Cancer Specialist – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 05:42:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer Specialist – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Experienced Specialist Kerry Gillespie Promoted to Associate Solicitor as Hudgells Solicitors Serious Injury Team Continues to Grow https://parentraide-cancer.org/experienced-specialist-kerry-gillespie-promoted-to-associate-solicitor-as-hudgells-solicitors-serious-injury-team-continues-to-grow/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 12:33:45 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/experienced-specialist-kerry-gillespie-promoted-to-associate-solicitor-as-hudgells-solicitors-serious-injury-team-continues-to-grow/ Kerry Gillespie, Hudgell Solicitors Experienced serious injury lawyer Kerry Gillespie has been credited with establishing her position as an “integral figure” at Hudgell Lawyers by being promoted to Associate Solicitor. Since joining in 2021, Ms Gillespie, who works from the firm’s Manchester office, has developed her own impressive caseload of serious injury claims, many with […]]]>

Kerry Gillespie, Hudgell Solicitors

Experienced serious injury lawyer Kerry Gillespie has been credited with establishing her position as an “integral figure” at Hudgell Lawyers by being promoted to Associate Solicitor.

Since joining in 2021, Ms Gillespie, who works from the firm’s Manchester office, has developed her own impressive caseload of serious injury claims, many with potential settlement values ​​in damages in the seven figures.

Providing a support role to Serious Injury Managers Sarah Patten in Manchester and Samuel McFadyen in Hull, she also helped reshape a growing department while playing a leading role in representing and supporting a group of more than 150 injured survivors of the Manchester Arena bombing in 2017.

Ms. Gillespie has also played a pivotal role in establishing and implementing a dedicated commitment to critically injured clients, which ranges from providing immediate and extensive support to clients and their families from the outset from a complaint, to the guarantee of longer-term vital assistance. provided well after the legal matters are over.

She also took the lead in Hudgells’ work in supporting those injured in military service, either through negligence claims against the Department of Defense or through the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme run by the government.

More recently, the department launched support for former British servicemen seeking compensation from the US government in relation to serious illnesses, including cancers, caused while at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina between the 1950s and 1980s. , when people were exposed to contaminated water supplies.

Lists of partners provide a “clear path” to managerial responsibility

Me Gillespie, a lawyer since 2008 and specializing in claims for spinal cord injuries and amputations, becomes the 12e member of Hudgell’s legal team to be promoted to partner since the roles were first introduced in January last year.

Since then, five of the original eight partners, including Mr. McFadyen, have been promoted to management positions.

Current partners alongside Ms Gillespie include clinical negligence specialists Caroline Murgatroyd, Michelle Tebbutt, Helena Wood, Hayley Collinson, Lauren Dale and Elizabeth Maliakal, and travel lawyer Tracy Stansfield.

Rachel Di Clemente, Managing Director of Huddell Solicitors, said: “I am delighted to confirm Kerry’s appointment as Associate Solicitor. This reflects the significant impact she has had since joining the firm last year. She has become an integral part of the legal teams supporting major corporate files and is also heavily involved in business development.

“We established Associate roles to reward high performing staff who not only are committed to doing great work for our customers, but also demonstrate dedication and passion every day to help the business grow and grow. to grow

“It is a testament to the success of the roles that since their inception in January 2021, five of the original eight groups have been promoted to leadership positions, and we have made four additional associate appointments.”

The serious injury squad has been reshaped with managers for Manchester and Hull

The Hudgells serious injury team was reshaped this year following the decision of former personal injury manager Jane Woodcock to step back from her day-to-day leadership role after 23 years with the team. ‘company. She now supports on a consulting, part-time basis.

Mr McFadyen, an APIL Accredited Senior Advocate, has been promoted from Partner to Serious Injury Manager in Hull, and Ms Patten has been appointed Serious Injury Manager in Manchester.

Solicitor Sarah Kidd, who was also part of the first group of associates, has also been promoted to personal injury manager, overseeing cases that will fall under future fixed fee limits, with values ​​up to £100,000.

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A sleep specialist gives advice on how to sleep better and avoid SAD https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-sleep-specialist-gives-advice-on-how-to-sleep-better-and-avoid-sad/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 13:27:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/a-sleep-specialist-gives-advice-on-how-to-sleep-better-and-avoid-sad/ November 17—If you have trouble getting out of bed in the morning, feeling depressed, and low on energy, you’re not alone. Dr. Preetha Rosen is a sleep specialist at Gritman Medical Center in Moscow. She said that in winter, a lack of exposure to daylight can significantly affect the body’s circadian system, which she describes […]]]>

November 17—If you have trouble getting out of bed in the morning, feeling depressed, and low on energy, you’re not alone.

Dr. Preetha Rosen is a sleep specialist at Gritman Medical Center in Moscow. She said that in winter, a lack of exposure to daylight can significantly affect the body’s circadian system, which she describes as its “master clock”.

“The clock is so powerful that it influences our sleep-wake rhythm, it also influences our energy level, our metabolism, our hormonal regulation,” she said.

When that rhythm is misaligned, Rosen said, it can have a profound negative effect on multiple parts of the body, including increased inflammation, obesity, blood sugar, diabetes, and even cancer risk.

People who have severe symptoms that affect their daily functioning are often diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. Symptoms include depression, fatigue, difficulty concentrating and trouble sleeping. The disorder is more common in women and in northern latitudes.

For other people, seasonal changes might not result in a diagnosable disorder. But they can still lead to many of the same symptoms on a lower level.

“Light isn’t just about sleep and wakefulness. Light is also important for vitamin D. Light has a big effect on mood,” Rosen said.

People should also make sure to eat foods rich in vitamin D, including oily fish and other fortified foods, and some may want to consider a supplement during the winter months, especially if they are often in indoors during the sunny part of the day. A blood test can determine vitamin D levels, which patients can discuss with their GP.

Typically, Rosen said, diagnosed SAD is managed by a primary care provider or psychiatrist. But for people with SAD and the winter blues, light therapy and prioritizing daylight exposure are important. Rosen recommends taking breaks for winter walks and light therapy, like dawn simulator lamps that slowly brighten a room in the morning.

Sleep and psychiatry are closely linked, Rosen said — one of the most common reasons she sees patients year-round is insomnia. In these cases, many patients say they find it difficult to calm their minds and are often dependent on medication.

“The question I ask my patients is, ‘OK, you’re on a drug: how long do you plan to take it?’ You can’t take these drugs for the rest of your life,” Rosen said.

Rosen uses tools like cognitive behavioral therapy and sleep diaries with patients to help them form better habits and a better relationship with sleep.

She also recommends patients work to keep a consistent bedtime and wake-up time — that means even if it’s the weekend, you probably shouldn’t sleep more than about 30 minutes.

The right schedule differs from person to person, so some people might be better off going to bed earlier than others. But the inconsistency disrupts the circadian rhythm, which can create problems including inflammation, poor cognitive function and a weakened immune system.

“Sleep lays hands on too many physiological processes for us to ignore,” Rosen said.

This advice comes with a catch. If you toss and turn, Rosen says, don’t stay in bed.

“The longer you stay in bed, the more you train your brain that it’s okay to be in bed tossing and turning because the bed should only be for sleeping, right? ” Rosen said. “So it’s almost like… some of my patients almost expect not to fall asleep. That in itself feeds into their anxiety about sleep.”

Sun can be reached at rsun@lmtribune.com or on Twitter at @Rachel_M_Sun. This report is made possible by the Lewis-Clark Valley Healthcare Foundation in partnership with Northwest Public Broadcasting, the Lewiston Tribune and the Moscow-Pullman Daily News.

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Lowcountry cancer specialist wins lifetime achievement award https://parentraide-cancer.org/lowcountry-cancer-specialist-wins-lifetime-achievement-award/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 00:19:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/lowcountry-cancer-specialist-wins-lifetime-achievement-award/ CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – An oncology dentist at Trident Medical Center has received national recognition for her work helping cancer patients. Dr. Betsy Davis received a National Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics. Davis is one of a small group of subspecialists in the United States who use 3D printing and […]]]>

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – An oncology dentist at Trident Medical Center has received national recognition for her work helping cancer patients.

Dr. Betsy Davis received a National Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Maxillofacial Prosthetics.

Davis is one of a small group of subspecialists in the United States who use 3D printing and other technologies to create prosthetic eyes, ears, noses and other parts of the head and neck surgery to replace patients lost to cancer, Trident spokesman Rod Whiting said.

“I think head and neck cancer is the most devastating cancer because it can’t be hidden,” Davis said. “We live in a world where we are often judged on our appearance. My colleagues and I work to make a difference in how our patients look, eat and swallow. I believe our work is about function, quality of life and restoration for the whole patient. I like what I do.”

The organization presented Davis with the Andrew J. Ackerman Memorial Award, its highest honor, over the weekend at the inaugural Head and Neck Oncology Symposium at the Wild Dunes Resort on the Isle of Palms. .

“Maxillofacial prostheses are so rewarding for patients who lose part of the cranial facial region to cancer – their head and neck; or their oral cavity; or missing an eye, nose or ear – so they can be rehabilitated with a custom prosthesis, said Dr. Mark S. Chambers, section chief of oral oncology and maxillofacial prosthodontics in the department of surgery at head and neck.

He said the result of work like Davis gives patients the dignity they need and deserve.

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What is the new CMMI strategy for specialized APMs? https://parentraide-cancer.org/what-is-the-new-cmmi-strategy-for-specialized-apms/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 17:23:01 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/what-is-the-new-cmmi-strategy-for-specialized-apms/ During a fireside chat at this week’s Health Care Learning and Action Network Summit Meeting, Sarah Fogler, Ph.D., MA, of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation, spoke about the decade of CMMI’s experience in creating alternative payment models for specialty care, and also spoke about upcoming opportunities in this space. Fogler is acting director […]]]>

During a fireside chat at this week’s Health Care Learning and Action Network Summit Meeting, Sarah Fogler, Ph.D., MA, of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation, spoke about the decade of CMMI’s experience in creating alternative payment models for specialty care, and also spoke about upcoming opportunities in this space.

Fogler is acting director of the Patient Care Models Group, which develops and implements episode-based payment initiatives, including the Bundled Payments for Care initiative – Advanced Model, Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model, Oncology Care Model, Enhancing Oncology Model, Home Independence and Intravenous Immunoglobulin Demonstration. Prior to joining the CMS Innovation Center, she served as Senior Director of Population Health and Community Benefits at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Baltimore.

She was interviewed by Amol Navathe, MD, Ph.D., a tenured faculty member in health policy and medicine and a senior researcher at the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Vice Chairman and Commissioner of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), a nonpartisan agency that advises the US Congress on Medicare policy.

Fogler noted that the CMS Innovation Center has established a comprehensive strategy to integrate specialists into value-based payment programs aligned with the CMS Innovation Center strategy update.

“Over the past decade, we have built and continue to refine a solid foundation of accountability across a number of key specialties and conditions. We did this alongside but separately from our model tests of advanced primary care and accountable care organizations,” she said. “While the strategic refresh focuses on improving specialty care, we expect these accountability structures to coordinate with or more fully integrate specialty care to provide comprehensive care for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries.”

To date, she explained, specialist care models have focused on inpatient medical and surgical admissions and procedures in hospital outpatient departments. There are episode-based payment models, including bundled payments for care improvement initiative models and a comprehensive care model for joint replacement. “These models have driven transformational changes in the delivery of care across transitions, including between post-acute care hospitals and community supports,” she said.

Fogler added that in addition to episode-based payment models, the CMMI has made gains through specialized models that focus on conditions – particularly for oncology and kidney disease, including the model of Oncology Care and the New Enhanced Oncology Care Model and Renal Care Choices and the Comprehensive Model ESRD Program. “There remain opportunities for fragmentation between primary care providers and specialists, improving access to high quality specialist services and involving more specialists in value-based payment in general. So that’s where we’re focusing on the key areas of our specialty strategy moving forward.

Navathe asked Fogler to go into detail about the primary care/specialist interface because, he said, “many of us who work in space, who study that space, who try to ‘to be innovators, have a hard time with it’.

“We have four explicit and discrete areas of focus in our specialty care strategy, and this extends in a very focused way across the continuum of care for recipients,” Fogler responded. “The first area of ​​focus of the specialty strategy relates to data sharing to improve transparency. and clinician performance. This isn’t a new area for the agency, of course, but we’re focused on doing a better job of arming our data provider partners to make informed decisions about who they want to engage with. as specialist care partners.

She said the second area of ​​focus is to continue CMMI’s history of testing large-scale episode-based payment models that deliberately align with ACOs and primary care, and that would include mandatory models in the future.

The third component of the specialty care strategy is to help specialists become more integrated into primary care-oriented models. “We haven’t explicitly tested a primary care model, although we’ve done a ton of work in the primary care space, really layering this specialist care partnership within the base of the primary care model that we tested at the innovation center,” she says, “so we’re excited to do even more work there.”

The fourth element of the specialty care strategy is to create incentives within population-based models to encourage the integration of specialty care. That doesn’t necessarily mean new models, Fogler said. “It could be tools and different programmatic waivers or other similar things that we could introduce into our population-based portfolio that could encourage the integration of specialist care.”

Navathe asked Fogler for more details on creating incentives for integrating specialists into models primarily designed for primary care or populations. “I could imagine this, for example, as co-located endocrinology for diabetic patients. Are these incentives for this kind of structural change in the delivery model? Or is it more around results? Try to explore this interface between PCP and specialists?

“I will say that the fourth part of the strategy is the one that we have identified as longer term,” Fogler replied. Lessons learned in the short term will inform this fourth installment, she said, adding that they were considering a few different levers. One involves modifying beneficiary alignment algorithms to go beyond traditional E/M outpatient services and to include more inpatient services. “For example, we are also considering developing subpopulation targets for high volume or high cost conditions that can be reintroduced through the formality of model design or through the informality of arming tools and supports, e.g. example, ACOs with additional information about what their terms cost within their network and for their assigned beneficiaries,” she said.

Fogler noted that the CMMI realizes that the calculations of an ACO are different for integrated delivery systems and hospital-led ACOs versus physician-led ACOs. “That has been a distinguishing feature of this fourth component of the specialty strategy which is to think hard about how the levers need to be different for hospital-led versus physician-led ACOs,” a- she declared. “A key piece of this puzzle that we have begun to unpack is that hospitals cannot always justify a decrease in referral volume if an ACO shared savings rate does not sufficiently cover lost revenue, so it makes sense that ACO savings to date have been concentrated among physician-led ACOs.

Meanwhile, she added, the fastest vertical integration has occurred among specialty practices compared to primary care, namely in oncology and cardiology, meaning that these specialty practices increasingly belong in addition to hospitals and are less likely to join PCP ACOs. “We know we need tailored approaches and incentives for these different types of model participants with different economic and market-based incentive structures,” Fogler said. “Our plan is to work over the next few years as we develop strategies to support the first three elements of the specialty strategy to really inform the future design of this population-based integrated fourth specialty strategy.”

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Cancer specialist Dr Siddhartha Mukherjee talks about his battle with depression https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-specialist-dr-siddhartha-mukherjee-talks-about-his-battle-with-depression/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 18:48:16 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-specialist-dr-siddhartha-mukherjee-talks-about-his-battle-with-depression/ “I had been working tirelessly, I think, for 27 years, since college. Working tirelessly”, – Dr Siddhartha MukherjeeDr. Siddhartha Mukherjee – Image credit: Getty ImagesBy: Kimberly Rodrigues According to the American Psychiatric Association, depression is described as a common and serious medical illness that negatively influences the way you think, feel, and act. The death […]]]>

“I had been working tirelessly, I think, for 27 years, since college. Working tirelessly”, – Dr Siddhartha Mukherjee

Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee – Image credit: Getty Images

By: Kimberly Rodrigues

According to the American Psychiatric Association, depression is described as a common and serious medical illness that negatively influences the way you think, feel, and act.

The death of a loved one, the end of a relationship or the loss of a job are all difficult experiences for a person.

Therefore, according to experts, it is normal for feelings of grief or sadness to develop in response to such circumstances, just like in the case of Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, one of the world’s most admired doctors and the one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential Physicians.

The highly intelligent cancer specialist who has helped cure cancer and spent his life doing groundbreaking research was hit by a wave of depression five years ago, the Times reports.

Although the doctor’s father passed away and he is grieving, according to Dr Mukherjee, depression had plagued him for years and was more than just an expected response to the loss of a parent.

Speaking of his experience, he reportedly said he was “swamped by the deepest wave of depression I have ever experienced. My father had passed away and I could feel the crunch of age – mentally and physically. But frankly, some of them were mysterious.

The depression is said to have persisted and the doctor believes this is likely due to the way he continually pushed himself. He is quoted as saying, “I had been working tirelessly, I think, for 27 years, since college. Work tirelessly.

Thinking about it a little more, he adds: “It was a bit like the frog in the soup. I didn’t have a clue what state I was in until the water was really boiling. The water was boiling and I suddenly realized that I had lost interest in so many things.

Dr. Mukherjee is based at Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York, and four teams of scientists are working on his ideas.

As mentioned earlier, the oncologist constantly pushes the limits and tries to solve several puzzles a day with the aim of cracking several codes at once. The race is against the clock as his patients die and many people depend on him.

He is known to dig his brain for several hours a day, day after day, looking for new angles to attack cancer. As a cancer doctor, he also continuously records the stories of dying people. So you can imagine the stress he is under and he is trying to fight.

The oncologist has studied the entire history of medical science and recalls it in full – Aristotle, Vesalius, Harvey, Galen Hooke, Snow, Lister, etc., down to gene splicing or some form of genetic engineering, including he is a leading lawyer.

The doctor also had a hugely successful second career as an author. In fact, his cancer book, The Emperor of All Diseases, won the Pulitzer Prize. Additionally, his next book The Gene: An Intimate History won the Phi Beta Kappa Book Prize in Science.

Additionally, Dr. Mukherjee is said to have always been an outgoing and outgoing person who enjoyed talking and exchanging ideas with all kinds of people. He also enjoyed collecting art and talking to artists.

But unfortunately, due to her depression, her world had turned gray and dark.

Speaking of the same, he says, “Things that used to bring me joy didn’t bring me joy. I haven’t found the same joy in reading a book or making a discovery. Or simple joys, like the company of a friend.

Moreover, in his latest book The Song of the Cell, Dr. Mukherjee writes that he felt “drowned in a tide of sadness”.

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What is a specialist in hematology, what does he do, how to become? https://parentraide-cancer.org/what-is-a-specialist-in-hematology-what-does-he-do-how-to-become/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 22:12:49 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/what-is-a-specialist-in-hematology-what-does-he-do-how-to-become/ What is a hematology specialist, what does he do, how to become Physicians who diagnose, treat, and monitor blood-related diseases are defined as hematology specialists. The hematology specialist performs the examination and treatment of patients using the correct tools, equipment and equipment. What does a hematology specialist do? What are their duties and responsibilities? The […]]]>
What is a hematology specialist, what does he do, how to become

Physicians who diagnose, treat, and monitor blood-related diseases are defined as hematology specialists. The hematology specialist performs the examination and treatment of patients using the correct tools, equipment and equipment.

What does a hematology specialist do? What are their duties and responsibilities?

The hematology specialist is responsible for various tasks to ensure worker health, occupational safety, environmental protection regulations, professional efficiency and quality requirements. Some of the tasks that need to be done can be listed as follows;

  • Perform the physical examination of the patient,
  • Take detailed information about the patient’s complaints and record them in the patient registration form,
  • To request a diagnostic blood count, biochemistry, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, review of folic acid levels, cultures, radiological and special diagnostic tests,
  • Diagnose disease by evaluating examination findings and examination findings,
  • To carry out the treatment of the patient,
  • Inform the patient and his relatives about the disease, its treatment, the risks and the means of prevention,
  • Assume responsibility for the training and supervision of paramedics,
  • Ensure the transfer of blood and blood products to the right patients under appropriate conditions.

Requirements to Become a Hematology Specialist

Hematology is a scientific branch organized in the departments of internal medicine and pediatrics of universities. After specializing in internal medicine and paediatrics, the title of specialist in hematology can be obtained with a second training course lasting 3 years.

What education is required to become a hematology specialist?

Hematology expertise provides services in blood diseases and is important to know in detail all the procedures to be applied even in the smallest operation. Some of the technical training required to be a specialist in hematology include;

  • Acute leukemias
  • Hematology Laboratory
  • Tumor lysis syndrome
  • Hypoplastic anemias
  • Blood groups and transfusion reactions
  • Stem cells
  • Stem cell transplantation in the elderly

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What is a specialist in endocrinology, what does he do, how to become? Endocrinologist Salaries in 2022 https://parentraide-cancer.org/what-is-a-specialist-in-endocrinology-what-does-he-do-how-to-become-endocrinologist-salaries-in-2022/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 22:04:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/what-is-a-specialist-in-endocrinology-what-does-he-do-how-to-become-endocrinologist-salaries-in-2022/ What is an endocrinologist, what does he do, how to become an endocrinologist Salary 2022 An endocrinologist is a doctor who specializes in detecting and treating hormonal disorders that affect the endocrine system. Common disorders treated by an endocrinologist are: thyroid abnormalities, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol disorders and cancers of the endocrine glands. What does an […]]]>
What is an endocrinologist, what does he do, how to become an endocrinologist Salary 2022

An endocrinologist is a doctor who specializes in detecting and treating hormonal disorders that affect the endocrine system. Common disorders treated by an endocrinologist are: thyroid abnormalities, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol disorders and cancers of the endocrine glands.

What does an endocrinologist do? What are their duties and responsibilities?

  • Examine the medical history of the patient before the treatment and diagnosis process,
  • Tests to determine the possibility of problems with the endocrine gland,
  • Investigate and examine symptoms of hormonal imbalance,
  • Request laboratory tests in order to make a definitive diagnosis,
  • Determine the treatment program and explain it to the patient,
  • prescribe medication,
  • To perform surgery if necessary,
  • Counsel patients on diet and nutrition, hygiene and other preventive treatments.
  • Record patient medical information,
  • Respect for the privacy of patients,
  • Continue professional development.

What education is required to become a specialist in endocrinology?

To become an endocrinologist, it is necessary to fulfill the following criteria;

  • To obtain a bachelor’s degree from the six-year medical faculties of universities,
  • Specialize in Internal Medicine for four years by successfully passing the Medical Specialization Examination (TUS),
  • Do a minor specialization for three years by passing the minor specialization exam (YDUS).

Characteristics an endocrinologist should have

  • Have the physical and mental stamina to work long hours,
  • Be able to stay calm and make effective decisions in high stress situations,
  • Demonstrate excellent analytical skills,
  • Demonstrate verbal and written communication skills to clearly express medical conditions,
  • Approach patients with an empathetic attitude,
  • Have self-discipline.

Endocrinologist Salaries in 2022

As they progress in their careers, the positions they occupy and the average salaries of those in the position of endocrinology specialist are the lowest 41.990 TL, the average 52.480 TL, the highest 69.240 TL .

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HP Library Media Specialist Receives Award https://parentraide-cancer.org/hp-library-media-specialist-receives-award/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:50:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/hp-library-media-specialist-receives-award/ DUTCH PATENT — The Central New York Library Resources Council has announced that Julie Horwat, Library Media Specialist at Holland Patent Central School District, is the winner of its 2022 All-Star Library Award. Now in its seventh year, this award is open to libraries, archives, and museums and their staff in Onondaga, Oneida, Herkimer, and […]]]>

DUTCH PATENT — The Central New York Library Resources Council has announced that Julie Horwat, Library Media Specialist at Holland Patent Central School District, is the winner of its 2022 All-Star Library Award.

Now in its seventh year, this award is open to libraries, archives, and museums and their staff in Onondaga, Oneida, Herkimer, and Madison counties.

“Julie is an exceptional educational leader and continues to strive for excellence, which is reflected in her dedication and involvement with our students and her participation in professional development opportunities,” the announcement reads. “Julie continually trains herself to stay current with current teaching strategies that benefit our students.”

Nominations were received from library users and staff, and the winners were selected by a jury outside the CLRC service area. “We want our judges to be unbiased and choose winners based on the merit of their nominations,” said Marc Wildman, CEO of CRCL.

The Central New York Library Resources Council (CLRC) is one of nine library councils in New York State dedicated to helping libraries, museums, and archives with resource sharing, professional development, and more. . For more information, go online to www.clrc.org.

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Medical Matters Weekly welcomes SVMC sports medicine specialist https://parentraide-cancer.org/medical-matters-weekly-welcomes-svmc-sports-medicine-specialist/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:33:46 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/medical-matters-weekly-welcomes-svmc-sports-medicine-specialist/ Vermont Business Magazine Ivette Guttmann, MD, is a sports medicine specialist and former professional athlete who hopes to become an Olympic doctor. She is also the next guest of Weekly Medical Questions. The show airs on Facebook Live at 12 p.m. Wednesday, October 26. Weekly Medical Questions is produced by Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) […]]]>

Vermont Business Magazine Ivette Guttmann, MD, is a sports medicine specialist and former professional athlete who hopes to become an Olympic doctor. She is also the next guest of Weekly Medical Questions. The show airs on Facebook Live at 12 p.m. Wednesday, October 26.

Weekly Medical Questions is produced by Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) with cooperation from Catamount Access Television (CAT-TV). Viewers can see on facebook.com/svmedicalcenter and facebook.com/CATTVBennington. The show can also be viewed or downloaded as a podcast at svhealthcare.org/medicalmatters.

Dr. Guttmann practices sports medicine and non-surgical orthopedic care with SVMC Orthopedics, part of Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (SVMC) and Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) in Bennington. She received her medical degree from Universidad Autonoma de Centro America in Costa Rica and completed the pediatric residency program at San Juan City Hospital in Puerto Rico in 2012.

Additionally, she completed postgraduate training in primary care sports medicine at Albany Medical Center in New York City in 2013. She earned her bachelor’s degree in biology from Florida State University and an associate’s degree from Miami-Dade Community College in 1994.

She is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and holds an American Board of Family Medicine Certificate of Added Qualifications in Sports Medicine.

Additionally, Dr. Guttmann played professionally as a record quarterback for the Orlando Starz Independent Women’s Soccer League and captained the Orlando Mayhem, 2001 – 2002. adventure, basketball, mountain and road cycling, snowboarding, tennis and volleyball. She provided medical coverage for the New York Giants training camp in Albany, NY; several collegiate sports teams; and many adventure races.

Dr. Guttmann aspires to become a doctor at the Olympic Games. Initially, she will serve as the chief medical officer at the 2023 FISU World University Games in Lake Placid, NY, from January 7-21. The games will bring together more than 2,500 athletes and delegates from 600 universities and more than 50 nations to compete. in 12 sports and 86 medals. From Lake Placid, she will travel to the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs from January 22 to February 4. After that month-long training with elite athletes in Lake Placid and Colorado, she could be chosen to serve as a team doctor at an upcoming Olympics.

The show is broadcast on Facebook Live, YouTube and all podcast platforms. After the program, the video is available on public-access television stations in the region CAT-TV (Comcast channel 1075) and GNAT-TV (Comcast channel 1074), as well as on public-access stations across the United States.

About SVHCs:

Southwestern Vermont Health Care (SVHC) is a preeminent, comprehensive health care system that provides exceptional, convenient, and affordable care to communities in Bennington and Windham counties in Vermont, east of Rensselaer and Washington counties in New York and north of Berkshire County in Massachusetts. The SVHC includes the Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (SVMC), the Southwestern Vermont Regional Cancer Center, the Centers for Living and Rehabilitation, and the SVHC Foundation. SVMC includes 25 primary and specialty care practices.

Southwest Vermont Health Care is one of the most popular small rural health systems in the country. He is the recipient of the American Hospital Association’s 2020 Rural Hospital Leadership Award. Additionally, SVMC was ranked fourth nationally for the value of care it provides by the Lown Institute Hospital Index in 2020 and has received five-time Magnet® recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center for l excellence in nursing. The healthcare system is fortunate to have the support of platinum-level corporate sponsor Mack, a leading provider of contract manufacturing services and plastic injection molded parts based in Arlington, VT.

BENNINGTON, VT—October 26, 2022—Southwestern Vermont Medical Center

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Prince George cancer specialist’s research could help largely replace chemotherapy treatment worldwide https://parentraide-cancer.org/prince-george-cancer-specialists-research-could-help-largely-replace-chemotherapy-treatment-worldwide/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 23:09:57 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/prince-george-cancer-specialists-research-could-help-largely-replace-chemotherapy-treatment-worldwide/ Prince George cancer specialist Dr. Robert Olson and his local team have just made an international breakthrough in cancer treatment research. Dr. Robert Olson | Courtesy of UNBC This treatment could be adopted internationally as a replacement for chemotherapy in many cases in as little as five years, according to Dr. Olson. The team has […]]]>

Prince George cancer specialist Dr. Robert Olson and his local team have just made an international breakthrough in cancer treatment research.

Dr. Robert Olson | Courtesy of UNBC

This treatment could be adopted internationally as a replacement for chemotherapy in many cases in as little as five years, according to Dr. Olson.

The team has just concluded a trial that is now gaining international attention, using radiation treatment to aggressively attack cancer cells.

The technology is known as Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy (SABR-5), which is capable of delivering a high dose of radiation to a small target while sparing surrounding tissue.

According to Dr. Olson, this technology is a game-changer.

“Because you can deliver higher doses, you have better tumor control. We have shown that tumor control is greater than 90% at one year and 80% at three years.

This radiation therapy technique isn’t unique to Olson’s team, but their latest trial just saw it used in the most effective way the world has ever seen – the side effect rate is less than 5% at five years in more than 400 patients in the trial.

Other trials with the same technology have observed side effects at rates of 30%.

“Side effects were much lower using our techniques that we developed in British Columbia and applied in all six cancer centers, compared to other publications from other groups. We have shown this to be the safest use of SABR internationally.

This technique is very complicated to explain in layman’s terms, but Dr. Olson described it as tailoring radiation levels according to the location of the tumor.

“We make sure that we have strong dose drops to deliver low doses to normal tissue. It’s very technical and specific to the tissue you’re talking about – your brain or your spinal cord, in very different doses.

These techniques are now being used in several randomized controlled trials across the planet.

Dr Olson is leading one of these trials himself, which is taking place in 14 different locations, some as far away as the UK and Australia.

“He’s really leading the way in treatment, not just in the Prince George Center of the North, but internationally.

The treatment is used on cancer cells that have started to spread to up to five sites.

“When cancer spread from site to site, the conventional wisdom was that it was no longer curative,” he said. “We would give palliative treatment like easier chemotherapies… we challenged that paradigm, showing that people live longer when you aggressively treat cancer that has spread from one to five sites. Perhaps we will push this paradigm even further beyond five sites.

Olson says the way cancer treatment is done could change, from “palliative chemotherapy being the old standard treatment, to now aggressive SABR.”

He says it currently appears that this treatment could make the cancer much more curable.

“For one to five [tumor] sites, it seems to be a promising technique and you should consider being part of our trials. It will probably become the standard of care in the next five years or so. »

Olson said someone with 15 or more tumor sites would still be recommended chemotherapy.

In conclusion, Dr Olson said, “I always like to say I’m proud that we’re running these trials from Prince George.”

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