Cancer prevention – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 02:29:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer prevention – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Madison man battling cancer educates others about preventative health care https://parentraide-cancer.org/madison-man-battling-cancer-educates-others-about-preventative-health-care/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 02:29:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/madison-man-battling-cancer-educates-others-about-preventative-health-care/ June 30, 2022 9:29 p.m. Job : June 30, 2022 9:29 p.m. Updated: June 30, 2022 9:42 p.m. MADISON, Wis. – Those who know Gary Davis best said he’s always had a community spirit, so watching him use his own health crisis to bolster his commitment to others came as no shock. Davis currently works […]]]>

MADISON, Wis. – Those who know Gary Davis best said he’s always had a community spirit, so watching him use his own health crisis to bolster his commitment to others came as no shock.

Davis currently works as the Youth Employment Coordinator for Briarpatch Youth Services. Prior to that, for nearly 15 years, Davis made it his business to do what he could to help others, work he finds rewarding.

“My dad was always like that,” his daughter and co-worker Kayla Every said. “Going out into the community and doing what you can to counter the negative things.

But as Davis does his part to support others through life’s challenges, he faces a big problem. Three years ago Davis was diagnosed with prostate cancer, the same disease that took his father.

With her father in mind, Davis now uses her community reach to educate black men like her father about the importance of getting tested, listening to their bodies and knowing their risks.

“I think if he would have been in a position to know how far we’ve gone medically, then he probably would have (taken on) that challenge of doing chemo,” he said.

Davis also knows what many health experts do, which is that men often take too long to get to the doctor. He said men need to stop being afraid to see the doctor.

In return, his community is reaching out. Her daughter Every said that since Davis’ diagnosis, people have shown their family support in so many ways, leaving Davis grateful.

“My favorite thing to say to people is, ‘Give people their roses while they can still smell them,'” Davis said. mean to you while they’re here, don’t wait till they’re gone,” you know.”

In addition to his work at Briarpatch, Davis is a member of the African American Cancer Community Advocacy Board and a music promoter. He uses all these platforms to connect with people and inform them of the value of good health practices.

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Expanded potential of the polyamine analog SBP-101 (diethyl dihydroxyhomospermine) as a modulator of polyamine metabolism and cancer therapeutics https://parentraide-cancer.org/expanded-potential-of-the-polyamine-analog-sbp-101-diethyl-dihydroxyhomospermine-as-a-modulator-of-polyamine-metabolism-and-cancer-therapeutics/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/expanded-potential-of-the-polyamine-analog-sbp-101-diethyl-dihydroxyhomospermine-as-a-modulator-of-polyamine-metabolism-and-cancer-therapeutics/ Panbela Therapeutics, Inc. In vitro studies have determined that SBP-101 reducesD cell viability in a wide range of cancer cell types, with an exceptionally strong reduction in ovarian adenocarcinoma viability leading to a 42% increase in median survival in the VDID8+ mouse model of ovarian cancer MINNEAPOLIS, June 28, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Panbela Therapeutics, […]]]>

Panbela Therapeutics, Inc.

  • In vitro studies have determined that SBP-101 reducesD cell viability in a wide range of cancer cell types, with an exceptionally strong reduction in ovarian adenocarcinoma viability leading to a 42% increase in median survival in the VDID8+ mouse model of ovarian cancer

MINNEAPOLIS, June 28, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Panbela Therapeutics, Inc..(Nasdaq: PBLA), a clinical-stage company developing disruptive therapies for the treatment of patients with urgent unmet medical needs, today announced the release of preclinical data from studies of SBP-101 that have demonstrated a 42% increase in median survival in a mouse model of VDID8+ ovarian cancer. Data published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences also showed that SBP-101 delayed tumor progression and decreased overall tumor burden. SBP-101 is a proprietary polyamine analog designed to induce polyamine metabolic inhibition (PMI) by exploiting the compound’s observed high affinity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and other tumors. The company plans to launch a clinical program in ovarian cancer for SBP-101 in 2022.

“These data underscore the importance of polyamines as a therapeutic agent against cancer. These preclinical studies are fundamental to the expansion of our clinical development program. We are looking to extend SBP-101 to ovarian cancer, and later the potential for other cancers. This complements our current clinical development program with the ongoing global randomized trial (ASPIRE) of SBP-101 in first-line metastatic pancreatic cancer, and eflornithine in combination with an anti-PD-1 in pancreatic cancer. non-small cell lung (NSCLC) to begin later this year,” said Jennifer K. Simpson, PhD, MSN, CRNP, President and CEO of Panbela. “We look forward to advancing our development program for SBP-101 and eflornithine in the ovarian cancer clinic and NSCLC indications to help as many patients as possible. »

About our pipeline

The pipeline consists of assets currently in clinical trials with an initial focus on familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), first-line metastatic pancreatic cancer, neoadjuvant pancreatic cancer, colorectal cancer prevention, and colon cancer. ovary. The combined development programs have a steady cadence of catalysts with programs ranging from preclinical studies to registration studies.

SBP-101

SBP-101 is a proprietary polyamine analog designed to induce polyamine metabolic inhibition (PMI) by exploiting the compound’s observed high affinity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and other tumors. The molecule has shown tumor growth inhibition signals in clinical studies of US and Australian patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, demonstrating a median overall survival (OS) of 14.6 months, which is and an objective response rate (ORR) of 48%, both of which exceed what is typically seen with standard treatment of gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel suggesting potential complementary activity with the standard FDA-approved chemotherapy regimen. In data evaluated from clinical studies to date, SBP-101 has not shown exacerbation of bone marrow suppression and peripheral neuropathy, which may be chemotherapy-related adverse events. Serious visual adverse events were assessed and patients with a history of retinopathy or at risk for retinal detachment will be excluded from future SBP-101 studies. The safety data and PMI profile observed in the clinical trial currently sponsored by Panbela support the continued evaluation of SBP-101 in a randomized clinical trial. For more information, please visit https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03412799 .

Flynpovi

Flynpovi is a combination of CPP-1X (eflornithine) and sulindac with a dual mechanism of inhibiting polyamine synthesis and increasing polyamine export and catabolism. In a phase 3 clinical trial in patients with sporadic large bowel polyps, the combination prevented >90% of subsequent precancerous sporadic adenomas compared to placebo. Focusing on FAP patients with lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract anatomy in the recent Phase 3 trial comparing Flynpovi to eflornithine monotherapy and sulindac monotherapy, FAP patients with lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract anatomy lower intestinal (patients with an intact colon, retained rectum, or surgical pouch), Flynpovi showed statistically significant benefit over both single agents (p ≤ 0.02) in delaying surgical events in the lower GI up to four years. The safety profile of Flynpovi did not differ significantly from that of single agents and supports the continued evaluation of Flynpovi for FAP.

RPC-1X

CPP-1X (eflornithine) is in development as a single-agent tablet or high-dose powder packet for several indications, including gastric cancer prevention, neuroblastoma treatment, and diabetes type 1 of recent appearance. Preclinical studies as well as investigator-initiated Phase 1 or Phase 2 trials suggest that the CPP-1X treatment is well tolerated and has potential activity.

About Panbela

Panbela Therapeutics, Inc. is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing disruptive therapies for patients with urgent unmet medical needs. The Company’s main assets are SBP-101 and Flynpovi. Further information can be found at www.panbela.com. The common stock of Panbela Therapeutics, Inc. is listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market LLC under the symbol PBLA.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking statements”, including within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as: “believe”, “design”, “expect to’, ‘feel’, ‘intend’, ‘may’, ‘plan’, ‘intended’ and ‘will’. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that should be considered forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor guarantees of future performance. Instead, they are based solely on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions about the future of our business, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward-looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond our control. Our actual results and financial condition may differ materially and adversely from forward-looking statements. Accordingly, you should not rely on any such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause our actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements include, among others, the following: (i) our ability to obtain additional funds to execute our commercial and clinical development plans; (ii) the progress and success of our clinical development program; (iii) the impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic on our ability to conduct our clinical trials; (iv) our ability to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of our product candidates: SBP-101 and eflornithine (v) our addiction to a third party for performing the registration trial of our Flynpovi product candidate; (vi) our ability to obtain regulatory approvals for our product candidates, SBP-101 and eflornithine in the United States, European Union or other international markets; (vii) market acceptance and level of future sales of our product candidates, SBP-101 and eflornithine; (viii) cost and delays in product development that may result from changes in regulatory oversight applicable to our product candidates, SBP-101 and eflornithine; (ix) the rate of progress in setting up reimbursement agreements with third-party payers; (x) the effect of competing technological and market developments; (xi) costs relating to the filing and prosecution of patent applications and the enforcement or defense of patent claims; and (xii) other factors as discussed in Part I, Item 1A under the heading “Risk Factors” in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, any additional risk disclosed in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and our current report. Reports on Form 8-K. Any forward-looking statements we make in this press release are based on information currently available to us and speak only from the date on which it is made. We undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statement or the reasons why actual results would differ from those anticipated in such forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

Contact information:

Investors:
James Carbonara
R.I. Hayden
(646) 755-7412
james@haydenir.com

Media:
Tammy Green
Panbela Therapeutics, Inc.
(952) 479-1196
IR@panbela.com

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Can your diet really affect your risk of skin cancer? https://parentraide-cancer.org/can-your-diet-really-affect-your-risk-of-skin-cancer/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/can-your-diet-really-affect-your-risk-of-skin-cancer/ NEW YORK – A large study published this month found a surprising link between fish consumption and the development of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. But although the finding raises questions about possible links between diet and melanoma, the study’s lead author and other experts cautioned that this is no reason to […]]]>

NEW YORK – A large study published this month found a surprising link between fish consumption and the development of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. But although the finding raises questions about possible links between diet and melanoma, the study’s lead author and other experts cautioned that this is no reason to avoid eating fish. It also doesn’t change the most important tip for reducing the risk of melanoma: Limit your exposure to UV rays from the sun or tanning booths.

The new study, published in the journal Cancer Causes & Control, assessed data from more than 490,000 adults in the United States aged 50 to 71 who were enrolled in the National Institutes Diet and Health Study. of Health-AARP. At the start of the study, participants completed detailed questionnaires, including information about their fish consumption, and then were followed for about 15 years to track cancer diagnoses within the group. Compared to those who ate virtually no fish, the group that ate the most — an average of 10 ounces, or about three servings, per week — had 22% more cases of malignant melanoma, the researchers found.

It’s unclear why eating fish might affect the risk of developing melanoma, said Dr. Eunyoung Cho, associate professor of dermatology at Brown University and lead author of the study. “We think it’s not fish per se, but probably a contaminant in the fish,” she said. Other studies have shown that people who eat more fish have higher levels of heavy metals such as mercury and arsenic in the body. These same contaminants are also associated with a higher risk of skin cancer, she noted. However, her study did not measure contaminant levels in participants, and more research is needed to explore this link, she said.

“I wouldn’t discourage people from having fish just because of our discovery,” Dr Cho said. Fish consumption is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly even certain other cancers, she said. The American Cancer Society recommends choosing fish, poultry, and beans more often than red meat, and the American Heart Association (AHA) advises eating two servings of fish per week for heart health. (One serving is 3 ounces of cooked fish, according to the AHA, or about three-quarters of a cup of flaked fish.)

Other experts have been equally cautious in their interpretation of the study results. “This does not change dietary recommendations for eating fish as part of a heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory or broad cancer prevention diet,” wrote Dr. Carrie Daniel-MacDougall, associate professor of epidemiology. at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. in an email.

Dr. Daniel-MacDougall conducted an earlier analysis, with shorter follow-up time and fewer variables, of the same NIH-AARP cohort included in the most recent study. His paper, published in 2011, also found a correlation between fish consumption and melanoma risk. However, the NIH-AARP study was originally designed to follow many types of cancers, and it did not measure important and well-known melanoma risk factors, such as a history of sunburn or greater lifetime UV exposure, wrote Dr. Daniel-MacDougall. People with these risk factors may have spent more time in the sun — perhaps at the beach or fishing — and may also have been more likely to enjoy seafood, he said. she declared. Without more information, it is impossible to determine if it is the fish, the time spent in the sun, or another factor that increases the risk of melanoma.

Dr Sancy Leachman, director of the melanoma research program at Oregon Health & Science University, said the new study was well designed and called the results “intriguing”. But, she said, when “you deal with large data sets like this,” you find correlations between factors, not evidence that one causes another. This type of study is good for developing new hypotheses — that contaminants found in fish might increase the risk of melanoma, for example — but they need a lot more research to see if they hold up.

“Science evolves and you can’t do everything overnight. It’s only part of the process,” Dr. Leachman said.

Many studies have identified correlations between certain foods and certain types of cancer, but in general, when more studies are conducted and the results are looked at as a whole, the effects often diminish or completely disappear. For melanoma in particular, limited studies have found strange and surprising correlations with certain foods. Eating more citrus fruits has been associated with a greater risk of melanoma in some studies, but not all, for example; and red and processed meat has been associated with a lower risk of melanoma but a higher risk of other cancers.

When it comes to correlations between cancer risk and specific foods, “don’t get overwhelmed by this incomplete data that has yet to be proven,” Dr. Leachman said. “Stick to the things that work: eat well, sleep well, exercise well, all in moderation,” she said. “It gives you the most resilience possible against any type of disease, including cancer.”

And for melanoma in particular, “the most effective practices we have for preventing melanoma are limiting sun exposure – lifelong, starting in childhood – and screening for skin cancer,” said writes Dr. Daniel-MacDougall.

Compared to the limited data on fish and other dietary factors, there is much more evidence to support this advice, Dr. Leachman said. Having had five or more sunburns doubles your lifetime risk of melanoma, and using an indoor tanning bed can increase your risk by 75%, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

Check your skin regularly for spots that seem new, changing, or unusual, and see a doctor if you find anything concerning, Dr. Leachman said. “If you see something that looks funny, don’t blow it up,” she said. “The sooner you can get it checked out, the better off you’ll be.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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Blood test developed to predict liver cancer risk https://parentraide-cancer.org/blood-test-developed-to-predict-liver-cancer-risk/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:37:08 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/blood-test-developed-to-predict-liver-cancer-risk/ An estimated quarter of adults in the United States have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), excess fat in liver cells that can cause chronic inflammation and liver damage, increasing the risk of liver cancer. Now, UT Southwestern researchers have developed a simple blood test to predict which NAFLD patients are most likely to develop liver […]]]>

An estimated quarter of adults in the United States have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), excess fat in liver cells that can cause chronic inflammation and liver damage, increasing the risk of liver cancer. Now, UT Southwestern researchers have developed a simple blood test to predict which NAFLD patients are most likely to develop liver cancer.

“This test allows us to noninvasively identify who needs to be followed more closely with regular ultrasounds to screen for liver cancer,” said Yujin Hoshida, MD Ph.D., associate professor of internal medicine at the Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases from UTSW, a member of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and senior author of the article published in Science Translational Medicine.

NAFLD is rapidly becoming a leading cause of chronic liver disease in the United States. With rising rates of obesity and diabetes, its incidence is expected to continue to rise. Studies have shown that people with NAFLD have up to seventeen times the risk of liver cancer. For NAFLD patients considered most at risk for cancer, doctors recommend a demanding screening program involving liver ultrasound every six months. But identifying patients who belong to this group is difficult and usually involves invasive biopsies.

Naoto Fujiwara, MD, Ph.D., a research scientist at the Hoshida Laboratory, and his colleagues wondered if blood samples from NAFLD patients could reveal those most at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. In the new study, they analyzed samples from 409 NAFLD patients to reveal a set of 133 genes expressed at above or below average levels in the livers of patients who developed HCC over a 15-year follow-up period. Patients were then stratified into high and low risk groups based on the amount of expression of these genes. More than 15 years after the samples were collected, 22.7% of people in the high-risk group were diagnosed with HCC while no patients in the low-risk group were diagnosed.

“This test was particularly good at telling us who was in this low-risk group,” said Dr. Hoshida, who directs UTSW’s Liver Tumor Translational Research Program. “We can now say with much more confidence that these patients do not need very close follow-up.”

The researchers also converted the liver gene panel into four proteins whose levels could be measured in blood samples to help with risk assessment. When patients were stratified into high- and low-risk groups based on these proteins, 37.6% of patients in the high-risk group were diagnosed with HCC during the 15-year follow-up period, whereas ‘no patients in the low-risk group were diagnosed. diagnostic.

Most of the genes and proteins found to be predictive of HCC risk were immune and inflammatory molecules, highlighting the importance of inflammation in the development of HCC. Additionally, the researchers showed that levels of the molecules changed in conjunction with therapies known to decrease liver inflammation and risk of HCC, including bariatric surgery, cholesterol medications and immunotherapy.

“This means that we could actually use these molecule panels to track the status of patients over time or to inform the potential effectiveness of medical interventions aimed at reducing the risk of liver cancer,” said Dr. Hoshida. . For example, the protein blood test, dubbed PLSec-NAFLD, is already being used to monitor the effectiveness of a cholesterol drug in reducing the risk of liver cancer in an ongoing clinical trial.

Dr. Hoshida’s team plans to continue evaluating the utility of PLSec-NAFLD in larger groups of patients around the world. They also say that in the future, blood tests may be developed to measure cancer risk in other major liver diseases such as hepatitis B and alcoholic liver disease.

Other UTSW researchers who contributed to this study include Naoto Kubota, Bhuvaneswari Koneru, Cesia Marquez, Arun Jajoriya, Gayatri Panda, Tongqi Qian, Shijia Zhu, Xiaochen Wang, Shuang Liang, Zhenyu Zhong, Amit Singal, Jorge Marrero , Indu Raman and Quan. -Zhen Li.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health (R01DK099558, R01CA233794, U01CA226052, U01CA230694 and R01CA222900), the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (RR180016, RR180014 and RP200197), the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLDF 50028), a Uehara Memorial Foundation postdoctoral prize, AMED (JP21fk0210090 and JP21fk0210059), KAKENHI (21H02892), European Commission (ERC-2014-AdG-671231 and ERC-2020-ADG-101021417), and Inserm Plan Cancer and TheraHCC 20 .

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Making the decision to have a double mastectomy at age 20 https://parentraide-cancer.org/making-the-decision-to-have-a-double-mastectomy-at-age-20/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:12:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/making-the-decision-to-have-a-double-mastectomy-at-age-20/ August Miller already decided at age 20 that his surest way to avoid cancer was to have a preventative double mastectomy. TOLEDO, Ohio — For 20-year-old August Miller, breast cancer is a part of life. “It’s just something I was told growing up: breast cancer runs in the family,” Miller said, “Be aware of it, […]]]>

August Miller already decided at age 20 that his surest way to avoid cancer was to have a preventative double mastectomy.

TOLEDO, Ohio — For 20-year-old August Miller, breast cancer is a part of life.

“It’s just something I was told growing up: breast cancer runs in the family,” Miller said, “Be aware of it, expect it, be aggressive.”

Miller’s family is small and sadly, cancer has run through the family a few times before. Her grandmother was diagnosed for the second time when Miller was 4 years old. She said her mother was diagnosed when she was in 6th grade.

Miller was a caregiver for her grandmother and her mother. The reality of cancer was something she faced very regularly. She said his mother was always trying to make fun of him and make him less scary.

“We love that it’s part of our lives. She and I made it fun,” Miller said. “Like, her and I love talking about boobs.”

Having a positive and realistic view of the disease led Miller to discover hard truths early in his life. She said doctors gave her a 33% chance of having breast cancer. At 18, she began to seriously consider following in her mother’s footsteps and undergoing a mastectomy.

Now in her final year of school at Whitmer College, Miller made the decision at just 20 to have a preventative mastectomy.

She said some medical professionals and others tried to talk her out of it. Since the entire medical procedure won’t be free and life after surgery will be different, some fear it’s too extreme.

But Dr. Jessica Burns, surgical breast oncologist at ProMedica, said preventative surgeries are extremely personal choices. Still, the idea of ​​having one at a specific age is not something anyone would enter lightly or at random.

“No, it’s not something extreme to do. These patients have many years ahead of them of the anxiety that surrounds them,” Burns said. “It’s 33%. I’ve definitely seen higher, there’s higher. But it’s quite high, especially when you look at a 21-year-old girl, she has so much life ahead of her.”

Miller lost his grandmother to breast cancer in October 2021. It’s dramatic life events like this that confirm his decision, as a 33% chance of getting cancer is too much to worry about. her head and too much risk for her.

Especially because she will never know when she will have this bad news.

“I could have a newborn and be diagnosed with breast cancer. I could start a new job,” Miller said. “And 33%, versus 10% – 12%, that’s just the average.”

According to the National Cancer Institute, based on current incidence rates, approximately 12% of women born in the United States today will develop breast cancer at some point in their lives.

If this rate stays the same, it means that about 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives.

A mastectomy will lower Miller’s chances to the national average.

“Do what’s best for you and trust your instincts,” she said.

Miller plans to graduate from college for a full semester in early December. Thereafter, she had no plans except to travel with her mother to the Center for Breast Restorative Surgery in New Orleans, to focus on her operation.

“I have no idea what my adult life will be like after I graduate because I think after the surgery I’m going to have to relearn who I am because it’s such a big change,” Miller said.

She anticipates that her medical bills, change of clothes, and life after surgery could cost around $10,000 out of pocket, and that’s with insurance.

If you’d like to donate to help, her GoFundMe with her full story is at this link or you can click below.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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“Researchers are paving the way for new ‘cellular surgery’ in their search for the origins of cancer” – Miriam Stoppard https://parentraide-cancer.org/researchers-are-paving-the-way-for-new-cellular-surgery-in-their-search-for-the-origins-of-cancer-miriam-stoppard/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 15:09:38 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/researchers-are-paving-the-way-for-new-cellular-surgery-in-their-search-for-the-origins-of-cancer-miriam-stoppard/ Honestly, medical research is getting more and more amazing. Researchers at the University of Warwick are paving the way for a new “cell surgery” in their search for the origins of cancer. A bit of context first. When a cell divides, it makes a copy of each chromosome and then shares them equally between the […]]]>

Honestly, medical research is getting more and more amazing.

Researchers at the University of Warwick are paving the way for a new “cell surgery” in their search for the origins of cancer.

A bit of context first. When a cell divides, it makes a copy of each chromosome and then shares them equally between the two new cells.

This process is carried out by a machine in the cell called the mitotic spindle.

But when a cell divides abnormally, it doesn’t share the correct number of chromosomes between the two new cells, and this can be the first step in cancer formation.

New research from Warwick Medical School has discovered how and why this happens, using cell surgery.




This advances our understanding of the origin of cancer and could lead to its prevention.

When something goes wrong at the stage of cell division, the two new cells will be aneuploid, meaning they won’t have the correct number of chromosomes.

This means they will make mistakes when sharing genetic information.

Cancer cells are also aneuploid, so understanding how and why this happens is extremely important in discovering the origin of disease.

Professor Stephen Royle’s research team at Warwick have identified exactly that with their research.




They found that some chromosomes can get trapped and lost in a tangle of membranes around the cell spindle, preventing chromosomes from being shared properly, leading to abnormal cell division that can cause cancer.

They made their discovery by performing a kind of surgery on living cells.

The researchers brilliantly invented a way to remove the tangle of membranes in which the chromosomes are trapped and as a result the chromosomes were saved by the spindle, thus allowing normal and healthy cell division.

This proved, for the first time, that the blockage of chromosomes in these membranes is a direct risk factor for the formation of cancer cells.




Understanding this risk can lead to more effective cancer prevention.

Professor Royle said: “Many scientists working in cell division focus on the spindle – how it works and why it makes mistakes in cancer. In this article we have shifted the spotlight and looked at membranes at the inside dividing cells.

Dr Nuria Ferrandiz, lead author, said: “We discovered that chromosomes can get trapped in membranes and that spells disaster for the dividing cell. It has the potential to transform a normal cell into a cancerous cell. Preventing this can be a way to treat the disease.

This is a major advance in the treatment of cancer.

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Hawaiian and Filipino breast cancer survivors sought for lifestyle research https://parentraide-cancer.org/hawaiian-and-filipino-breast-cancer-survivors-sought-for-lifestyle-research/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 00:05:40 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/hawaiian-and-filipino-breast-cancer-survivors-sought-for-lifestyle-research/ Focus group held in Guam Hawaiian and Filipino breast cancer survivors are wanted to share their strategies that promote a healthy lifestyle. The study, TANICA (Traditional and New Lifestyle Interventions for Breast Cancer Prevention), is conducted by the University of Hawaii at the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources in Mānoa (CTAHR) and the […]]]>
Focus group held in Guam

Hawaiian and Filipino breast cancer survivors are wanted to share their strategies that promote a healthy lifestyle. The study, TANICA (Traditional and New Lifestyle Interventions for Breast Cancer Prevention), is conducted by the University of Hawaii at the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources in Mānoa (CTAHR) and the University of Guam, as U54 Pacific Island Partnership for Cancer Health Equity (PITCH) pre-pilot project.

Directed by uh Mānoa Assistant Professor of Nutrition Monica Esquivelwho serves as an investigator for the Hawaiiof the study, focus groups will be held at CTAHR Urban Garden Center on Tuesday, June 21 (in person), from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday, June 28 (online), from 8 a.m. to noon.

“We know that a healthy lifestyle, which includes sufficient physical activity throughout the day and a diet high in fiber and low in saturated fat, can reduce the recurrence of breast cancer. Yet research studies in this area have taken place outside of Guam and Hawaii and include few or no Asians and Pacific Islanders, so less is known about effective strategies to help our communities adhere to this healthy lifestyle,” said Esquivel, who is also a registered dietitian nutritionist.

The results of this study will help shed light on lifestyle factors that promote breast cancer survival based on current recommendations and the experiences of breast cancer survivors.

For more information about the study, email TANICA@hawaii.edu.

Eligibility criteria

The residents of Hawaii who are breast cancer survivors, at least 18 years of age and of Hawaiian or Filipino ancestry are eligible to participate in this study.

Two focus groups with four to nine women, lasting 60 to 90 minutes, will be organized. Participants will be compensated for their time.

Online pre-registration.

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How quality sleep can help cancer patients and survivors https://parentraide-cancer.org/how-quality-sleep-can-help-cancer-patients-and-survivors/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:55:20 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/how-quality-sleep-can-help-cancer-patients-and-survivors/ Everyone affected by cancer understands the impact it can have on all aspects of life. For cancer patients and survivors, treatment and recovery can be exhausting and painful, while obtaining the deep rest that is essential for recovery is often difficult. “We know that many cancer patients and survivors report sleep disturbances and poor sleep […]]]>

Everyone affected by cancer understands the impact it can have on all aspects of life. For cancer patients and survivors, treatment and recovery can be exhausting and painful, while obtaining the deep rest that is essential for recovery is often difficult.

“We know that many cancer patients and survivors report sleep disturbances and poor sleep quality as a result of their diagnosis or treatment,” said Dr. Alpa Patel, Ph.D., Senior Vice President of population sciences at the American Cancer Society, says Thrive.

There is growing scientific evidence that quality sleep can help improve health and well-being. But the sleep-cancer link has been a neglected area of ​​research, with more attention paid to nutrition and exercise, Dr. Patel says. Although poor sleep quality may be associated with the risk of developing certain types of cancer, evidence to date is limited. There is also limited evidence on how sleep can help patients during treatment and during recovery.

That’s about to change. The American Cancer Society and Sleep Number have launched a six-year partnership to explore the critical link between quality sleep and cancer outcomes.

“We need to know what causes sleep disturbances for different types of cancer,” says Dr. Patel, who oversees researchers and scientists in her role at the American Cancer Society. “By identifying the impact of quality sleep on cancer prevention and cure, we want to identify the best interventions and strategies to potentially improve the quality of life of cancer survivors,” she says. This is essential research, notes Dr. Patel, because there are currently no guidelines on sleep for cancer prevention or for cancer survivors.

Shelly Ibach, President and CEO of Sleep Number, is delighted with this historic partnership, which she says will “directly support our company’s purpose – to improve the health and well-being of society through better sleep. better quality”. The impact, she adds, will be “far reaching, benefiting cancer patients and survivors, and society as a whole”.

Drawing on more than 15 billion hours of highly accurate sleep data generated by Sleep Number 360® smart beds, scientists will study the effects of cancer on the sleep patterns of patients and survivors, analyzing information such as as individuals’ sleep duration and efficiency and key biometric data, including average heart rate and average respiratory rate. They will review information from historic and ongoing cancer prevention studies and explore whether sleep deprivation could be a risk factor for cancer.

“What excites me is that the technology and data generated by Sleep Number smart beds will help fuel and accelerate our science and research,” says Dr Patel.

For Dr. Patel and Ibach, the research has a personal resonance. “Cancer doesn’t just come in, it devastates your life. You live life and then everything changes,” says Ibach, who lost her husband, George, in October 2017 after an 18-month battle with cancer. “My husband was so full of life and brought joy to everyone around him and all of a sudden, boom, he’s diagnosed with leukemia. Next thing, we’re living in hospital for nine months , everything looks good, and then with a moment’s notice, he has hours to live.

Ibach emphasizes the importance of quality sleep for caregivers and those bereaved by the loss of loved ones. “I made sure to take time to sleep whenever I could because obviously your sleep is disrupted when you’re grieving – but sleep is a healer and it has helped me heal mentally, spiritually and physically. “

Cancer is a subject that is also deeply personal for Dr. Patel, who began volunteering with the American Cancer Society as a teenager after his grandfather was diagnosed with brain cancer at the age of 64 years old. “He was riding his bike when his hand went numb,” she said. . “It turned out he had a brain tumour, a glioblastoma the size of a lemon. He went from training for a triathlon to not being able to speak or eat in six months, then he died. Dr. Patel says the experience of losing her beloved grandfather sparked her determination to do whatever she personally could to find a cure for cancer. This led directly to her current career and his goal of supporting cancer patients in terms of prevention, treatment and recovery.

Its goal going forward is to establish clear public health guidelines for sleep and sleep “prescriptions”. “Wouldn’t it be amazing if when a cancer patient or survivor says, ‘I’m having trouble sleeping,’ we can say, ‘Here are precision tools tailored to you, based on your own cancer and your treatment history — here’s what will work best for you?”

These kinds of tailored health guidelines, she points out, are already available for cancer patients when it comes to nutrition and exercise. “If a breast cancer survivor says, ‘I have chronic fatigue,’ we can actually prescribe the right amount of cardio to lessen the side effects of the symptoms. Wouldn’t it be great to have sleep prescriptions as well? »

Dr. Patel’s ultimate goal is to generate enough evidence to spark a movement in the cancer research community around the study of sleep in relation to cancer.

It’s a goal worth pursuing, concludes Ibach. “Cancer doesn’t discriminate — it affects everyone. Our hope is that sleep guidelines will help eradicate this devastating disease and improve millions of lives. I am convinced that we will achieve this. And we are honored to join the American Cancer Society in the fight for a cancer-free world.


Thrive Global and Sleep Number believe that quality sleep has a profound impact on health and well-being. Today, this is more important than ever as we seek quality sleep to help boost immunity, increase energy and improve recovery. Visit sleepnumber.com to find the best sleep solution for you, so you can wake up to your greatest purpose.

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Toby Keith announces he has stomach cancer at 60 https://parentraide-cancer.org/toby-keith-announces-he-has-stomach-cancer-at-60/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:14:49 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/toby-keith-announces-he-has-stomach-cancer-at-60/ Country singer Toby Keith has revealed he has stomach cancer. The 60-year-old has been undergoing treatment since his diagnosis last fall. “So far so good. I need time to breathe, recover and relax,” he said in a statement. On Sunday, Toby Keith revealed to fans that he had stomach cancer. The country music star shared […]]]>
  • Country singer Toby Keith has revealed he has stomach cancer.
  • The 60-year-old has been undergoing treatment since his diagnosis last fall.
  • “So far so good. I need time to breathe, recover and relax,” he said in a statement.

    On Sunday, Toby Keith revealed to fans that he had stomach cancer. The country music star shared the news via Instagram, writing that he was diagnosed last fall.

    “I’ve spent the last six months receiving chemo, radiation and surgery,” the 60-year-old ‘Red Solo Cup’ singer revealed. “So far so good. I need time to breathe, recover and relax.

    He continued, “I’m looking forward to spending this time with my family. But I’ll see the fans sooner rather than later. I can’t wait.

    The musician is currently on tour, with shows scheduled in Illinois and Michigan on June 17 and 18. As of press time, there has been no official announcement as to whether or not the performances will still take place.

    This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

    Fans and followers expressed their love and best wishes to the musician, who released his first album in five years, Peso in my pocket, Last year. “Praying for you and thinking of your brother,” one person commented. “Lots of love your way Toby 👍❤,” added another. “Praying for you!! I’m going through cancer treatments too!!! We can do this, Toby!!!” someone else wrote.

    According to the American Cancer Society, the average age of people diagnosed with stomach cancer is 65, and it affects men more often. According to the society, around six in 10 people aged 65 and over are diagnosed with the disease each year, but overall cases have declined over the past 10 years.

    The most common type of stomach cancer is adenocarcinoma, an overgrowth of cells often treated with targeted drug therapy. Less common types are gastrointestinal stromal tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, and lymphomas, which may require more vigorous treatment.

    This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

    Prior to his diagnosis, Keith spent years advocating for cancer patients, especially children, through the Toby Keith Foundation, which he founded in 2006. The nonprofit organization’s mission is “to encourage the health and happiness of pediatric cancer patients and to support OK Kids Korral,” which is a “free, convenient, and comfortable home for pediatric cancer patients receiving treatment” in the state Originally from Keith, Oklahoma.

    “There is no greater gift than keeping families strong and united during a difficult time,” reads the foundation’s website. “If we can relieve the stress of a family, encourage a sibling and comfort a sick child, then we will make a difference in the fight against cancer.

    Our thoughts are with Keith and his family at this time.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content on piano.io

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After a mastectomy, some women don’t want to replace their breasts https://parentraide-cancer.org/after-a-mastectomy-some-women-dont-want-to-replace-their-breasts/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 14:11:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/after-a-mastectomy-some-women-dont-want-to-replace-their-breasts/ Several of those who have requested the procedure say they were rebuffed – and outright refused – by their doctors when told about it June 11, 2022 at 7:11 a.m. EDT (Jimena Estíbaliz for The Washington Post) During her training as a breast surgeon, Deanna Attai, an associate professor at UCLA’s David Geffen School of […]]]>

Several of those who have requested the procedure say they were rebuffed – and outright refused – by their doctors when told about it

(Jimena Estíbaliz for The Washington Post)

During her training as a breast surgeon, Deanna Attai, an associate professor at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine, read studies and heard from mentors that women who opted against breast reconstruction after mastectomy had generally a lower quality of life.

But Attai found it didn’t match what she’d seen online over the past few years: Facebook groups with names like “No Shirts” and “Flat and Fabulous” that included several hundred happy stories from women — and photos — about their choice to have “aesthetic flat closure,” the term used by the National Cancer Institute as of 2020, and forego breast reconstruction.

Attai therefore did its own survey of nearly 1,000 women who had undergone single or double mastectomy without reconstruction. Published last year in Annals of Surgical Oncology, it found nearly three-quarters of women said they were satisfied with the outcome.

No government or organization tracks the number of apartment closures each year. According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, nearly 277,000 cases of invasive breast cancer occurred in 2020 in the United States. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported that about 140,000 mastectomies were performed that year, about half of which involved additional reconstructive surgery.

The flat closure has always been an option, but Anne Marie Champagne, a Yale doctoral student whose research focuses on this issue, says there has been a shift in attitude towards flat closures in conversations online from 2012. Champagne, 53, who opted for flat closure after a mastectomy in 2009, says that before 2012, there were only two posts about flat closure on the Breastcancer.org message board . “That year, I saw a message from the founder of the advocacy group Flat Closure NOW! that read, I want to see you. I want to form a union. I wish it was okay to be flat… if it’s your choice, I hope women who see me, as flat as possible, will see that the reconstruction is not normal.

What struck Champagne was not just the content of the message, but the number of people who read it. “At most, Breastancer.org posts have been viewed a few thousand times,” Champagne says. “[That] post had 79,000 views and 3,500 comments within six months of posting.

My double mastectomy made me reevaluate: what do my breasts mean to me?

While many women still opt for breast reconstruction, as figures from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons clearly show, Champagne and others committed to the issue of flat closure tick off a list of reasons, including a increased awareness of the option, for what cancer doctors and surgeons say there is growing interest in going flat.

“I’ve definitely seen more patients ask to be flat after a mastectomy, probably because they feel more empowered to make that decision,” says Roshni Rao, chief of breast surgery at Columbia University Medical Center in New York. .

“A diagnosis of breast cancer can be especially overwhelming because there are so many decisions to make in a short time, including choosing doctors, a treatment plan, and a woman’s post-mastectomy breast,” says Attai, in an email. There is more awareness now that the reconstruction process carries risks. “Women who opt for reconstruction, whether it’s a breast implant or their own tissue (called autologous reconstruction) could face multiple surgeries, post-operative recovery, risk of 10% infection that can interfere with a chemotherapy or radiotherapy program, and occasionally recalls and implant removals.”

For women who want to do reconstruction, Attai says, they often think the effort and the risk are worth it. “But for others, it’s not.”

It wasn’t for Pepper Segal of North Carolina, who was diagnosed with breast cancer three years ago while pregnant at age 31. She was delivered at 36 weeks and started chemotherapy two weeks later. But soon after, she felt pain in her armpit which turned out to be the spread of cancer. Segal underwent an emergency mastectomy and decided to remove both breasts – and have a flat closure.

“I was told that if I wanted to have reconstruction I would have to wait two years because my form of cancer has a high recurrence rate and detection can be more difficult with implants or autologous reconstruction,” she says. . “But I opted for the flat closure. I didn’t want to subject my body to anything else.

Segal says she “thank God for Billie Eilish” and her signature baggy clothes. “I can dress in loose clothes, and it looks cool now.”

Expectations have changed

Sagit Meshulam-Derazon, a plastic surgeon at Rabin Medical Center in Tel Aviv who specializes in breast reconstruction, says she and her medical partner, who is also a plastic surgeon, recently discussed the choice they would each make if they received a breast cancer diagnosis. The two agreed that they would opt for a flat closure, noting that expectations for how a woman should look had changed a lot.

“Look at Andie MacDowell, the actress, who now plays roles without coloring her gray hair,” Meshulam-Derazon says. “What women look like these days is more often what they choose to look like, rather than an idealized image.”

Transgender woman challenges Chicago definition of female breast

Champagne also says she thinks online photos of post-mastectomy flat chests of transitioning transgender men played a role.

“I had several friends who transitioned in the years leading up to my diagnosis and surgery, and saw what their flat chests looked like, which made me feel like I had more options. “, she says. “Socieally, we have become more open to a wider range of bodily expressions.”

However, the women in Attai’s survey, as well as posts on the social media pages of apartment closure advocacy groups, find that some women are rebuffed and outright denied by their doctors when they bring up the idea of ​​closing apartments or say that is what they want. They want.

Some 22% of women who responded to Attai said that a flat closure option was not initially offered by their surgeon, or was not supported by the surgeon, or that the surgeon intentionally left out the extra skin in case the patient changes her mind. This extra skin would require further surgery if the woman did not change her mind about flat closure.

“I did you a favor,” was what Champagne’s doctor told him when he entered his hospital room after the mastectomy to explain that he had left extra skin for reconstruction.

“Even though I went into surgery thinking we agreed on closure,” Champagne says. “I had clearly expressed my wishes. To this, he replied that, in his experience, all breast cancer survivors recover in six months. When I heard his words, I felt deep grief, a combination of grief and anger. I couldn’t believe my surgeon would make a decision for me while I was under anesthesia that would go against everything we had discussed – what I had consented to.

She is not currently considering revision surgery to remove excess skin.

Kim Bowles, 41, of Pittsburgh, says her surgeon’s decision to ignore her stated decision to have a flat closure is what galvanized her to start the advocacy group Not Putting on a Shirt. “When the anesthesia started to kick in, I heard the surgeon say he was going to leave some skin in case I changed my mind, and it was too late for me to protest. I woke up with a look that I didn’t want,” she said.

Now, the organization’s website includes a list of plastic surgeons who perform aesthetic flat closures and provides talking points for patients to help them discuss the procedure with their doctors. Bowles underwent revision surgery three years after his initial operation.

Not an option for everyone

Not everyone can or wants to have a flat closure. Kelsey Larson, chief of breast surgery at the University of Kansas Health System, says it’s important for patients to consider first and foremost how any surgical choice may affect their cancer treatment and outcomes. cancer.

“It’s very important for patients to remember that they are having a mastectomy for medical purposes, as part of the prevention or treatment of cancer,” she says. Larson says she would “encourage any patient receiving cancer care to ask questions” specifically about these issues.

Years ago when my twin had breast cancer I took drastic action and I’m grateful I did.

Elizabeth Mittendorf, chair of surgical oncology at Harvard’s Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Susan G. Komen Foundation fellow, says heavier patients especially need to talk to a plastic surgeon, rather than to a general surgeon, before opting for a flat closure procedure, and be prepared that the look may not be what you hoped for.

Excess fabric in women who carry more weight often means it’s not possible to achieve a sleek, flat look, says Mittendorf. And it may take more than one surgery to allow parts of the woman’s body to heal before completing the procedure.

Larson says that while she welcomes the increased focus on flat closure so women can choose the option they want, she is concerned that women who want breast reconstruction after mastectomy now feel hesitant.

“In recent years, patients have whispered to me that they want reconstruction,” she says, “they fear they will be misjudged for choosing breasts.”

In a sign of the growing interest in flat closure, sessions on how to communicate about it with patients are springing up at medical meetings about breast cancer. Attai and defenders such as Bowles have been asked to give presentations.

That’s important, says Scott Kurtzman, chief of surgery at Waterbury Hospital in Connecticut and president of the National Breast Center Accreditation Program (NAPBC), a program of the American College of Surgeons.

“I’m sure there are a lot of surgeons out there who have their own idea of ​​what female aesthetics should be, and they struggle to release it and accommodate people who don’t share the same point of view. view,” Kurtzman says.

NAPBC is now asking breast centers to report to the board of directors on how they share decision-making on post-mastectomy choices and to demonstrate that they accept patient requests for aesthetics that a patient chooses.

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