five-year survival improves to 42% for patients with limited progression. About 70% of patients with pancreatic cancer live less than a year after diagnosis.

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Smoking is not only one of the most important risk factors for pancreatic cancer, but it is also one of the most preventable,” Marchese points out. “Inflammation caused by cigarette carcinogens leads to the formation of fibrotic tissue in the pancreas and the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which is more likely in people with certain genetic risk factors. Smoking almost doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who have never smoked. The American Cancer Society reports that approximately 25% of pancreatic cancer cases are caused by smoking, but cigars and smokeless tobacco may also contribute to this risk.”

slices of different cuts of red meat on a wooden cutting board
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Marchese states, “Researchers noted a positive correlation between pancreatic cancers and red or processed meats such as pork and beef. The extent of the risk is still under investigation and the exact cause remains unknown. An analysis of nearly a dozen studies found that an increase in red meat consumption of 120 g per day (about a quarter-pound hamburger or four strips of bacon) was associated with an increase in 30% risk of pancreatic cancer in men but not in women. The study also found that for every 50g increase in processed meat per day, the overall relative risk increased by 19% for both men and women.”

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“Heavy alcohol consumption can lead to chronic pancreatitis, a long-term inflammatory process in the pancreas,” explains Was walking. “Over time, the increased inflammation causes damage to scar tissue and cells, increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer. Your body converts alcohol into acetaldehyde which can damage DNA, and when your cells attempt to repair the damage, errors in the process can lead to tumor formation. Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to many other serious problems, such as high blood pressure, stroke, and heart disease, as well as other cancers of the mouth, throat, liver, colon, rectum and breast.”

Woman sitting at gym with pink pilates ball.
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Marchese shares, “An inactive lifestyle can lead to many health problems, such as heart disease and cancer. Very obese people are about 20% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer. The risk is even higher for those who gain a lot of weight after adulthood or carry a lot of it around the waist, an indicator of visceral fat that can damage organs. Low levels of activity can also lead to type 2 diabetes, another risk factor for pancreatic cancer.”

Heather Newgen

Heather Newgen has two decades of experience reporting and writing about health, fitness, entertainment and travel. Heather is currently a freelancer for several publications. Read more

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Penile cancer is treatable, but the arsenal is slim https://parentraide-cancer.org/penile-cancer-is-treatable-but-the-arsenal-is-slim/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 19:47:57 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/penile-cancer-is-treatable-but-the-arsenal-is-slim/ In men in the United States, incidence-based mortality (IBM) is increasing for penile cancer, even though incidence has remained constant from 2000 to 2018. Among men in the United States, incidence-based mortality (IBM) is increasing for penile cancer, even though incidence has remained constant from 2000 to 2018. Existing treatments are of limited effectiveness and […]]]>

In men in the United States, incidence-based mortality (IBM) is increasing for penile cancer, even though incidence has remained constant from 2000 to 2018.

Among men in the United States, incidence-based mortality (IBM) is increasing for penile cancer, even though incidence has remained constant from 2000 to 2018. Existing treatments are of limited effectiveness and there are had a lack of research that could identify better options.

Penile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC), the most common form of the disease, is a rare cancer in high-income countries, with a prevalence of less than 1%. In contrast, the disease accounts for up to 10% of cancers in men in parts of Africa, Asia and South America.1 The American Society of Clinical Oncology estimates that 2,070 people will be diagnosed in the United States this year. In 2020, it was estimated that 36,068 people worldwide were affected by this disease.2

The disease can be fatal, but treatment is often successful, especially when diagnosed early. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in the United States for patients with this disease is 65%. For men with local disease, the 5-year OS rate is 80%, decreasing to 9% for those with distant metastases.2

However, the 5-year relative survival rate decreased slightly but steadily, from 67.7% from 2000 to 2004 to 65.67% from 2010 to 2014.3 Philippe E. Spiess, MD, MS, associate chief of surgical services and senior member of the department of genitourinary oncology at the Moffitt Cancer Center, as well as professor of oncology and urology in the department of urology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine said medical science just hasn’t done enough for these patients.

“The simple reason I think we’re seeing this, unfortunately, is that we haven’t developed, or identified, very effective systemic therapies for penile cancer patients. Often we can cure the cancer. early penis, fortunately,” said Spiess Live®. “However, when patients have advanced disease, I think we still struggle to identify good chemotherapies or immunotherapies or combination treatments that will be very effective for patients.”

The current standard of systemic care is 4 cycles of the TIP chemotherapy regimen, which includes neoadjuvant paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 on day 1 plus 1200 mg/m2 ifosfamide and 25 mg/m2 of cisplatin on days 1 and 3 for patients with N2 and N3 disease. In a landmark phase 2 study published in 2010, 23 out of 30 men completed all 4 treatment cycles. The overall response rate in these patients with this approach was 50% (95% CI, 31% to 69%), which included 3 complete responses and 12 partial responses (PR).4

More recently, investigators in China evaluated 19 men with advanced CCSP who received TIP treatment from June 2009 to June 2019. Five men have already had partial penile amputations. The other 14 had local carcinoma and fixed inguinal lymph node metastases.5

Twelve patients (63.1%) obtained PR and were operated. Five patients underwent bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy (ILND) and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND), and 6 had partial penile amputation plus ILND and PLND. One patient had penectomy plus ILND and PLND.

“Early-stage penile cancer is curable with surgery alone,” said Hao G. Nguyen, MD, PhD, Goldberg-Benioff Endowed Professor of Cancer Biology and Professor in the Department of Urology at the University of San Francisco. Live®. “We have been relying on the same chemotherapy for about ten years. We have not made progress in terms of treating metastatic disease. [That is why] you see a static survival rate, even a slight decline, for penile cancer.

He added that awareness of the disease is low and there is no established strategy for prevention or early detection. Additionally, there is no biomarker or pathway to identify PSCC and although the disease is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), there is no evidence showing that the HPV vaccine prevents the disease. penile cancer.

Depending on the size and extent of the lesion, partial or total penectomy is considered the standard oncological treatment. However, amputation is disfiguring and has a significant negative effect on quality of life (QoL). European Urological Association guidelines recommend penis-sparing surgery whenever possible and some evidence suggests that less invasive surgery is just as effective.

In a systemic review of 88 studies involving 9,578 men, European researchers found a 5-year disease-free rate of 82.0% with penile-sparing surgery versus 83.9% with amputation. Studies reporting low recurrence-free rates involved patients who had undergone penile-sparing surgery for advanced disease. In contrast, those reporting higher recurrence-free rates were from cohorts who underwent amputation for less advanced disease.6

Whichever method is chosen, surgery has a negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, patients reported more concerns about appearance and interference with life due to disfigurement following amputative surgery. The investigators cautioned that the quality of the evidence was low, but the results support the use of penile surgery, if possible.

Gender and sexuality raise unique concerns

It has been documented that patients are very concerned about organ function after treatment. The surgery “is commonly associated with mutilation,” according to 1 report, and affects sexual and urinary function and health-related quality of life.

“Our goal is to have organ-sparing surgery without compromising oncological control in our surgical approach,” Nguyen explained. “I would say depending on the location, if the lesion is at the end of the gland, then most of the time, even in T2 disease, you have to [be able to] spare much of the organ.

Spiess said the surgery has important ramifications for cisgender, non-binary and transgender patients. Preservation of sexual function is essential for physical and emotional health.

“One thing with this type of cancer, which is under-reported, is the implications it has for how patients identify after having undergone sometimes, unfortunately, quite mutilating surgery of the penis and that area, and how it affects their sexual identity, and their relationships with their partners,” Spiess said. “What I do in my practice, and several centers have started doing this as well, is [leverage] psychosocial counselors and educators essential for working with patients. We screen them for depression, for suicidal thoughts. [Traditionally,] this is something that has not been done very frequently. We must be very aware [of this,] and support our patients [to help them to understand] how it will affect them. And it will last for many, many more years. »

Spiess and Nguyen agreed that shame can prevent patients from seeking treatment. Results from a small study at Örebro University Hospital in Sweden showed that 65% of patients delayed treatment for more than 6 months.seven Data show that a delay of just 3 months was associated with increased risks of adverse clinical features, low penile sparing rate, and poor restoration of sexual function.8

Among patients who delayed treatment, 23.2% said they were embarrassed to describe the problem to practitioners. Another 19.5% of patients said they did not think their symptoms were severe.seven

“To counter this, we need to create a way to screen for penile cancer in the healthcare system. We screen for prostate cancer; we screen for colorectal cancer,” Nguyen said. “Why not ask every man to have a penis exam every year? Then it takes away those feelings or emotions associated with the review, and it just makes it more objective.

References

  1. Thomas A, Necchi A, Muneer A, et al. Penile cancer. Nat Rev Dis Primers. 2021;7(1):11. doi:10.1038/s41572-021-00246-5
  2. Penile cancer: statistics. Cancer.net website. February 2022. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://bit.ly/3OslSRD
  3. Deng X, Liu Y, Zhan X, et al. Trends in penile cancer incidence, mortality, and survival in the United States: a population-based study. front oncol. Published online June 17, 2022. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2022.891623
  4. Pagliaro LC, Williams DL, Daliani D, et al. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin for metastatic penile cancer: a phase II study. J Clin Oncol. 2010;28(24):3851-3857. doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.29.5477
  5. Xu J, Li G, Zhu SM, et al. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with docetaxel, cisplatin and ifosfamide (ITP) for the treatment of patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma with end-stage lymph node metastases. CMB Cancer. 2019;19(1):625. doi:10.1186/s12885-019-5847-2
  6. Sakalis VI, Campi R, Barreto L, et al. What is the most effective primary tumor management in men with invasive penile cancer: a systematic review of available treatment options and their outcomes. Euro Urol Open Sci. 2022;40:58-94. doi:10.1016/j.euros.2022.04.002
  7. Skeppner E, Andersson SO, Johansson JE, et al. Initial symptoms and delay in patients with penile carcinoma. Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2012;46(5):319-325. doi:10.3109/00365599.2012.677473
  8. Gao W, Song Lb, Yang J, et al. Risk factors and negative consequences of patient delay for penile carcinoma. World J Surg Oncol. 2016;14:124. doi:10.1186/s12957-016-0863-z

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Using Effective Cancer Therapies Earlier — Does It Always Work? https://parentraide-cancer.org/using-effective-cancer-therapies-earlier-does-it-always-work/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 18:02:33 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/using-effective-cancer-therapies-earlier-does-it-always-work/ If you have an effective tool, do you still need to use it more often or in more situations? It all depends on the specifics – and in the case of medical issues, it requires careful thought and well-designed clinical trials. Lung cancer was one of the first beneficiaries of the cancer immunotherapy revolution that […]]]>

If you have an effective tool, do you still need to use it more often or in more situations?

It all depends on the specifics – and in the case of medical issues, it requires careful thought and well-designed clinical trials. Lung cancer was one of the first beneficiaries of the cancer immunotherapy revolution that is now twenty years old.

For cancers that lack a genomic target that can be treated with an EGFR, ALK/ROS1, and other such inhibitors, immunotherapy has had significant impacts on survival in advanced lung cancer. With increased awareness, better imaging technology, and the advent of low-dose screening CT scans for those at risk for lung cancer, early detection is becoming more common. Surgery has long been the mainstay of localized and operable lung cancer.

However, recurrences due to residual microscopic disease that cannot be seen on CT scans are common and usually incurable. Prevention of recurrences with ‘adjuvant’ chemotherapy became standard treatment to address them, and was supplemented by radiation therapy for stage 3 cases, but the risk reductions were modest.

As immunotherapy became the standard of care for many cases of metastatic lung cancer because it was much more effective than chemotherapy alone, the natural question was whether this could be moved to the adjuvant setting. But immunotherapy is not without consequences, sometimes serious and sometimes fatal side effects.

Where should the line be drawn so that the improvement in mortality clearly outweighs the harms of treatment? The only way to answer that was with clinical trials – and not just one, but several with different designs and using various immunotherapies.

Thanks to the deliberate and innovative design of these studies, as you will read about in this issue of CURE®, recurrences have been reduced by more than a third using this approach. And there is room to go even further as improvements in harnessing the immune system against cancer continue with more laboratory discoveries and new agents that focus on more recently discovered immune system modulators.

The patient stories in our dossier on this subject illustrate how they have become partners in therapeutic advances by, in some cases, participating in trials, or simply taking the time to understand their disease, the powerful treatments involved and appreciating what they could do to help their own cause by learning the protocol and knowing what side effects to report to their healthcare team.

The field is changing faster than ever – immunotherapy being a
much of the latest successes, but greatly aided by the migration of effective therapies to the early stages of the disease process.

DEBU TRIPATHY, MD

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Professor and Director, Breast Department
Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, TX

For more information on cancer updates, research and education, be sure to subscribe to CURE® newsletters here.

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Tyson Fury shows his class in a beautiful moment with young cancer patient River Rhodes https://parentraide-cancer.org/tyson-fury-shows-his-class-in-a-beautiful-moment-with-young-cancer-patient-river-rhodes/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 11:28:53 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/tyson-fury-shows-his-class-in-a-beautiful-moment-with-young-cancer-patient-river-rhodes/ There aren’t many bigger names in the boxing world than Tyson’s Fury at present. The heavyweight superstar has ended his career after doing light work on Dillian Whyte at Wembley Stadium. It was the culmination of what had been an incredible rollercoaster ride for Fury, ending his undefeated boxing career. Whether he’s able to stay […]]]>

There aren’t many bigger names in the boxing world than Tyson’s Fury at present.

The heavyweight superstar has ended his career after doing light work on Dillian Whyte at Wembley Stadium.

It was the culmination of what had been an incredible rollercoaster ride for Fury, ending his undefeated boxing career.

Whether he’s able to stay retired is a whole other question and you can imagine he’ll be keeping a close eye on the outcome of the Oleksandr Usyk and Anthony Joshua rematch in August.

He continued to train and keep fit even in retirement, leading fans to believe that didn’t completely close the door on his time in the ring.

The world was desperate to see him and Joshua finally come to blows and, should AJ avenge his initial loss to Usyk, Fury could well be brought back into the game.

In the meantime, however, Fury continues to enjoy the fruits of his retirement, flying around the world with his family on lavish vacations.

However, when he’s not enjoying his free time, Fury continues to prove he’s a champion both inside and outside of the ring.

Tyson Fury pictured with his wife Paris Fury

Footage emerged today of the Gypsy King sharing a beautiful moment with young bone cancer patient River Rhodes.

In the footage, Fury is seen fooling around with River, who nutmegs him in a hallway.

Later, the massive heavyweight is seen embracing River while praying with and for him.

You can see the wholesome footage in the clips below:

Brilliant – Fury is truly a first class guy.

It would be such a shame if we actually saw the last of Fury in the ring. As one of Britain’s greatest boxers of all time, it seems like a waste of time for him to walk away from the fighting game when he’s in his prime.

That said, having been involved in some of the greatest heavyweight fights of a generation, you can hardly blame the man for a little downtime.

News Now – Sports News

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The Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation is pushing for access to genetic testing for all cancer patients with an additional donation to Princess Margaret https://parentraide-cancer.org/the-bhalwani-family-charitable-foundation-is-pushing-for-access-to-genetic-testing-for-all-cancer-patients-with-an-additional-donation-to-princess-margaret/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 11:39:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/the-bhalwani-family-charitable-foundation-is-pushing-for-access-to-genetic-testing-for-all-cancer-patients-with-an-additional-donation-to-princess-margaret/ $1.5 million donation supports universal genetic testing for cancer patients TORONTO, June 23, 2022 /CNW/ – The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation is delighted to announce that the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation has made an additional donation $1.5 million donation to the Family Cancer Clinic at Princess Margaret Cancer Center to continue advancing the shared vision […]]]>

$1.5 million donation supports universal genetic testing for cancer patients

TORONTO, June 23, 2022 /CNW/ – The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation is delighted to announce that the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation has made an additional donation $1.5 million donation to the Family Cancer Clinic at Princess Margaret Cancer Center to continue advancing the shared vision of empowering every cancer patient at Princess Margaret and across the province of Ontario to have access to genetic tests for the early detection of cancer. With this additional donation, the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation has contributed $2.5 million to support hereditary cancer research and screening.

The Family Cancer Clinic, newly named the Bhalwani Family Cancer Clinic in recognition of their donation, is from Canada largest genetics clinic dedicated to cancer patients. Led by dr. Raymond Kimmedical geneticist and Director, Cancer Early Detection, the clinic offers genetic counseling and risk assessment services to people with a personal history of cancer or at high risk for inherited cancers, enabling early detection and personalized care.

With support from the most recent gift from the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation, Dr Kim is leading a universal genetic screening program with 1,300 breast cancer patients at Princess Margaret’s Breast Site Group, the largest and most comprehensive breast cancer research and care center Canada. The aim will be to demonstrate that universal genetic testing can lead to the identification of cancer susceptibility genes that would otherwise have gone undetected, allowing for earlier intervention and better patient outcomes. During the study, patients will undergo a simple blood or saliva test as part of their standard treatment to screen for dozens of genes responsible for hereditary cancers and other syndromes.

“We are at a turning point in personalized medicine where expensive genetic testing now costs a few dollars per gene. Instead of relying on family trees, we can use upfront genetic testing to identify high-risk families,” says Dr. Kim.

“With cancer stubbornly remaining the number one killer of Canadians and the number of new cancer cases expected to increase by 40% between 2015 and 2030, now is the time to get ahead of cancer,” says the doctor. Miyo Yamashita, President and CEO, The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. “Genetic testing is a non-invasive early detection tool that needs to be used more widely. We are grateful for the generous donation from the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation which will change the lives of Canadians today and set a precedent for the importance and future of genetic testing.

The donation will also establish the Bhalwani Family Compassionate Fund to provide financial support to cancer patients who request genetic testing and who do not meet the funding criteria established by the Ontario Ministry of Health or who do not don’t have access to the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP), which means they have to pay out of pocket for the test.

“By leveraging The Princess Margaret’s renowned expertise and infrastructure, we have been able to help create a comprehensive family cancer clinic and fill an important clinical gap,” commented Arif N. Bhalwani, Director, The Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation. “This clinic advances the awareness of genetic cancers and makes detection a path to a cure. Hereditary cancers have touched our family and we hope that genetic testing for cancer will become the norm so that we can have a length of life. advance with better treatment options and significantly improve survival rates.”

In 2019, the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation made a visionary investment in cancer genetics at Princess Margaret with a $1 million donation to establish the Bhalwani Family Hereditary Cancer Fund. Supporting the establishment and operation of the clinic, the donation has resulted in a 30% increase in the number of patients seen over the past three years and enabled the establishment of a 100% virtual genetics clinic in response to the pandemic.

About the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation

The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation is from Canada the world’s largest and most important cancer charity, dedicated to raising funds for the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, one of the top five cancer research centers in the world, known for its groundbreaking scientific achievements and its exceptional treatment and care for patients. Through philanthropy, events, our world-class door-to-door lottery program, and marketing initiatives, we make possible the critical funding needed to accelerate cancer research, education, and clinical care—to benefit patients at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center throughout Canada and the world. www.thepmcf.ca

About Princess Margaret Cancer Center

The Princess Margaret Cancer Center has earned an international reputation as a world leader in the fight against cancer and the delivery of personalized cancer medicines. Princess Margaret, one of the top five cancer research centers in the world, is a member of the University Health Network (UHN), which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and Michener Institute for Education. The UHN is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto. www.laprincessemargaret.ca

About the Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation

The Bhalwani Family Charitable Foundation (BFCF) is based in Toronto, Canada and invests in human potential and improving the quality of life of children, immigrants and marginalized communities. BFCF seeks to sponsor research and programs that are underfunded or overlooked, but which can have significant impacts quickly.

SOURCE Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation

For further information: Stacey Sheehan, Senior Communications Coordinator, The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, 437-220-5751, [email protected]

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American Society for Clinical Oncology, June 3-7 – Consumer Health News https://parentraide-cancer.org/american-society-for-clinical-oncology-june-3-7-consumer-health-news/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 16:27:56 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/american-society-for-clinical-oncology-june-3-7-consumer-health-news/ The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology was held June 3-7 in Chicago and attracted more than 40,000 attendees from around the world, including clinicians, academics, allied health professionals and other interested individuals by oncology. The conference featured the latest advances in clinical cancer research, including oral abstract presentations and poster presentations […]]]>

The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology was held June 3-7 in Chicago and attracted more than 40,000 attendees from around the world, including clinicians, academics, allied health professionals and other interested individuals by oncology. The conference featured the latest advances in clinical cancer research, including oral abstract presentations and poster presentations in disease and specialty areas. Presentations focused on new targeted therapies as well as improvements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches.

In the TROPiCS-02 Phase 3 clinical trial, Hope S. Rugo, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center, and colleagues found that the use of sacituzumab govitecan improves median disease-free survival. progression (PFS) compared to standard chemotherapy in patients with hormone-resistant hormone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HR+/HER2−) negative heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer.

The authors assessed the efficacy of sacituzumab govitecan versus physician’s choice chemotherapy for HR+/HER2− advanced breast cancer. Across 113 international sites, 543 patients with HR+/HER2− metastatic breast cancer who had been treated with hormone therapy, CDK4/6 inhibitors and two to four chemotherapy regimens were recruited. Researchers found that sacituzumab govitecan improved median PFS by 34% compared to standard chemotherapy; there was also a non-significant trend observed in overall survival. The overall response rate was 21% for those who received sacituzumab govitecan, compared with 14% for those who received standard chemotherapy. Additionally, the researchers found that the rate of clinical benefit and the median duration of response were both favorable to sacituzumab govitecan.

“In TROPiCS-02, sacituzumab was studied in very heavily pretreated hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer patients with very limited options, and offers potential for an effective alternative therapy for these patients,” Rugo said. “Overall, it is important to have new treatment options, extend quality of life, and provide disease control for patients with advanced, highly pretreated hormone receptor cancer.”

The study was funded by Gilead Sciences, the maker of sacituzumab govitecan.

Press release

In the prospective single-arm Phase 3 LUMINA trial, Timothy Joseph Whelan, MD, of McMaster University and Juravinski Cancer Center in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues found that the recurrence rate is very low in women 55 years of age or older with luminal breast cancer not treated with radiation therapy.

The authors recruited 500 patients from 26 centers in Canada who had Grade 1 or 2 nodeless tumors less than 2 cm in size that had been removed by breast-conserving surgery and were luminal A tumors with a Ki67 tumor cell count of 13.25% or less. . The patients underwent breast-conserving surgery, followed by hormone therapy, but did not receive radiation therapy. At five years, the researchers found a 2.3% chance of local recurrence and a 1.9% chance of a new breast cancer developing in the breast not originally affected by the cancer. The disease-free survival rate was 97.3% and the disease-free survival rate was 89.9%. The overall survival rate was 97.2%.

“We tested a biomarker, which allows women aged 55 and over with low-grade type A luminal breast cancer to avoid radiation therapy, which can be expensive, time-consuming and associated with significant side effects” , Whelan said. “We found that in women 55 years or older with luminal A breast cancer treated without radiation therapy, the recurrence rate remains very low. As such, practicing clinicians may want to omit radiation therapy for this type of patient.”

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Press release

Eric Bouffet, MD, of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and colleagues found that the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib significantly increased the overall response rate in pediatric patients with BRAF Low-grade gliomas carrying the V600 mutation compared with the standard chemotherapy combination of carboplatin plus vincristine.

In a double-blind clinical trial, the authors randomly assigned 110 patients (ages 1 to 17) who had BRAF low-grade gliomas carrying the V600 mutation either on dabrafenib twice daily plus trametinib once daily or on standard doses of carboplatin plus vincristine. The researchers found that the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib resulted in an overall response rate of 47%, compared to 11% for the standard chemotherapy combination of carboplatin and vincristine. The researchers also observed significant improvements in clinical benefit rate, duration of response, time to response, PFS and overall survival in those who received dabrafenib and trametinib.

“For pediatric patients with BRAF V600-mutant low-grade glioma, dabrafenib plus trametinib may provide a better level of care,” Bouffet said in a statement. “This represents an important breakthrough for younger brain cancer patients because it is the first combination of targeted therapies developed for patients as young as [age 1 year].”

The study was funded by Novartis, the maker of dabrafenib and trametinib.

Press release

ASCO: Ramucirumab Plus Pembrolizumab promising in NSCLC

THURSDAY, June 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

Read the full text

ASCO: High risk of suicide among cancer patients in the United States

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Patients diagnosed with cancer are at high risk of suicide, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7. in Chicago.

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ASCO: Ancestry-specific genetic risk examined for TNBC

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Women of African descent more often have a personal history of triple-negative breast cancer, but the magnitude of gene-specific risks for triple-negative breast cancer is similar across different races/ethnicities groups, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Black patients with metastatic breast cancer ready to consider clinical trials

TUESDAY, June 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Black patients with metastatic breast cancer are ready to consider entering clinical trials, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, which was held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Disparities observed in the use of telehealth for cancer care during the pandemic

TUESDAY, June 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Racial, geographic and socioeconomic disparities have been observed in the use of telehealth among patients starting cancer treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: desmoplastic melanoma responds to neoadjuvant pembrolizumab

TUESDAY, June 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — For patients with resectable desmoplastic melanoma, treatment with pembrolizumab before resection results in a high pathological complete response rate, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: ACA Medicaid expansion has improved access to cancer trials

TUESDAY, June 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Implementation of the Medicaid Expansion Affordable Care Act was associated with an increase in the proportion of patients using Medicaid in cancer clinical trials, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Parental cancer linked to risk of unmet social needs in children

TUESDAY, June 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Parental cancer is associated with a greater likelihood of food insecurity at the family level, financial worries about housing costs and other monthly bills, and barriers to transportation to medical care for American children, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: cDNA analysis guides treatment for stage II colon cancer

MONDAY, June 6, 2022 (HealthDay News) — According to a study published online June 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Increase in cancer-related deaths observed during the pandemic

MONDAY, June 6, 2022 (HealthDay News) — From 2019 to 2020, there was a 3.2% increase in cancer-related deaths, which was more than the expected number of deaths, according to a study presented at the meeting. annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Supplemental ibrutinib slows mantle cell lymphoma in older adults

FRIDAY, June 3, 2022 (HealthDay News) — For elderly patients with untreated mantle cell lymphoma, adding ibrutinib to standard chemoimmunotherapy significantly prolongs progression-free survival, a study published in line on June 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held June 3-7 in Chicago.

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Elderly cancer patient forced to lie on frozen track for three hours while waiting for ambulance https://parentraide-cancer.org/elderly-cancer-patient-forced-to-lie-on-frozen-track-for-three-hours-while-waiting-for-ambulance/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:33:32 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/elderly-cancer-patient-forced-to-lie-on-frozen-track-for-three-hours-while-waiting-for-ambulance/ A 77-year-old grandmother with a broken hip was made to wait almost three hours for an ambulance on Saturday. After taking a bad fall while trimming her trees, Marita James had no choice but to fall asleep on a freezing footpath at Andrews Farm in north Adelaide. Watch the video above to learn more about […]]]>

A 77-year-old grandmother with a broken hip was made to wait almost three hours for an ambulance on Saturday.

After taking a bad fall while trimming her trees, Marita James had no choice but to fall asleep on a freezing footpath at Andrews Farm in north Adelaide.

Watch the video above to learn more about this story

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James, an elderly cancer patient, was pruning the trees in her home with her daughter when she lost her footing and fell to the pavement at 4.40pm.

She broke her hip and was left with cuts to her head and fractures to her face.

Her daughter Naomi immediately called triple zero and rushed to stop the bleeding, but as the sun began to set all she could do was do her best to keep her mother warm.

Naomi brought a pillow and blankets to her mother in an attempt to insulate her from the bite of the cold concrete.

The ambulance finally arrived at 7.25pm ​​and James was taken to Lyell McEwin Hospital in Elizabeth Vale, where she is expected to stay for weeks.

The call was initially considered a priority three by SA Ambulance staff, who in such cases aim to respond within 30 minutes, but was later upgraded by authorities to a priority two.

Priority two calls have a target response time of 16 minutes, but the Ambulance Employees Association says calls in this category took up to five hours, with some priority three cases taking up to eight hours.

Minutes turned into hours for Marita, Naomi and the neighbors who had come out of their homes to help – and they began to think the incident had been forgotten.

“I just turned around and she was just on the ground,” Naomi told 7NEWS.

“I immediately called triple zero and just tried to keep her warm.

“Even though we wanted to lift her up and put her in the car and take her away, I’m glad we didn’t because that fracture could have gotten worse.

“You can’t leave people like that for that amount of time.”

A neighbor who was helping at the scene told 7NEWS: “Obviously we stopped the bleeding, but we couldn’t move her because she was in a lot of pain.”

“She was freezing.”

Figures show SA Health recorded its worst ambulance response times in the past month.

“It really breaks my heart, but it also confirms, I think, the fact that we are doing the right thing by investing a lot more in our health system,” said South African Prime Minister Peter Malinauskas.

Labor is set to recruit 350 additional paramedics and paramedics and deploy 36 additional ambulances in a $107.8 million investment to help repair delays in ambulance response times and reduce pressure on overloaded teams over the next four years.

SA Ambulance Service has announced that 115 more paramedics will start work before the end of the year, including 16 from July.

The first new recruits will provide care in Norwood, while other recruits will work in metropolitan and regional areas, including Golden Grove, Marion, Edwardstown, Parafield, Mount Barker and Gawler.

“The fact that South Australians are frequently calling triple zero and not getting ambulances on time is a representation of a crisis that is costing people’s lives,” Malinauskas previously said.

“New state-of-the-art infrastructure, more ambulances and a larger workforce will help our ambos provide emergency care to South Australians when they need it.”

-With AAP

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A new cancer treatment is 100% effective in a small trial https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-new-cancer-treatment-is-100-effective-in-a-small-trial/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:30:39 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-new-cancer-treatment-is-100-effective-in-a-small-trial/ A small glimmer of hope in what looks like a world ravaged by mass shootings and soaring gas prices: A small trial of a new cancer drug in 14 colorectal cancer patients has eliminate 100% of the tumor in each patient. The New York Times called the results “astonishing” and word quickly spread around the […]]]>

A small glimmer of hope in what looks like a world ravaged by mass shootings and soaring gas prices: A small trial of a new cancer drug in 14 colorectal cancer patients has eliminate 100% of the tumor in each patient. The New York Times called the results “astonishing” and word quickly spread around the world.

And while 14 patients is still a very small sample size for a study, oncology experts point out that it is still literally unknown for any intervention to completely eliminate cancer in every person studied. “All 14 patients? The odds are extremely low and really unknown in oncology,” Andrea Cercek, lead study author and an oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, told The Washington Post.

The drug will of course require further trials, but for now those who have been touched by cancer and those in the research community are celebrating what could be a game-changer for cancer treatment.

>> Click to see the 4 steps to becoming a cosmetic nurse

Study details

The actual study was published in the Journal of New England Medicine and detailed how the current approach to treating rectal cancer, while effective in giving a 77% survival rate for 3 years for many patients, is also “exhausting”. A combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy can lead to complications such as,

  • Neuropathy
  • Infertility
  • Intestinal dysfunction
  • Sexual dysfunction

Therefore, the search for a treatment that can be effective but minimize some of the more serious complications. In this case, the study treatment was dostarlimab, a new intravenous drug specially designed to treat cancer. It blocks a protein in cancer cells that cancer uses to prevent the immune system from fighting cancer.

Dostarlimab-gxly (Jemperli, GlaxoSmithKline LLC) was approved by the FDA in August 2021 for adult patients with recurrent or advanced solid tumors deficient in mismatch repair (dMMR) who had no other treatment options. According to the FDA, some of the adverse effects of the drug included,

  • Fatigue
  • Anemia
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Sepsis
  • Acute kidney injury

In the colorectal cancer study, 9 doses of IV dostarlimab were given over a 6-month period to all 14 patients who had not yet started any other type of treatment. All the patients also had the same genetic instability in their cancer, called mismatch repair deficit. This genetic trait is a deficiency in the body’s normal function to “fix” errors that occur during cell division and lead to mutations. According to the Washington Post, 5-10% of all rectal cancer patients have this genetic deficiency, which generally makes chemotherapy less effective for them.

At the start of the study, all the patients presented with “knobby and discolored” tumours. But by the end of the six months? All traces of the tumors had completely disappeared. All biopsies, scans and physical exams revealed that there was no longer a single lump of cancer.

Even more remarkably, the patients were diverse and none suffered serious side effects from the drug; none require further processing to date. At present, four other patients are undergoing treatment with the same drug and so far show the same positive pattern of complete disappearance of the cancer.

Hope for the future

While experts still warn that much more research needs to be done – and even these patients have been following for years to make sure the cancer doesn’t come back – it does offer a ray of hope. The drug may be an option for other adults with cancer who also have mismatch repair deficiency and it could hopefully lead to more cancer breakthroughs in the future.

Some experts have also pointed out that the trial could raise awareness of the importance of genetic testing in cancer, as treatment can be tailored to the type of genetic traits involved in cancer, such as mismatch repair deficiency. Treatment can then be tailored to the type of genetic traits involved in the cancer.

Cancer is a disease that shows no mercy, claims victims of all ages and scars families for generations, so any hope on the horizon is celebrated by many. On social media, many people expressed their joy that the lawsuit could give way to more breakthroughs in the future.

“This is wonderful news!!!” commented Warren Pughsley. I am always delighted to hear some people talk about cancer. My wife didn’t, so I feel like every time I see people succeed, she played a part in it because she was working on the field. Congratulations to the patients and their families! God protects you!”

And Sascha Roth, the first patient in the trial who was even able to continue her running regimen thanks to her drug treatment in 2019, has already lost her father to cancer and will soon lose her mother to cancer. . She said she felt tremendous gratitude and hope for what this trial had given her.

“I feel a universal sense of gratitude — but also of hope for others,” she told The Washington Post. “Hope for all cancers.”

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A potentially life-saving cancer drug developed in Oklahoma https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-potentially-life-saving-cancer-drug-developed-in-oklahoma/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:18:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-potentially-life-saving-cancer-drug-developed-in-oklahoma/ A potentially life-saving new drug for cancer patients has been developed in Oklahoma. The drug is now approved by the Food and Drug Administration for a human trial taking place at the Stevenson Cancer Center. The drug, called OK-1, has been in the works for more than 25 years, developed by a researcher at UO […]]]>

A potentially life-saving new drug for cancer patients has been developed in Oklahoma. The drug is now approved by the Food and Drug Administration for a human trial taking place at the Stevenson Cancer Center. The drug, called OK-1, has been in the works for more than 25 years, developed by a researcher at UO College of Medicine. And something like that can impact Oklahoma, but it can also impact the world,” said Dr. Doris Benbrook, the creator of OK-1. Benbrook said the drug is designed to treat cancer without dangerous side effects.” We’re very hopeful that it won’t harm patients, it won’t cause side effects,” Benbrook said. For now, the drug is given to women with advanced stage ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer. Once, a cancer patient, who is currently undergoing another clinical trial at OU, said that these trials save lives. patient in a separate study. The drug will be delivered in capsule form, and Benbrook said it may even have the ability to prevent cancer.

A potentially life-saving new drug for cancer patients has been developed in Oklahoma.

The drug is now approved by the Food and Drug Administration for a human trial taking place at the Stevenson Cancer Center.

The drug, called OK-1, has been in the works for more than 25 years, developed by a researcher at the OU College of Medicine.

“It’s so meaningful to be able to take on your life’s work and know that you’ve had an impact. And something like that can impact Oklahoma, but it can also impact the world,” said Dr. Doris Benbrook, the creator of OK. -1.

Benbrook said the drug is designed to treat cancer without dangerous side effects.

“We’re very hopeful that it won’t harm patients, it won’t cause side effects,” Benbrook said.

For now, the drug is given to women with advanced stage ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer. Once, a cancer patient, who is currently undergoing another clinical trial at UO, said that these trials save lives.

“Even if it doesn’t help the individual…you are still collectively helping other people,” said Dena Nowlun, a clinical trial patient in a separate study.

The drug will be delivered in capsule form, and Benbrook said it may even have the potential to prevent cancer.

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Skin cancer patients benefiting from the NHS will receive a new drug, cemiplimab, which will change their lives https://parentraide-cancer.org/skin-cancer-patients-benefiting-from-the-nhs-will-receive-a-new-drug-cemiplimab-which-will-change-their-lives/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 22:33:52 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/skin-cancer-patients-benefiting-from-the-nhs-will-receive-a-new-drug-cemiplimab-which-will-change-their-lives/ NHS patients battling a deadly form of a common skin cancer will now be given a drug that can banish tumors for twice as long as current treatments. Cemiplimab will be available for hundreds of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma who have not responded to surgery and radiation therapy. The disease, the second most […]]]>

NHS patients battling a deadly form of a common skin cancer will now be given a drug that can banish tumors for twice as long as current treatments.

Cemiplimab will be available for hundreds of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma who have not responded to surgery and radiation therapy.

The disease, the second most common skin cancer, is not normally life-threatening and relatively easy to treat, but in rare cases it spreads to other parts of the body and becomes fatal.

Previously, only a handful of people could access cemiplimab in a clinical trial. Now Britain’s medicines watchdog, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), has decided it will be available to all NHS patients when their illness starts to spread.

The decision follows striking trial data which revealed that half of patients taking cemiplimab have lived for at least two years. Typically, experts say those at this stage of the disease don’t survive more than a year. Previous trials have shown that the drug shrinks tumors by more than 30%.

NHS patients battling a deadly form of a common skin cancer will now be given a drug that can banish tumors for twice as long as current treatments. Cemiplimab will be available for hundreds of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma who have not responded to surgery and radiation therapy. (File Image)

Dr Andrew Sykes, consultant clinical oncologist at the Christie NHS Foundation Trust in Manchester, said: ‘Before this drug arrived, these patients were often sentenced to life imprisonment and rarely survived longer than a year. But now we see patients in our clinic who have been taking this drug for at least two years and who are still healthy. It is truly life changing.

Around 28,000 people in the UK are diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma each year. The vast majority of cases are caused by damage to the skin caused by UV rays, whether from the sun or from tanning booths. The cancer appears as a small, firm, pink lump, usually on the face or neck. The patch then becomes rough and crusty, tender to the touch and may bleed.

The disease rarely spreads – unlike melanoma skin cancer, the most common form, which kills around 2,300 Britons each year. Usually, squamous cell carcinoma is detected early and successfully treated with a small procedure to remove the lesion. It can be sliced ​​or frozen, using extremely cold liquid nitrogen. Most patients also receive radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells.

Hollywood star Diane Keaton, now 76, successfully had squamous cell carcinoma removed from her face in middle age and has since become an advocate for sun protection.

But in around 1,000 cases each year in the UK, the cancer recurs elsewhere in the body, where it is aggressive and difficult to treat. The disease is also likely to spread if not detected early enough, as is the case for around 600 patients each year.

Hollywood star Diane Keaton (above), now 76, successfully had squamous cell carcinoma removed from her face in middle age and has since become a sun safety advocate

Hollywood star Diane Keaton (above), now 76, successfully had squamous cell carcinoma removed from her face in middle age and has since become a sun safety advocate

Before the advent of cemiplimab, doctors could do little for advanced disease – chemotherapy usually prolonged life by only a few months.

Cemiplimab works by blocking proteins on the surface of a cancer cell that help it hide from the immune system. The fighting cells of the body can then quickly detect and destroy it. Treatment continues for up to two years or until the treatment stops working. A very small number may quit due to serious side effects – the drug affects the immune system, which can make patients susceptible to infections.

“For the vast majority, side effects are mild – things like fatigue, itchy rashes and pain are common,” Dr Sykes said.

One patient to have benefited from the drug is retired engineer William Rankin, of Standish in Lancashire. The grandfather of two, now 80, was diagnosed with skin cancer in 2017 after his dentist noticed a lump on the top of his head.

William had three lumps removed and underwent radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells, but the cancer spread to his lungs, liver and lymph nodes under his arms.

In November 2019, William was referred to The Christie and offered cemiplimab. He stopped treatment in November 2021, having reached the two-year limit, and today remains cancer-free.

“This drug gave me a lifeline,” says William. “I know that if I hadn’t had it, I might not be here today, and it’s heartening that others are now enjoying the same.”

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