Cancer prevention – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 01:38:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer prevention – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Cancer: The Popular Food That May Increase Risk Of Deadly Disease https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-the-popular-food-that-may-increase-risk-of-deadly-disease/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-the-popular-food-that-may-increase-risk-of-deadly-disease/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 14:58:38 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-the-popular-food-that-may-increase-risk-of-deadly-disease/ Figures suggest that increased consumption of certain foods is linked to an increase in cancer – especially those that are ultra-foods, packed with additives and preservatives. However, other apparently healthier foods could release toxic chemicals classified as “carcinogenic” when cooked at high temperatures. Potatoes contain higher levels of acrylamide, a chemical used in a wide […]]]>

Figures suggest that increased consumption of certain foods is linked to an increase in cancer – especially those that are ultra-foods, packed with additives and preservatives. However, other apparently healthier foods could release toxic chemicals classified as “carcinogenic” when cooked at high temperatures.

Potatoes contain higher levels of acrylamide, a chemical used in a wide range of industrial processes, including water purification.

According to the American Cancer Society, the chemical is also used in the textile, food processing, plastic and agricultural industries.

During the cooking process, the sugars and amino acids in potatoes work together, producing thousands of different chemicals.

Starchy foods in particular contain a higher concentration of acrylamide when cooked at temperatures above 120 ° C.

READ MORE: Person with blood cancer says diagnosis was “worse than anything I imagined” – his symptoms

The chemical has also been found in breads, breakfast cereals, cookies, and coffee.

When ingested, acrylamide turns into another compound known as glycidamide, which has been shown to bind to DNA and cause mutations – one of the key processes leading to the spread. cancer cells.

To date, studies probing the compound’s effect on animals have concluded that it could cause a variety of cancers.

Emma Shields, of the Cancer Research UK charity, told New Scientist: “Although evidence from animal studies has shown that acrylamide in food may be linked to cancer, this link is not clear. and consistent in humans.

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“It’s important to remember that there are many well-established factors like smoking, obesity and alcohol, all of which have a big impact on the number of cancer cases in the UK.

“As a safety measure, people can reduce their exposure by eating a normal, healthy and balanced diet, which includes eating less high-calorie foods like crisps, crisps and cookies, which are a major source of disease. ‘acrylamide’. “

The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies acrylamide as a probable human carcinogen, while the United States National Toxicology Program classifies it as “reasonably expected to be a human carcinogen.”

A 2015 study of the chemical found it was linked to damage to the nervous and reproductive system.

The blood test, which is being launched by the NHS, will be part of the world’s largest trial, involving more than 100,000 volunteers.

When a tumor is detected at the earliest stage, patients are five to ten times more likely to survive.

NHS England chief executive Amanda Pritchard said the test could mark the start of a revolution in cancer detection and treatment.

Professor Peter Sasieni, director of the Cancer Research UK cancer prevention testing unit and King’s College London, said: “We need to carefully study the Galleri test to see if it can significantly reduce the number of cancers diagnosed. at an advanced stage. “


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Use of TNF inhibitors and the risk of related follicular lymphoma in patients with RA https://parentraide-cancer.org/use-of-tnf-inhibitors-and-the-risk-of-related-follicular-lymphoma-in-patients-with-ra/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/use-of-tnf-inhibitors-and-the-risk-of-related-follicular-lymphoma-in-patients-with-ra/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:07:48 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/use-of-tnf-inhibitors-and-the-risk-of-related-follicular-lymphoma-in-patients-with-ra/ The authors explained that TNF is highly expressed in the joint tissue of RA patients, making it an attractive target for drug developers. TNF inhibitors have been shown to be effective in controlling RA and preventing progressive joint damage, but they also appear to have immunosuppressive effects which some believe may lead to a higher […]]]>

The authors explained that TNF is highly expressed in the joint tissue of RA patients, making it an attractive target for drug developers. TNF inhibitors have been shown to be effective in controlling RA and preventing progressive joint damage, but they also appear to have immunosuppressive effects which some believe may lead to a higher risk of certain cancers, especially those with infectious etiologies or immune, they said.

“This problem is particularly relevant for lymphomas and lung cancer, as patients with RA already have an increased risk of these cancers compared to the general population, possibly related to RA activity and immune stimulation. chronic, ”the authors wrote.

In hopes of better understanding and quantifying the potential for excessive cancer risk in RA patients who take TNF inhibitors, the authors searched the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Medicare database, which links the data from 18 central cancer registries to Medicare data. They sought to identify patients who were first diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 66 and 99 between 2007 and 2015. A control group was created from a random 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries without cancer from the corresponding years. Patients with RA were identified within these groups.

A total of 10,263 patients with a first diagnosis of cancer were identified and compared to 30,475 controls without cancer.

An analysis of Medicare Part B and Part D claims showed that 16.2% of controls overall were exposed to TNF inhibitors. Among cancer patients, the percentage of exposure to TNF inhibitors ranged from 12.8% to 33.7%, depending on the site of the cancer.

Logistic regression showed that the use of TNF inhibitors was associated with an increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06-1.63) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (aOR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.06-1.56). Specifically, the data suggested that the risk of follicular lymphoma was much higher in patients with a history of exposure to TNF inhibitors (aOR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.63-4.24).

No increased risk was found for basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma or other subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, investigators said.

They noted that the relationship between TNF inhibitors and cancer is complex and that the existing literature is mixed, adding that they believe this is the first major study to find an increased risk of follicular lymphoma in patients who have taken TNF inhibitors.

The authors said their study had positive results in showing that there does not appear to be an increased risk of immunosuppression-related cancers, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and cancers associated with the human papillomavirus. Although the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer is relatively low, the authors said patients on TNF inhibitors should receive regular skin cancer screenings and advice on how to protect themselves from it. excessive exposure to the sun.

Their conclusion confirms that their findings on follicular lymphoma may help explain the association between lymphoma and TNF inhibitors reported in this study and others.

“Although these results may have an immune explanation, the lack of strong immunosuppression in RA patients treated with TNF [inhibitors] and the model of association with cancer suggests that other mechanisms may underlie this increased risk, ”they said.

Reference

D’Arcy ME, Beachler DC, Pfeiffer RM, et al. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and cancer risk in older Americans with rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer epidemiologic biomarkers Previous. Published online August 23, 2021. doi: 10.1158 / 1055-9965.EPI-21-0125


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ESMO: Studies show COVID vaccines are effective and safe for cancer patients, but jury is still out for key group https://parentraide-cancer.org/esmo-studies-show-covid-vaccines-are-effective-and-safe-for-cancer-patients-but-jury-is-still-out-for-key-group/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/esmo-studies-show-covid-vaccines-are-effective-and-safe-for-cancer-patients-but-jury-is-still-out-for-key-group/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:05:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/esmo-studies-show-covid-vaccines-are-effective-and-safe-for-cancer-patients-but-jury-is-still-out-for-key-group/ The world applauded last year when several injections of COVID-19 were found to be very effective in clinical trials. But, since cancer patients were excluded from the studies, questions have arisen about the effectiveness of injections in this group, especially for those on immunosuppressants. Today, a series of studies published at the 2021 virtual congress […]]]>

The world applauded last year when several injections of COVID-19 were found to be very effective in clinical trials. But, since cancer patients were excluded from the studies, questions have arisen about the effectiveness of injections in this group, especially for those on immunosuppressants.

Today, a series of studies published at the 2021 virtual congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) paint a clearer picture: benefit from an additional booster dose.

In a multicenter study of the US Veterans’ Health System (VA), researchers included vaccinated and unvaccinated cancer patients both on and off active therapy.

It is believed that these treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, could impact the immune system and make vaccines less effective, although injections are likely safe, according to the American Cancer Society. Last month, the FDA approved an additional dose or a third dose of mRNA for people with weakened immune systems, which includes cancer patients using immune-altering therapies.

RELATED: As Pfizer’s AdComm Recall Approaches, FDA Employees Say COVID Vaccines Are Already Working as Expected

In the VA study, veterans with solid or hematologic malignancies who have received systemic cancer treatment at least once since the end of 2010 were examined. The trial included an equal number of 29,152 vaccinated and unvaccinated patients in each arm.

With a median follow-up of 47 days, the overall efficacy of the vaccine was 58% two weeks after the second dose, according to the study. Specifically, patients who were on chemotherapy within three months before their first dose showed 57% efficacy. This figure jumped to 75% for those who had not taken systemic treatment for at least six months previously.

Read: Vaccines are an ‘effective strategy to prevent COVID-19 in cancer patients’, although that can be confused when it comes to patients on immunosuppressive therapy. The researchers suggested doing future trials to determine whether patients would benefit from post-vaccination boosters or serologic testing.

These results were similar to another study shared during ESMO, which found that the Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA jab in particular was almost as effective and safe in cancer patients compared to the general population.

The results were part of a subgroup analysis of Pfizer’s global Phase 3 studies, which included patients with a history of cancer, whether current or not. The most common solid cancers were breast, prostate and melanoma in more than 1,600 patients not receiving active immunosuppressive therapy.

Pfizer’s vaccine was 89.7% effective in patients 12 years of age and older, with three cases of COVID-19 reported in the vaccine arm and 27 reported in placebo recipients two weeks after their second dose.

This “compares favorably” to the overall effectiveness of Pfizer’s vaccine of 91.1%, the researchers determined. Although the injection had more side effects than the placebo, the most common reports were pain and fatigue at the injection site.

RELATED: ASCO and Friends Push for More Cancer Patients in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Israel, which has already started vaccinating cancer patients with Pfizer’s vaccine since January, has served largely as a barometer for the United States’ own vaccination efforts. In a third study presented to ESMO, 232 cancer patients under active treatment nationwide were recruited after being inoculated with Pfizer’s jab.

The researchers then collected serum after each dose and compared it to a cohort of healthcare workers of the same age. They also deployed questionnaires to determine adverse effects.

After a first dose, 29% of cancer patients were seropositive against 84% in the care group. After a second dose this climbed to 86% indicating that jab appears to be effective in terms of antibody production even though there is “a pronounced lag” between doses.

The researchers suggested doing more studies to find out how long the vaccine’s protection might last depending on the type of cancer treatment a patient is using.


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New program supports trauma survivors and promotes prevention https://parentraide-cancer.org/new-program-supports-trauma-survivors-and-promotes-prevention/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/new-program-supports-trauma-survivors-and-promotes-prevention/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 17:08:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/new-program-supports-trauma-survivors-and-promotes-prevention/ Project Self-Sufficiency announces the launch in October of a new series of workshops and discussions, “Pizza & PACEs”, designed to facilitate conversation on issues surrounding Positive and Negative Childhood Experiences (PACE). Trauma experts and guest speakers will discuss the impact of adverse childhood experiences on social, emotional and cognitive development, and offer tips and strategies […]]]>

Project Self-Sufficiency announces the launch in October of a new series of workshops and discussions, “Pizza & PACEs”, designed to facilitate conversation on issues surrounding Positive and Negative Childhood Experiences (PACE). Trauma experts and guest speakers will discuss the impact of adverse childhood experiences on social, emotional and cognitive development, and offer tips and strategies to build resilience. The interactive workshops will take place on Mondays from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., October 4 and 18, November 1 and 15 and December 6. Pizza will be provided; prior registration is required. All participants must be vaccinated against Covid-19.

Negative childhood experiences are widely recognized as falling into three distinct categories: abuse, neglect and dysfunction in the home. Smoking, alcoholism, drug use, absenteeism and lack of physical activity are examples of negative behaviors that would result from ACEs. These behaviors can cause a cascade of physical and mental health problems, from diabetes to cancer to thoughts of suicide. It is estimated that around 67% of the population had at least one adverse childhood experience.

The new Pizza & PACE sessions build on the work already underway at the Self-Sufficiency Project. The agency’s PACEs program brings together professionals, providers and parents who are committed to raising awareness of the impact of childhood trauma on youth development, victimization and future perpetration of violence, as well as health and opportunities throughout life.

“At Project Self-Sufficiency, we often meet individuals and families who have experienced varying levels of trauma,” says Deborah Berry-Toon, Executive Director of Project Self-Sufficiency. “With the new PACEs initiative, our goal is to help make our community a place where every child can thrive by providing education and training on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and by ensuring relationships and safe, stable and stimulating environments. “

In addition to hearing guest speakers, Pizza & PACEs workshop participants will learn about the Connections Matter program, a program funded by the New Jersey Department of Children and Families and led by Prevent Child Abuse New Jersey designed to engage providers, parents , and community members to make compassionate connections to improve resilience. The discussion will focus on the prevention of adverse childhood experiences and trauma and demonstrate how compassionate bonds serve as a primary buffer in the negative effects of trauma. The training is appropriate for parents and providers who raise and teach school-aged children.

Project Self-Sufficiency’s Pizza & PACE program is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Call 973-940-3500 to register. Project Self-Sufficiency is located at 127 Mill Street, Newton.

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Fruit fly research helps uncover new anticancer strategies https://parentraide-cancer.org/fruit-fly-research-helps-uncover-new-anticancer-strategies/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/fruit-fly-research-helps-uncover-new-anticancer-strategies/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 08:01:46 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/fruit-fly-research-helps-uncover-new-anticancer-strategies/ The experience of a fruit fly dying of cancer may seem like a far cry from that of a human with a potentially fatal tumor, but researchers at the University of California at Berkeley find commonalities between the two that could lead to ways of prolonging the life of cancer. the patients.Research on fruit flies […]]]>

The experience of a fruit fly dying of cancer may seem like a far cry from that of a human with a potentially fatal tumor, but researchers at the University of California at Berkeley find commonalities between the two that could lead to ways of prolonging the life of cancer. the patients.

Research on fruit flies is already pointing to a new anticancer strategy separate from the conventional goal of destroying tumor or cancer cells. Instead, research suggests that launching an attack on the destructive chemicals that cancer rejects could increase survival rates and improve patient health.

“It’s a really complementary way of thinking about therapy,” said
David Bilder, professor of molecular and cellular biology at UC Berkeley. “You are trying to help the host deal with the effects of the tumor, rather than killing the tumor itself.”

Jung Kim, a postdoctoral fellow at Bilder’s lab, recently discovered that tumors in fruit flies release a chemical that compromises the barrier between the bloodstream and the brain, leaving the two environments to mix – a recipe for disaster in many diseases, including infections, trauma and even obesity. In collaboration with the labs of Professors David Raulet and Kaoru Saijo of UC Berkeley, Kim and Bilder subsequently demonstrated that tumors in mice that release the same chemical, a cytokine called interleukin-6 (IL- 6), also make the blood-brain barrier leaky. .

Most importantly, they were able to prolong the lifespan of fruit flies and mice with malignant tumors by blocking the effect of the cytokine on the barrier.

“The IL-6 cytokine is known to cause inflammation. What’s new here is that this tumor-induced inflammation actually causes the blood-brain barrier to open. If we interfere with this opening process but leave the tumor alone, then the host can live much longer and healthier with the same tumor burden, ”Bilder said.

IL-6 plays other important roles in the body, so to benefit cancer patients, scientists should find a drug that blocks its action at the blood-brain barrier without altering its effects elsewhere. But such a drug could potentially extend the lifespan and lifespan of cancer patients, he said.

Six years ago, Bilder’s team discovered that tumors in fruit flies also release a substance that blocks the effects of insulin, providing a potential explanation for the atrophy of tissues called cachexia that kills a fifth. of all cancer patients. This work is now being explored by many laboratories around the world.

One of the benefits of helping the host fend off the effects of a tumor on tissues far from the tumor site is that it could potentially reduce or even eliminate the need for toxic drugs typically used to control tumors. These drugs also harm the patient, killing healthy cells as well as cancer cells.

Beyond these side effects, targeting tumor cells “also selects resistance within the tumor, because the tumor has genetic variability – a drug resistant clone appears which will then cause the cancer to recur,” he said. declared. “But if you could target the host cells, they have a stable genome and are not going to develop resistance to these drugs. This is our goal: to understand how the tumor affects the host and to attack the host side of the tumor-host dialogue.

Bilder and his colleagues published their work on
IL-6 disruption of the blood-brain barrier last week in the newspaper Development cell, and he wrote a examining the impact of fruit fly research on understanding tumor-host interactions which was published last month in the journal Nature Reviews Cancer. Their cachexia work published in 2015 in Development cell.

What Really Kills Cancer Patients?

Scientists still don’t know what causes the deaths of many cancer patients, Bilder said. Liver cancer, for example, clearly destroys the function of an organ that is essential for life. However, other organs, such as the skin or the ovaries, are less critical, but people also die from cancer in these sites, sometimes very quickly. And although cancers often metastasize to other organs – multiple organ failure is one of the leading causes of cancer death documented by doctors – Bilder wonders if that’s the whole story.

In fruit flies (top row) and mice (bottom row), cytokines (yellow arrow) released by distant tumors (red mass) break down a barrier that normally protects the brain. These leaks allow molecules circulating in the blood to invade the brain, as shown by the green dye that has diffused through the barrier (central column). The right column shows brains of flies and mice without tumors, which show no brain leaks. (UC Berkeley photo by Jung Kim and Hsiu-Chun Chuang)

“Many human cancers are metastatic, but that doesn’t change the basic question: why does cancer kill? he said. “If your tumor has metastasized to the lung, are you dying from lung failure or are you dying of something else?” “

For this reason, he works with non-metastatic tumors implanted in fruit flies and mice and looks for systemic effects, not just effects on the organ containing the tumor itself.

One of the systemic effects of cancer is cachexia, the inability to maintain weight, which results in muscle wasting even when the patient receives intravenous nutrition. While Bilder discovered a possible reason for this – cancers release a chemical that prevents insulin from storing energy in the body – other scientists have found additional substances released by cancers that may also be responsible. tissue atrophy.

Like cachexia, breaches in the blood brain barrier can be another long-range effect of tumors. In the new study, researchers found that blocking IL-6 activity at the blood-brain barrier increased the lifespan of flies with cancer by 45%. Laboratory mice must be euthanized before suffering and dying from experimental cancer, but the team found that after 21 days, 75% of mice with cancer treated with an IL-6 receptor blocker were alive, compared to only 25% of untreated cancer mice. .

“It’s not just the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier that kills animals,” Bilder said. “Flies can live three or four weeks with a leaky blood-brain barrier, whereas if they have a tumor, they die almost immediately when the barrier is compromised. So we think the tumor is causing something else. Maybe it puts something in circulation that then goes through the broken barrier, although it could also be something that goes the other way, from the brain to the blood.

Bilder has found other carcinogenic chemicals in flies that it’s linked to edema – bloating due to excessive water retention – and excessive blood clotting, which leads to clogged veins. Both conditions frequently accompany cancer. Other researchers found that the fly chemicals produced by the tumors were linked to anorexia – loss of appetite – and immune dysfunction, which are also symptoms of many cancers.

Bilder said the study of cancer in fruit flies offers several advantages over models of cancer in other animals, such as mice and rats. On the one hand, researchers can follow the flies until they die, in order to determine what is really causing the mortality. Ethical concerns prevent researchers from allowing vertebrates to suffer, so research animals are euthanized before they die naturally, preventing a full understanding of the ultimate cause of death. For these animals, the size of the tumor is used as an indicator to assess an animal’s chances of survival.

“We are incredibly excited about the potential to look directly at survival and lifespan,” he said. “We think this is a real blind spot that has not allowed scientists to answer questions about how the tumor kills outside of its local growth. That’s not to say the tumor size is misleading, but fruit flies provide us with a complementary way to examine what cancer is doing. “

And while most rodent cancer studies involve only a few dozen animals, fruit fly experiments can involve several hundred individuals, improving the statistical significance of the results. Fruit flies also reproduce quickly and have a short natural lifespan, which allows for faster studies.

Bilder recognizes that fruit flies and humans are only distantly related, but in the past these flies – Drosophila melanogaster – have played a key role in the understanding of tumor growth factors and oncogenes. Fruit flies could also play a key role in understanding the systemic effects of cancer.

“Not only can flies get tumors that look like human tumors, which we described 20 years ago, but we are now seeing that the host response has remarkable similarities in cachexia, coagulopathies, response immune, cytokine production, all of those things, “he said. noted. “I think (the tumor-host response in fruit flies) is a very rich area. Our hope is to bring attention to the field and attract others to work in it, both from a fly point of view and from a cancer biology and clinician point of view.

Reference: Kim J, Chuang HC, Wolf NK et al. Tumor-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier promotes host death. Development cell. 2021. doi: 10.1016 / j.devcel.2021.08.010

This article was republished from the following materials. Note: The material may have been modified for its length and content. For more information, please contact the cited source.


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Cancer cells’ unexpected genetic tricks to evade the immune system – sciencedaily https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-cells-unexpected-genetic-tricks-to-evade-the-immune-system-sciencedaily/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-cells-unexpected-genetic-tricks-to-evade-the-immune-system-sciencedaily/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 21:45:29 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-cells-unexpected-genetic-tricks-to-evade-the-immune-system-sciencedaily/ Hundreds of cancer-related genes play a different role in causing the disease than scientists expected. It has long been known that tumor suppressor genes block cell growth, preventing cancer cells from spreading. According to scientists, mutations in these genes allow tumors to thrive unchecked. Today, the team of Stephen Elledge, a researcher at Howard Hughes […]]]>

Hundreds of cancer-related genes play a different role in causing the disease than scientists expected.

It has long been known that tumor suppressor genes block cell growth, preventing cancer cells from spreading. According to scientists, mutations in these genes allow tumors to thrive unchecked.

Today, the team of Stephen Elledge, a researcher at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, discovered a surprising new action for many of these defective genes. More than 100 mutated tumor suppressor genes can prevent the immune system from detecting and destroying malignant cells in mice, Elledge, a geneticist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, reports on September 16, 2021 in the journal. Science. “The shock was that these genes are meant to bypass the immune system, instead of just saying ‘grow up, grow up, grow up! “”, he said.

Conventional wisdom had suggested that for the vast majority of tumor suppressor genes, mutations allow cells to break loose, grow and divide uncontrollably. But this explanation was flawed. For example, the mutated versions of many of these genes do not actually cause runaway growth when placed in cells in a petri dish. And scientists couldn’t explain why the immune system, which is normally very good at attacking abnormal cells, doesn’t do more to nip new tumors in the bud.

Elledge’s journal offers some answers. His team investigated the effects of 7,500 genes, including genes known to be involved in human cancer. One-third or more of these cancer-related genes, when mutated, trigger mechanisms that prevent the immune system from rooting out tumors, often in tissue-specific ways.

“These results reveal a fascinating and unexpected relationship between tumor suppressor genes and the immune system,” says Bert Vogelstein, HHMI researcher, cancer geneticist at Johns Hopkins University who was not involved in the research.

Clear melanoma

The idea that tumors can escape the body’s defenses is of course not new. In a major breakthrough in cancer treatment over the past few decades, scientists have found that certain tumors produce proteins that deactivate immune cells known to attack cancer cells. Pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs called checkpoint inhibitors that block these proteins and overactivate the immune system. The first checkpoint inhibitor, based on the Nobel Prize winning work of former HHMI James Allison at the University of California at Berkeley, was approved in 2011. Since then, the drugs have had spectacular success. In a high-profile case in 2015, a checkpoint inhibitor triggered former President Jimmy Carter’s immune system, leaving him to clear out the melanoma that had spread to his brain.

Checkpoint inhibitors are big sellers now. But they’re not the overwhelming, universal therapy some scientists have hoped for. Besides having serious side effects, the drugs only work in a minority of cancer patients and types. Elledge’s work helps explain why: in short, tumors have far more genetic tricks for fighting the immune system than anyone previously thought.

CRISPR engineering

Elledge had a hunch that the faulty tumor suppressor genes were doing something more than speeding up cell growth. From a list of 7,500 genes, his team used CRISPR to design thousands of tumor cells. Everyone was missing a functional version of one of these genes. The researchers placed the cells in two types of mice: those with an immune system and those without. Then the team studied the tumors that developed.

Genetic analyzes revealed which mutated genes were abundant in tumors – and likely played a role in tumor formation. In mice with an immune system, defective tumor suppressor genes have appeared frequently. This shows that these genes – about 30 percent of all tumor suppressor genes tested – work by allowing tumors to evade the immune system, Elledge says.

Elledge’s method revealed the many different genes that tumors can mutate to escape the body’s defenses. To explore possible mechanisms triggered by mutations, the researchers focused on a gene called GNA13. The gene mutation protects cancer cells from the immune system’s T cells, creating a safe space for the tumor to grow, the team found.

Their research paints a sobering picture of a fast and fierce evolving arms race between cancer cells and the immune system, says Elledge, with tumors having hundreds of potential ways to thwart the body’s attack. But he suspects that many of these mutated genes work through similar strategies, a possibility his team can now examine in detail. If this turns out to be the case, an intervention to block one evasion technique could potentially thwart others as well.

Overall, Elledge hopes his findings will open new doors to cancer treatment – by helping to uncover and thwart new and different tumor tricks. “There are a lot of genes that people can now study,” he says.


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EAPM: Flagship event on the crest of a wave in the fight against cancer! https://parentraide-cancer.org/eapm-flagship-event-on-the-crest-of-a-wave-in-the-fight-against-cancer/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/eapm-flagship-event-on-the-crest-of-a-wave-in-the-fight-against-cancer/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 13:30:13 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/eapm-flagship-event-on-the-crest-of-a-wave-in-the-fight-against-cancer/ Good afternoon, healthcare colleagues, and welcome to the update from the European Alliance for Personalized Medicine (EAPM) – the next EAPM event is tomorrow, September 17th! It’s called “The Need for Change: Defining the Healthcare Ecosystem to Determine Value” and it will take place during the ESMO Congress, details below, writes Denis Horgan, executive director […]]]>

Good afternoon, healthcare colleagues, and welcome to the update from the European Alliance for Personalized Medicine (EAPM) – the next EAPM event is tomorrow, September 17th! It’s called “The Need for Change: Defining the Healthcare Ecosystem to Determine Value” and it will take place during the ESMO Congress, details below, writes Denis Horgan, executive director of EAPM.

Cancer screening, cancer policy priorities

EAPM event comes at a good time to move forward in the fight against cancer – Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announced a new initiative to update a 17-year-old Council recommendation on cancer screening. The new 2022 initiatives were proposed in a letter of intent published during the President’s State of the Union address yesterday (September 15).

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In addition, the political party PPE clearly defined its cancer control priorities in a 15-point program. The policy document outlines the proposed changes to the Cancer Committee own-initiative report. This, as well as the reform of the Cross-Border Healthcare Directive – which in theory allows patients from one member country to be treated in another – and data sharing being essential to apply artificial intelligence and Machine learning tools for research, and to enable the digital transformation of healthcare, have been issues at the forefront of recent EAPM work, to address disparities in cancer prevention, the use of data, diagnosis and treatment in Europe.

The event will take place from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm CET tomorrow; here is link to register and here is the link to the agenda.

Parliament adopts two other dossiers for the European Health Union

Two other proposals from the European Health Union will go into trilogue after being adopted in plenary session of Parliament today (16 September). The proposals for regulations on serious cross-border health threats were adopted with 594 votes in favor, 85 against and 16 abstentions. Meanwhile, the change of mandate of the European Center for Disease Prevention and of the Council (ECDC) was adopted with 598 votes in favor, 84 against and 13 abstentions.

The first proposal to increase the mandate of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) is already in trialogue. The second meeting will take place later this month.

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Data governance law

In preparation for a proposal for a new data law expected by December 2021, the European Commission has opened a public consultation.

The main objective of this initiative is to support data sharing within the EU economy, in particular between businesses and between businesses and government, with a horizontal scope (covering e.g. industrial data, the Internet objects, etc.).

It aims to complement other data-related files, such as data governance law, GDPR and ePrivacy regulation, competition law (e.g. horizontal cooperation guidelines) and procurement law. digital. As indicated in politico, this issue will be addressed by the Deputy Ambassadors to Coreper I on 1 October. An EU official familiar with the process said a few countries have requested minor changes to data intermediaries and international data transfers.

Artificial intelligence “at risk”

UN human rights chief calls for a moratorium on the use of artificial intelligence technology which poses a serious risk to human rights, including facial scanning systems which follow people in public spaces. Michelle bachelet, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, also said on Wednesday that countries should expressly ban AI applications that violate international human rights law. Apps that should be banned include government “social rating” systems that judge people based on their behavior and some AI-based tools that classify people into groups such as ethnicity or gender.

AI-based technologies can be a positive force, but they can also “have negative, even catastrophic, effects if used without sufficient consideration of how they affect people’s human rights,” Bachelet said. in a press release.

His comments are accompanied by a new UN report that examines how countries and businesses have rushed to apply AI systems that affect people’s lives and livelihoods without putting in place appropriate safeguards to protect them. prevent discrimination and other prejudices. “It’s not about not having AI” Peggy hicks, the rights office’s thematic engagement director, told reporters as she presented the report in Geneva. “It’s about recognizing that if AI is to be used in these – very critical – areas of human rights function, it has to be done the right way. And we just don’t have a framework in place to ensure that happens yet. “

EU digital targets for 2030

The Commission has proposed a plan to monitor how EU countries are progressing towards the bloc’s digital goals for 2030. The EU will promote its human-centered digital agenda on the global stage and promote alignment or convergence with EU norms and standards. It will also ensure the security and resilience of its digital supply chains and provide comprehensive solutions.

These will be achieved by setting up a toolbox combining regulatory cooperation, capacity and skills building, investment in international cooperation and research partnerships, design of digital economy packages funded by initiatives that bring the EU together and combine EU internal investments and external cooperation instruments investing in improving connectivity with EU partners. The Commission will soon launch a broad process of discussion and consultation, including with citizens, on the EU’s vision and digital principles.

EIB finances vaccines

The board of directors of the European Investment Bank (EIB) has approved 647 million euros to help countries purchase and distribute COVID-19 vaccines and other health projects. The vaccine distribution will benefit Argentina, as well as countries in South Asia such as Bangladesh, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives. At the onset of the crisis, staff at the European Investment Bank began working on both the health emergency and the economic downturn. The Bank has divided its support for biotechnology and medical companies into three main areas: vaccines, therapies and diagnostics. Objective: to hunt down infections, stop the spread of the disease and treat those who fall ill.

Earlier this year, the Bank approved € 5 billion in new funding to support urgent actions in areas such as healthcare and medical innovation for COVID-19. Since then, more than 40 biotechnology or medical companies and projects have been approved for EIB financing amounting to around € 1.2 billion. This has placed the Bank at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19.

The European Investment Bank is also supporting global COVID-19 vaccine distribution programs, particularly in developing countries. For example, the Bank recently approved a € 400 million deal with COVAX, a global initiative supported by hundreds of countries, the private sector and philanthropic organizations to promote equal access to a vaccine.

Good News in Final – Coronavirus Vaccines Reduce Risk of Long Covid, Study Finds

Being fully vaccinated against COVID-19 not only reduces the risk of catching it, but also of an infection turning into a long Covid, suggests research from King’s College London. This shows that in the minority of people who contract Covid after two jabs, the chances of developing symptoms lasting more than four weeks are reduced by 50%. This is compared to people who are not vaccinated.

So far, 78.9% of people over 16 in the UK have received two doses of a Covid vaccine. Many people who contract Covid recover within four weeks, but some have symptoms that persist or develop for weeks and months after the initial infection – sometimes referred to as long-term Covid. It can happen after people have experienced even mild symptoms of coronavirus. The researchers, whose work has been published in Lancet Infectious Diseases, say it is clear that vaccinations save lives and prevent serious illness, but the impact of vaccines on the development of long-lasting illness is less certain.

This is all coming from EAPM for this week – we look forward to tomorrow’s event and will report back next week. Until then, stay safe, and here is the link to register and here is the link to the agenda.


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NACS raises $ 71,000 for the American Cancer Society for the 2020-2021 school year https://parentraide-cancer.org/nacs-raises-71000-for-the-american-cancer-society-for-the-2020-2021-school-year/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/nacs-raises-71000-for-the-american-cancer-society-for-the-2020-2021-school-year/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 19:32:12 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/nacs-raises-71000-for-the-american-cancer-society-for-the-2020-2021-school-year/ Posted: Sep 15, 2021 / 3:32 PM EDT / Update: Sep 15, 2021 / 3:32 PM EDT FORT WAYNE, Indiana (WANE) – On Wednesday, administrators, organizers and students at Northwestern Allen County Schools (NACS) received banners for their participation in the $ 71,000 rain for the American Cancer Society (ACS) during the 2020-2021 school year. […]]]>

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FORT WAYNE, Indiana (WANE) – On Wednesday, administrators, organizers and students at Northwestern Allen County Schools (NACS) received banners for their participation in the $ 71,000 rain for the American Cancer Society (ACS) during the 2020-2021 school year.

The NACS Community Relay For Life event has been recognized at both state and national levels. In Indiana, the event finished in the top three for fundraising events.

National recognition:

  • The 10 schools in the NACS district raised a combined total of $ 55,000, making it the nation’s # 1 event for Schools vs Cancer fundraising.
  • Two of the primary schools finished in the top 10 teams in the country:
    • Perry Hill was second nationally in fundraising with over $ 15,000 raised and Cedar Canyon was seventh with over $ 8,700 raised.
  • Oak View, Arcola and Huntertown were also in the top 10 in early spring and finished among the top 25 fundraising schools in the country.

“It’s an important way to give back to the community, and we understand the number of lives affected by cancer. The involvement of our community has played an important role in increasing awareness and support, ”said Dr. Chris Himsel, Superintendent. “We are grateful to the American Cancer Society for providing educational resources related to cancer prevention that support our teaching of Indiana Academic Standards. By bringing academic standards to life by connecting with our students through physical activity and encouraging healthy habits that actively prevent or reduce their risk of developing cancer in the future, this effort is more meaningful for all. the people involved.

The 2021-2022 NACS Community Relay For Life event is scheduled for May 7, 2022. The event is open to all members of the Fort Wayne community. For more information, visit relay.org or email Ashley Wellman, ACS Senior Director of Development, at Ashley.Wellman@cancer.org.

This year’s event was locally sponsored by FCI Construction, Lawrence Building Group, Meijer, Lengacher Bros Construction, Peppi’s Bar & Grill, New Old Again, Golf BOGO, Brevin’s Restaurant, Premier Communications, Pizza Hut and Berne Workwear. Hallmark Home Mortgage also participated in the event raising over $ 5,000.


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Trippy Bunny NFT Donates 100% Mint Proceeds To Suicide Prevention Foundation https://parentraide-cancer.org/trippy-bunny-nft-donates-100-mint-proceeds-to-suicide-prevention-foundation/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/trippy-bunny-nft-donates-100-mint-proceeds-to-suicide-prevention-foundation/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 14:23:51 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/trippy-bunny-nft-donates-100-mint-proceeds-to-suicide-prevention-foundation/ Trippy Bunny NFT, a new non-fungible token project built on Solana, has announced that it will donate 100% of the proceeds from its mint sale to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The announcement was made on the occasion of Suicide Prevention Day, a global awareness event observed globally on September 10. The annual awareness […]]]>

Trippy Bunny NFT, a new non-fungible token project built on Solana, has announced that it will donate 100% of the proceeds from its mint sale to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

The announcement was made on the occasion of Suicide Prevention Day, a global awareness event observed globally on September 10. The annual awareness day was first organized in 2003 by the International Association for Suicide Prevention. Today, it enjoys the support of the World Health Organization and the World Federation for Mental Health.

Globally, an estimated 700,000 people kill themselves each year, according to United for Global Mental Health, an international mental health promotion foundation. In 2019, it was estimated that more than one in 100 deaths worldwide was caused by suicide.

Trippy Bunny’s mint product was raised in Gemini Dollars (GUSD) and totaled $ 220,886. The entire amount will go to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The project published the hash ID of the transaction, which appeared on Etherscan.

Trippy Bunny hit 1,111 NFT on September 10, and each collectible was valued at 1.11 SOL. At the time of writing, SOL is valued at just under $ 189, according to Cointelegraph Markets Pro.

The transfer of GUSD tokens was facilitated by The Giving Block, a cryptocurrency donation platform that has launched several initiatives to increase charitable contributions from the blockchain industry. The company’s latest initiative, dubbed Crypto Giving Pledge, saw contributions from industry veterans including Ryan Selkis, Dan Matuszewski, Qiao Wang and Haseeb Qureshi.

Related: Cryptocurrency Can Really Make a Difference in Helping People

The cryptocurrency industry has shown its generosity by donating millions of dollars to charities. In May of this year, the Munch and Elongate crypto projects collectively raised over $ 3 million for various nonprofits. Several prominent nonprofits have also started accepting cryptocurrency contributions, including the American Cancer Society, which announced in January that it had established a $ 1 million Cancer Crypto Fund to increase its capacity to accept donations.