Cancer prevention – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:00:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer prevention – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Depletion of depleted T cells allows memory T cells to be activated and fight blood cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/depletion-of-depleted-t-cells-allows-memory-t-cells-to-be-activated-and-fight-blood-cancer/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:00:25 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/depletion-of-depleted-t-cells-allows-memory-t-cells-to-be-activated-and-fight-blood-cancer/ Finding cures for cancer or other diseases can often be a matter of taking two steps forward and one step back, where beneficial treatments may improve outcomes, but create an additional problem to solve. Bone marrow transplants (BMT) have transformed the treatment of blood cancers by replacing diseased blood stem cells with healthy ones. An […]]]>

Finding cures for cancer or other diseases can often be a matter of taking two steps forward and one step back, where beneficial treatments may improve outcomes, but create an additional problem to solve. Bone marrow transplants (BMT) have transformed the treatment of blood cancers by replacing diseased blood stem cells with healthy ones. An added benefit of BMT is that immune cells from the transplanted donor are often able to help fight cancer cells. Unfortunately, not all cancers respond well to these donated immune cells. In reactive blood cancers such as leukemia, donor (or graft) T cells effectively attack tumor cells, referred to as an effective “graft versus tumor” response. In contrast, cancers like myeloma are inherently resistant to this therapy. So what makes blood cancer cells susceptible to detection and destruction by donor immune cells? That’s the question being investigated by researchers in the lab of Dr. Geoffrey Hill, a professor in the Division of Clinical Research and director of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and the Fred Hutch Center for Integrated Immunotherapy Research. In their recent Sciences Immunology study led by postdoctoral researcher Dr. Simone Minnie, researchers found that this resistance in myeloma was caused by the functional depletion of donor T cells by exposure to foreign antigens on recipient cells, rather than by fighting against tumor cells. When Minnie figured out how to fix this T-cell depletion problem, she encountered a new one – the remaining T-cells weren’t in an activated tumor-fighting state. Using creative approaches, Hill researchers found an innovative way to activate these T cells and developed a potential therapeutic approach to combat these difficult-to-treat blood cancers.

To understand what renders certain cancers insensitive to the beneficial graft-vs-tumor response after bone marrow transplantation, Dr. Minnie has developed reactive (leukemia) and resistant (myeloma) preclinical models. The researchers predicted that one reason for this difference in response to treatment could be that myeloma causes donor T cells to become exhausted, which can happen if the T cells aren’t able to fight a cancer fast enough. and become functionally depleted and less effective in killing malignant cells. The authors profiled T cells several weeks after bone marrow transplantation from healthy donor mice (known as allogeneic bone marrow transplantation). In the absence of cancer, the transplanted T cells were exposed to unknown host antigens, or alloantigens, which “resulted in an exhausted T cell phenotype, characterized by high expression of inhibitory receptors on CD8+ T cells,” explains Minnie. Excitingly, they found that “myeloma tumors resistant to graft-versus-tumor effects expressed high levels of complementary inhibitory ligands,” compared to leukemic cells. This indicated that myeloma cells selectively expressed proteins that may be able to shut down the tumor-fighting ability of T cells and promote immune evasion. However, when they tried to block this inhibitory action of myeloma cells, the researchers found that it was still not enough to induce graft versus tumor responses in mouse models of myeloma.

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NHL gearing up for Hockey Fights Cancer Moment of Silence on Saturday https://parentraide-cancer.org/nhl-gearing-up-for-hockey-fights-cancer-moment-of-silence-on-saturday/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:01:04 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/nhl-gearing-up-for-hockey-fights-cancer-moment-of-silence-on-saturday/ Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports The National Hockey League is set to take a league-wide hiatus this weekend for a moment of silence in recognition of Hockey Fights Cancer and those lost to the disease. Over the past 24 years, Hockey Fights Cancer has raised awareness and over $32 million to support families and cancer patients. […]]]>

The National Hockey League is set to take a league-wide hiatus this weekend for a moment of silence in recognition of Hockey Fights Cancer and those lost to the disease.

Over the past 24 years, Hockey Fights Cancer has raised awareness and over $32 million to support families and cancer patients. Although cancer is a problem that affects millions of people around the world, the disease also directly affects the world of hockey, including the recent deaths of legends Mike Bossy, Dale Hawerchuk and Guy Lafleur.

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Mandarin Oriental Doha supports the Qatar Cancer Society https://parentraide-cancer.org/mandarin-oriental-doha-supports-the-qatar-cancer-society/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 07:04:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/mandarin-oriental-doha-supports-the-qatar-cancer-society/ Doha: To honor October in support of Breast Cancer Awareness, Mandarin Oriental, Doha donated to the Qatar Cancer Society for the third consecutive year. This contribution follows a pledge made to donate a portion of the proceeds from every afternoon tea sold in October 2022 dedicated to breast cancer research and treatment in Qatar.Mandarin Oriental, […]]]>

Doha: To honor October in support of Breast Cancer Awareness, Mandarin Oriental, Doha donated to the Qatar Cancer Society for the third consecutive year.

This contribution follows a pledge made to donate a portion of the proceeds from every afternoon tea sold in October 2022 dedicated to breast cancer research and treatment in Qatar.
Mandarin Oriental, Doha is recognized for excellence in service and is committed to operating responsibly and sustainably.

As a supporter of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, Mandarin Oriental, Doha seeks to contribute to the communities in which it operates and to responsibly manage its environmental impact and social engagement. On other occasions, he has also partnered with the Qatar Cancer Society since 2020 with various contributions and donations.

“The focus of this initiative stems from our aspiration to solidify our commitment to contributing and supporting our local communities.” said Martin Schnider, Managing Director of Mandarin Oriental, Doha. “Acting responsibly is one of our guiding principles and we seek to carry out our mission in a way that is sustainable, equitable and in harmony with our natural systems, believing that our continued success can only be achieved if we take care of our people and our planet,” he added.

Mona Ashkanani – Managing Director of Qatar Cancer Society (QCS) – appreciated the efforts of Mandarin Oriental, Doha in the field of charitable and humanitarian work, especially in the health sector, and the support of QCS outreach activities .

She expressed her gratitude for the generous donation which will help further her mission of preventing cancer and reducing the burden of cancer by working with partners to educate the community and support, empower and advocate for people living with cancer and engage in development and scientific research. In the field.

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Flathead Business Journalists | Daily Inter Lake https://parentraide-cancer.org/flathead-business-journalists-daily-inter-lake/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 07:07:49 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/flathead-business-journalists-daily-inter-lake/ The bank makes donations to support breast cancer awareness Rocky Mountain Bank had made a total contribution of $10,000 to five local organizations across the state of Montana in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The bank has contributed to St. Vincent Healthcare’s Eva Project, the Cancer Support Community’s Mending the Mountains Program, Logan Health’s […]]]>


The bank makes donations to support breast cancer awareness

Rocky Mountain Bank had made a total contribution of $10,000 to five local organizations across the state of Montana in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The bank has contributed to St. Vincent Healthcare’s Eva Project, the Cancer Support Community’s Mending the Mountains Program, Logan Health’s Save A Sister Fund, Clark Fork Valley Hospital, and the Ava Nichole Breast Health Fund of the Missoula Foundation for Community Health. These donations are made possible through the bank’s Pink Ribbon debit card program.

Through its special Pink Ribbon debit card program, Rocky Mountain Bank donates up to $10,000 annually to Montana nonprofit organizations involved in breast cancer prevention or patient care. Funds are based on the number of Pink Ribbon debit card transactions made by Rocky Mountain Bank customers.

The money was distributed to the following organizations

• $3,000 to St. Vincent Healthcare – Billing

• $2,500 to the Cancer Support Community – Bozeman

• $2,000 to the Logan Health Logan Health Save A Sister Fund. The goals of the initiative are to improve women’s access to screening mammography, educate the community, and promote breast cancer awareness and prevention through outreach activities. Save a Sister also covers postoperative durable goods which are often not covered by insurance. All funds remain in the local Flathead Valley region.

• $1,500 to Clark Fork Valley Hospital

• $1,000 to the Missoula Community Health Foundation

RE/MAX Whitefish offers free ski helmets

RE/MAX Whitefish launches its fifth year of “Lids for Kids”. The company partners with Sportman’s Ski Haus, Mann Mortgage, Insured Titles and Smith to provide free ski and snowboard helmets to school-aged children in the Flathead Valley.

The ultimate goal is to keep children safe while enjoying the slopes. With rising costs, safety shouldn’t be a concern for parents when it comes to getting their kids on the mountain. Stop by RE/MAX Whitefish for your child’s fitting on Thursdays between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. until December 22. Helmets are available in sizes youth small to adult large. For questions regarding the Lids for Kids program, contact RE/MAX Whitefish at 406-863-3400 or visit www.remax-whitefish-mt.com.

Management of Morrison-Maierle’s Kalispell and Great Falls Coal Mines

Morrison-Maierle’s offices in Kalispell and Great Falls have combined management into a regional unit.

Under the leadership of current Kalispell COO, Ryan Jones PE, the newly formed regional unit will maximize the resources and talent of these two offices to better serve Morrison-Maierle customers.

“As a multidisciplinary engineering firm, this regional unit will be able to better serve our customers with the wide range of skills we offer. We look forward to sharing this news with our customers and the communities we serve,” said Carl Anderson, Chief Operating Officer of Morrison-Maierle.

Expanded services resulting from the regional unit include water and wastewater design and engineering, natural resources, airport engineering, land development engineering, industrial engineering and design of buildings.

Founded in 1945, Morrison-Maierle has 12 offices in Wyoming, Montana, Oregon and Washington, including four in Wyoming: Casper, Cody, Gillette and Sheridan. As a multidisciplinary firm, it offers services in engineering, surveying, planning and natural sciences.

Moors & Cabot opens an office in Kalispell

Moors & Cabot, a Boston, Massachusetts-based investment firm established in 1890, opens its new office in Kalispell. Jay Flynn and David Sutherland bring over 60 years of combined financial industry experience with a focus on personalized and comprehensive financial planning, portfolio management, strategic retirement income generation and family wealth transfer services to our Kalispell office.

Located at 100 Cooperative Way, Suite #202 Kalispell, Jay and David are available Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (or by appointment in the evening) for a free introductory meeting. For more information, visit https://www.moorscabot.com/locations/Kalispell.

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CDC to conduct health study at polluted former military base https://parentraide-cancer.org/cdc-to-conduct-health-study-at-polluted-former-military-base/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 19:06:29 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cdc-to-conduct-health-study-at-polluted-former-military-base/ Federal health officials are conducting a new study to determine whether veterans once stationed at a now closed California military base were exposed to dangerously high levels of cancer-causing toxins. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s decision comes nine months after an Associated Press investigation discovered that drinking water in Fort Ord contained toxic […]]]>

Federal health officials are conducting a new study to determine whether veterans once stationed at a now closed California military base were exposed to dangerously high levels of cancer-causing toxins.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s decision comes nine months after an Associated Press investigation discovered that drinking water in Fort Ord contained toxic chemicals and that hundreds of veterans who lived on California’s central coast in the 1980s and 1990s later developed rare, stage-stage blood cancers terminal.

In a letter last Friday to Rep. Katie Porter, D-California, CDC Agency Director for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Patrick Breysse wrote that “there is enough scientific data and reason for the ATSDR to reassess the health risks associated with historic drinking water exposures in Fort Ord. Porter had requested a new study in February, two days after the AP published its story.

The agency did not immediately respond to a request asking for more details about the new study.

Army veteran Julie Akey, who lived in Fort Ord and was diagnosed in 2016 at age 46 with multiple myeloma, a rare blood cancer, said she was “convinced that science will prove that our high rate of cancer and disease is no coincidence. ”

Akey started a Facebook group for Fort Ord veterans with cancer. The number has risen to nearly 1,000.

In 1990, four years before the closure process began as an active military base, Fort Ord was added to the Environmental Protection Agency’s list of the most polluted places in the country. This pollution included dozens of chemicals, some of which are now known to cause cancer, which have been found in the base’s drinking water and soil.

The AP’s review of public documents showed the military knew chemicals had been improperly dumped at Fort Ord for decades. Even after the contamination was documented, the military downplayed the risks.

One of these chemicals was trichlorethylene, or TCE, which was known as a miracle degreaser and was widely used in Fort Ord. The Army found TCE in Fort Ord wells 43 times from 1985 to 1994and 18 of these tests showed that TCE exceeded legal safety limits.

The new health study will update a study conducted more than 25 years ago. The previous ATSDR public health study, published in 1996, found that toxins in the soil and in aquifers beneath Fort Ord were not likely to pose a past, present, or future threat to those who live there.

But that conclusion was based on limited data provided by the military and before medical science understood the relationship between certain chemical exposures and cancer, especially TCE. Four years after the ATSDR’s assessment, in 2000 the Department of Health and Human Services added TCE to its list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

It is not known how long and in what concentrations TCE may have been in the water before 1985, when hundreds of thousands of people lived on the base. And TCE wasn’t the only problem. The EPA has identified more than 40 “chemicals of concern” in soil and groundwater.

The Department of Veterans Affairs told the AP earlier this year that contamination was “within the permitted safe range” in areas that provided drinking water.

Veterans who lived in Fort Ord and have since attempted to seek medical care or disability benefits through the VA due to their cancers have been repeatedly denied. Akey and others hope the new study will find a link between their cancers and their stay in Fort Ord, allowing them to obtain care and benefits.

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Contact the AP Global Investigation Team at Investigative@ap.org or https://www.ap.org/tips/.

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Breast cancer screening, your safe bet to win the fight https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-cancer-screening-your-safe-bet-to-win-the-fight/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 00:00:15 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-cancer-screening-your-safe-bet-to-win-the-fight/ Breast screening aims for early diagnosis and prompt treatment and therefore improves prognosis and outcome. [iStockhoto] She had mixed emotions after developing a pimple on her left breast. The shock and pain forced Mary Nyambura, 45, of Pipeline in Nakuru, to seek medicine. She was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer. It was her first […]]]>
Breast screening aims for early diagnosis and prompt treatment and therefore improves prognosis and outcome. [iStockhoto]

She had mixed emotions after developing a pimple on her left breast.

The shock and pain forced Mary Nyambura, 45, of Pipeline in Nakuru, to seek medicine. She was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer.

It was her first breast cancer screening. She was placed on chemotherapy and after completion she underwent a mastectomy.

“Cancer took me by surprise. I would have liked to be gentle with myself by undergoing regular screenings. Maybe the cancer cell could have been caught earlier,” says Mary, who was diagnosed in October 2020.

Now she gets regular medical checkups at Nakuru Level Five Hospital Cancer Unit.

“The disease brings a lot of fear and emotion, but hope keeps me going.”

Mary is not the only breast cancer patient in old age, hundreds of women in Kenya are diagnosed with stage three and four breast cancer.

Data from the Kenya National Cancer Registry 2014-19 (KNCR) shows that seven out of 10 cancers are diagnosed at advanced stages (stage three and stage four). Additional data from the National Cancer Institute of Kenya (NCIK) shows that breast cancer is the leading type in Kenya with an estimated 6,799 cases per year, contributing 12.5% ​​of the overall cancer burden.

Breast cancer is responsible for more than 3,107 deaths, making it the second leading cause of all cancer deaths in the country. At least seven women die every day in Kenya from breast cancer. However, Ruth Muia, head of the Department of Cancer Prevention and Care Spectrum at NCIK, said nearly 70% of breast cancer cases in Kenya are diagnosed late when the chances of curative treatment are low.

“Breast cancer is curable if detected early, but the majority of patients present in stages three and four when the cancer cells have spread, making it difficult to treat and cure,” Muia said.

Data from the Kenya National Cancer Registry 2014-2019 (KNCR) shows that only about 25% of Kenyan women aged 15-49 have had a breast self-exam, while 14% have undergone a clinical breast exam. breasts (KDHS, 2014).

Breast screening aims for early diagnosis and prompt treatment and therefore improves prognosis and outcome. [iStockhoto]

According to the report, examination for cancer is likely to be lower among women in rural areas as well as among those of low socioeconomic status.

For her part, Dr Juliet Maina, a clinical radiation oncologist at Nanyuki Teaching and Referral Hospital, said the country was grappling with breast cancer awareness as women feared “the unknown”. during screening.

Most women, she said, feel they would rather stick with it, only to be diagnosed at later stages when they cannot be cured. Breast screening aims for early diagnosis and prompt treatment and therefore improves prognosis and outcome.

“I am surprised that patients prefer not to know their status. They suspect, but they are afraid to get screened and examined,” Dr Maina said.

The clinical radiation oncologist explained that cancer screening can be done either by clinical examination, self-examination or mammography, an international screening modality for people over 40.

The test aims to identify healthy women who may have as yet undiagnosed or asymptomatic cancer, or who may have risk changes or precancerous changes in the breast that would signify an increased risk of breast cancer.

A mammogram uses low-energy X-rays to identify abnormal masses.

“It is compulsory for every woman over the age of 50 to have a mammogram every year, but very few people know about it, although breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and is associated with high mortality,” Dr Maina said. .

In 2016, the government, through the Managed Equipment Service (MES) project, introduced digital mammography machines distributed across 47 counties to aid in the diagnosis of the disease.

The installation of the machine was a major upgrade from the previous 11 analog mammography machines in public hospitals.

An impact study conducted by the ministry in 2018 showed that the decentralization of mammography has increased geographic access to services.

Cancer screening can be done by clinical examination, self-examination or mammography. [iStockphoto]

But even with the introduction of digital mammograms, screening remains low.

In Baringo, only 11 women were tested between February and September. County health officer Richard Rotich attributed the low uptake of screening to residents’ lack of information about the importance of cancer screening.

“It is worrying that people are afraid of cancer and therefore do not take screening seriously. There is misinformation that we are debunking that cancer is a death sentence,” Rotich said.

For her part, Maina said, “Most people don’t understand the concept of a mammogram, even the scholars and the elite. People have been reluctant over the years to get tested, a trend that is worrying”

The expert attributed the low participation in mammography examinations to the lack of specialists (a radiologist and oncologists), unlike the cervix which can be carried out by a clinician, doctors or nurses.

Related Topics

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Although rare, men can also get breast cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/although-rare-men-can-also-get-breast-cancer/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 23:13:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/although-rare-men-can-also-get-breast-cancer/ KUALA LUMPUR: Breast cancer is the number one killer disease for women in Malaysia, with one in 19 people at risk of being diagnosed with it. However, men are also prone to the disease. Statistically, the incidence and prevalence rate of breast cancer in men is lower than in women, with only one case diagnosed […]]]>

KUALA LUMPUR: Breast cancer is the number one killer disease for women in Malaysia, with one in 19 people at risk of being diagnosed with it. However, men are also prone to the disease.

Statistically, the incidence and prevalence rate of breast cancer in men is lower than in women, with only one case diagnosed for every 100 cases.

Vignesvari Subramaniam, a physician in charge of the care awareness program at the National Cancer Society Malaysia, said that besides age, hereditary genetics and poor lifestyle choices, differences in breast cancer risk factors between men and women are quite distinct.

“In men, testicular conditions determine the risk factor for men to develop breast cancer. This could be caused by chromosomal conditions like Klinefelter syndrome affecting testicular growth, testicular infection, any surgery performed on the testicles or the removal of the testicles,” she said.

Men with Klinefelter syndrome are born with an extra “X” chromosome, which negatively affects testicular growth, leading to a drop in testosterone production, which causes a hormonal imbalance that can trigger breast cancer.

Vignesvari stated that changes and alterations in the body of men can lead to a hormonal imbalance of the estrogen to androgen ratio.

“When the testicles are removed, the level of estrogen in a man’s body becomes higher relative to androgens, creating a higher risk of breast cancer,” she said. the sun.

She said the first step in prevention is self-examination.

“If there are identified painless bumps around the areola, it is advisable to go see a doctor.”

In some cases, male breast cancer is preventable.

“Modifiable” risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle, smoking and alcohol consumption habits, and poor diet can be redirected to reduce breast cancer risk.

“However, for non-modifiable risk factors such as genetics, getting medical treatment is most viable.”

Vignesvari added that the “grading and stages” of breast cancer are roughly similar for men and women.

Once cancer cells have formed, the metacystic stage occurs similarly in both men and women, where surrounding organs such as the lungs, liver, brain, lymph nodes as well as structures such as the bones of the sternum are affected.

“The path it takes and the parasitic nature of cancer are the same in both sexes, although the starting points of the cells are different,” Vignesvari said.

Breast cancer treatments are categorized into two general methods, surgical and non-surgical, depending on the grade and stage of the tumor.

“Surgery for male patients will not involve lumpectomy – a mass removal procedure – due to low breast density. Instead, it will be total breast removal surgery called a mastectomy, to reduce the risk of recurrence.

“At the end of the day, always remember that prevention is better than cure and adopt a healthy lifestyle as the first step in breast cancer prevention.”

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UCSD Health offers treatment for urinary tract cancer that could prevent dialysis and kidney transplant https://parentraide-cancer.org/ucsd-health-offers-treatment-for-urinary-tract-cancer-that-could-prevent-dialysis-and-kidney-transplant/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 23:16:49 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/ucsd-health-offers-treatment-for-urinary-tract-cancer-that-could-prevent-dialysis-and-kidney-transplant/ In September, the first round of a new treatment for low-grade upper tract urothelial cancer (LG-UTUC) was completed for a patient at UC San Diego Health. Doctors at UCSD Health are now administering Jelmyto, the first drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for LG-UTUC. Jelmyto is a combination of mitomycin, an established chemotherapy […]]]>

In September, the first round of a new treatment for low-grade upper tract urothelial cancer (LG-UTUC) was completed for a patient at UC San Diego Health.

Doctors at UCSD Health are now administering Jelmyto, the first drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for LG-UTUC. Jelmyto is a combination of mitomycin, an established chemotherapy drug, and hydrogel, a water-soluble polymer developed for use in humans. This particular hydrogel is a liquid when cold, but a gel at body temperature, allowing doctors to deliver the cold medication in liquid form through a catheter. The drug then solidifies into a gel and stays in the treatment area for 4-6 hours.

LG-UTUC is a subtype of upper tract urothelial cancer that is less likely to spread to other parts of the body. Although metastasis, the spread of cancer in the body, is usually not a problem for this type of cancer, it can still cause problems in the urogenital tract by blocking the flow of urine.

These tumors are found in the epithelium of the kidneys and ureter, the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder. The standard of care for these tumors is often radical nephroureterectomy, which involves removing the kidney, ureter, and part of the bladder. Although there are alternative treatments to save the kidneys, such as endoscopic tumor removal – the removal of a tumor using a small camera – the urogenital tract is complex, which makes this difficult procedure.

In addition, each of these treatment methods – RNU and endoscopic tumor removal – has associated risks. URN is associated with long-term decreased kidney function and the development of chronic kidney disease, which is a risk factor for hospitalization, heart disease, and death. Endoscopic tumor removal has higher cancer recurrence rates than RNU.

Dr. Aditya Bagrodia, associate professor of urology and head of genitourinary oncology at UCSD Health, praised the work of UCSD health workers in making this treatment possible.

Bagrodia noted, “The required coordination of the cancer center, pharmacy, operating room, and urology administrative staff and the Herculean efforts of each of these parties is what makes this possible. a lot of work, but it is worth it for our patients.

According to Jelmyto’s website, the drug has been shown to be remarkably effective, as “58% of patients saw their tumors disappear after treatment with Jelmyto”, and one year after treatment, the majority of patients whose tumors disappeared were still cancer free. The effectiveness of Jelmyto makes endoscopic tumor removal using Jelmyto a more viable alternative to RNU.

Jelmyto is a great option for patients because it offers LG-UTUC patients the chance to preserve one of their kidneys. This further prevents other complications associated with kidney ablations such as dialysis, kidney transplant, and kidney disease.

While it’s too early to tell how effective the treatment will be for patients at UCSD Health, Bagrodia is “optimistic that our patients will do well.”

Jelmyto was approved for use by the FDA in April 2020, but the rarity of the disease and an intensive drug administration schedule delayed its use at UCSD. According to the FDA, 6,000 to 8,000 cases of LG-UTUC are diagnosed each year in the United States. UTUC affects approximately 2 people per 100,000 people each year, and LG-UTUC accounts for 30% of UTUC patients.

Illustration by Allen Chen for the UCSD Guardian

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Circadian rhythm disruptions linked to increased risk of lung cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/circadian-rhythm-disruptions-linked-to-increased-risk-of-lung-cancer/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 18:11:43 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/circadian-rhythm-disruptions-linked-to-increased-risk-of-lung-cancer/ Share on PinterestA new study has found that chronic jet lag disrupts the expression of the body’s sleep-wake cycle and increases the risk of lung cancer in mice. LeoPatrizi/Getty Images The researchers studied the effects of circadian disruption in a mouse model of lung cancer. They found that chronic jet lag disrupts the expression of […]]]>

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A new study has found that chronic jet lag disrupts the expression of the body’s sleep-wake cycle and increases the risk of lung cancer in mice. LeoPatrizi/Getty Images
  • The researchers studied the effects of circadian disruption in a mouse model of lung cancer.
  • They found that chronic jet lag disrupts the expression of clock genes and increases tumor burden.
  • They also identified a mechanism involving heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) genes that potentially underlies the increased rate of tumor formation in chronically shifted mice.
  • The results demonstrate that HSF1 is a potential therapeutic target to prevent cancer risk in people exposed to chronic circadian disturbances, such as shift workers.

The biological clocks of almost every cell in the body regulate your sleep-wake rhythm over a 24-hour period.

This pattern is known as the circadian rhythm and is underpinned by a molecular feedback loop – the transcription-translation feedback loop – involving specific genes and their protein products.

Lifestyle factors, such as shift work and traveling across time zones, can disrupt circadian rhythms.

Recently, a team of scientists from the Scripps Institute and the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute discovered another piece of the puzzle – a potential genetic link between lung tumor growth and disrupted circadian rhythms.

The results of this study were published in Scientists progress.

In addition to being responsible for the well-known symptoms of jet lag, circadian rhythm disruption has also been linked to:

Several studies in human and animal models have indicated that the circadian clock also plays a role in the genesis and progression of cancer.

It is important to note, however, that the carcinogenic potential of circadian disruption is still under debate.

In June 2019, a working group from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified night shift work as a probable human carcinogen.

Yet a 2021 review co-authored by biochemist and Nobel laureate Dr. Aziz Sancar concluded that “the jury is still out on whether circadian disruption can promote cancer in general” due to insufficient data.

In this study, the researchers used KrasG12D mouse, a genetically modified mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer.

To induce chronic jet lag in the test group, the researchers housed the mice in a modified light-dark scheme that mimicked the effects of rotating shift work or frequent eastbound transmeridian flights.

Control mice were housed under typical lighting conditions: 12 hours light and 12 hours dark.

As expected, the researchers found that chronic jet lag disrupted the expression of genes that regulate circadian rhythm (called clock genes) in the lungs, liver and, to a lesser extent, the spleen.

The researchers observed a 68% increase in tumor burden in K mice with chronic jet lag compared to control mice 25 weeks after infection (20 weeks in the chronic jet lag group).

The higher tumor burden was due to an increase in the number of tumors rather than their size, indicating that in this model, chronic jet lag influences early events in tumor progression.

“While several studies have convincingly demonstrated an association between shift work and breast cancer, a few studies suggest this may also be the case for lung cancer, particularly in smokers,” said Frederic Gachon, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Queensland’s Institute of Molecular Bioscience, not involved in the study, said Medical News Today.

“Nevertheless, the mechanisms are still poorly understood.”

“This study proposes a novel mechanism linking disrupted rhythmic activation of HSF1 [heat shock factor 1] pathway implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation and the increased burden of lung tumors. This suggests that shift workers, particularly smokers, should implement behavioral or nutritional interventions and regular medical conduct.

– Frédéric Gachon, Ph.D., molecular biologist

Based on the results of previous studies, the researchers hypothesized that the oncoprotein c-MYC may be related to increased tumor burden in chronic jet lag. (The c-MYC oncoprotein is a regulatory gene that deregulates in many forms of human cancer.)

But the new study reported that “unexpectedly, chronic jet lag resulted in significantly reduced c-MYC accumulation in KrasG12D– entrained lung tumors.

When the researchers analyzed tumors and tumor-bearing lung tissue, they noticed that chronic jet lag increased the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) target genes.

“In this study, we showed that gene expression associated with increased [body] temperature is increased in samples taken from animals exposed to circadian disruptions,” said Katja Lamia, Ph.D., associate professor of molecular medicine at Scripps Research and lead author of the study. DTM.

“And other [studies in] people have shown that these genes are associated with increased tumor formation in several types of cancer.

One implication we are excited about is the possibility of using non-invasive measurement of body temperature to monitor shift workers and identify those who may be at particular risk of the adverse health effects of circadian disruptions.

– Katja Lamia, Ph.D., lead study author

The researchers also found that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of HSF1 reduces the growth of KRAS mutant human lung cancer cells, paving the way for a potential cancer preventive treatment for people whose circadian rhythms are frequently disrupted.

Asked about the limitations of the study, Dr. Gachon pointed out:

“This is a mouse model of lung cancer that mimics a subtype of lung cancer. Nevertheless, it has been shown to bear significant similarity to the development of lung cancer in humans.

He added that “the role of HSF1 inhibition on cancer cell proliferation has only been assessed in vitro. An in-vivo experience [w]would have been great (if possible).”

According to Dr Lamia, while the new study showed the impact of circadian disruption on the expression of genes linked to elevated body temperature, the study “did not actually demonstrate that body temperature is affected by circadian disruption or that these changes are necessary for the increased tumor burden we observed in mice exposed to circadian disruption.

  1. What happens to body temperature in mice (and people) exposed to circadian disruption?
  2. If we genetically inactivate elevated pathways by elevated temperature that we have seen activated in response to circadian disruption, will this prevent the increase in tumor burden that we have measured in mice exposed to circadian disruption?
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Mary J. Blige and Jill Biden team up for cancer prevention https://parentraide-cancer.org/mary-j-blige-and-jill-biden-team-up-for-cancer-prevention/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 20:00:33 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/mary-j-blige-and-jill-biden-team-up-for-cancer-prevention/ WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration’s initiative to boost cancer prevention and treatment has received a dose of celebrity support… WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration’s initiative to boost cancer prevention and treatment received a dose of celebrity support Monday when singer Mary J. Blige joined Jill Biden and the American Cancer Society to announce […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration’s initiative to boost cancer prevention and treatment has received a dose of celebrity support…

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration’s initiative to boost cancer prevention and treatment received a dose of celebrity support Monday when singer Mary J. Blige joined Jill Biden and the American Cancer Society to announce national meetings on breast and cervical cancer.

The cancer society pledged to call the events after President Joe Biden and the first lady resurrected the “cancer moonshot” initiative this year. The program provides more money for research to, as Jill Biden put it, “help us end cancer as we know it. For real.”

R&B superstar Blige has said she has lost aunts and other family members to breast, cervical and lung cancer. She has promoted breast cancer screening, especially among black women who are disproportionately affected, through the black women’s health imperative.

On Monday, Blige blamed misconceptions about mammograms for black women and “the practice of not wanting other people in our business” for disparities in breast cancer outcomes between blacks and whites.

She said she was convinced that if her aunts, godmother and grandparents had known about the cancer, “they would have a different outcome today”. She stopped several times to stay calm.

The first lady reached Blige as the Grammy Award-winning singer returned to her seat. They held hands for several minutes before Biden, whose adult son Beau died of brain cancer in 2015, thanked Blige for “lending your powerful voice to this cause.”

The first lady said the administration’s cancer control initiative will help encourage collaboration and research, invest in new treatments and therapies, and help people get the best care and support for their relatives.

She said it was about creating “a future where we don’t have to be afraid of the word cancer anymore”.

The American Cancer Society said the roundtables will bring together doctors, scientists and other professionals with leading organizations to work to make progress against cancer. They are to start this week, said Karen Knudsen, the CEO.

Breast cancer is the number one cancer in women and the number one cause of death among black and Latino women. More than 14,000 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer this year, resulting in more than 4,000 deaths, she said.

Knudsen said the meetings will help “end breast and cervical cancer as we know it for everyone.”

Since becoming first lady, Jill Biden has traveled the country to learn about advances in cancer research and encourage people, especially women, to catch up on the screenings they skipped during the pandemic.

Her cancer advocacy began in the 1990s, after four of her friends were diagnosed with breast cancer.

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