Cancer Specialist – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 15:22:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer Specialist – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 Whole patient matters to infectious disease specialist https://parentraide-cancer.org/whole-patient-matters-to-infectious-disease-specialist/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/whole-patient-matters-to-infectious-disease-specialist/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 15:04:02 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/?p=911 A thoughtful, funny and emotional hour-and-a-half phone interview with infectious disease specialist Dr. Steve Hennigan is followed up by an email from him a day or two later. In it, Hennigan elaborates on some of the topics touched upon in the earlier conversation. “Any story should have a wholeness to it,” Hennigan writes. “I think […]]]>

A thoughtful, funny and emotional hour-and-a-half phone interview with infectious disease specialist Dr. Steve Hennigan is followed up by an email from him a day or two later. In it, Hennigan elaborates on some of the topics touched upon in the earlier conversation.

“Any story should have a wholeness to it,” Hennigan writes. “I think what I told you isn’t quite complete. I would hope whatever you have to say about me will be a story that can move people to be their very best authentic selves.”

We often stereotype doctors as cool-as-cucumber, if not downright cold, professionals who operate in a didactic world of scientific order. Medical training sometimes includes classes on bedside manner, serving to emphasize the perception that warmth and empathy, or, at least, the ability to easily display it, is not something that always comes naturally to those that choose the profession. The conversation with Hennigan hints that he does not fall into that category, and follow-ups with those who know him best confirm it as fact.

“He would get down on his knees with a patient, eye to eye, cry with a patient — things that I had never seen before,” says Lisa Rojeski, a physician assistant, of the 15 years she has worked with Hennigan. “He is just a different level of compassionate.”

“Doing the work that I do, you see folks with all different levels of attunement to the people and living creatures around them,” says licensed professional counselor Bill Symes, a close friend of Hennigan’s. “Steve has this great emotional radar for when people are doing well and when they’re not doing well. He’s not only reading them in terms of, ‘Are we getting along? Do we trust each other?’ I think he’s also reading them in terms of, ‘Are they responding to the treatment? Are they feeling more energetic? Are they feeling more balanced?’ For some doctors, and I respect this, to pay attention to your patient’s emotional and physical health is just painful, because you’re picking up on their suffering, and Steve just seems to basically tune into that and use that as a feedback loop on what he needs to address in his patient.”

“Although he’s a specialized infectious disease doctor, he’s always connected to the whole person, their physical, emotional, psychological, spiritual and social makeup — he’s sensitive to that,” says Dr. Mark Thomas, a staff physician at Washington Regional Medical Center and vice president and medical director of Population Health. “He doesn’t look like a monk, and he doesn’t live like a monk — he has a regular family life, he’s had his ups and downs just like all of us have had — but he has this vocation to caring for people in the best way he knows how, and it comes out in every patient he takes care of. “

Renowned artist Hank Kaminsky met Hennigan decades ago, when Hennigan struck up a conversation with Kaminsky at the Fayetteville Farmers Market. The two became close friends.

“When it came to medical problems later on, he had another view from conventional medicine,” says Kaminsky. “It took into account other factors: emotional, mental and sociological factors. He wasn’t just a doctor. The whole idea of a doctor entering into a specialty, putting blindfolds on and only seeing their patients in terms of those specialties is a real limitation on the field of medicine. I think that Steve looks at the whole person. He just has an open heart, and he looks at everything through that lens of humanity.”

Another word that repeatedly comes up in conversations about Hennigan? “Creativity.”

“Doctors’ kids are creative, but doctors usually aren’t,” says Thomas. “It’s a special trait. When I say ‘creative,’ I don’t mean that he’s making up new treatments. He’s very up to date on the medical literature, ‘What are the latest treatments?”https://www.nwaonline.com/news/2021/oct/10/stephen-hennigan-md-whole-patient-matters-to/”What are the best treatments?”https://www.nwaonline.com/news/2021/oct/10/stephen-hennigan-md-whole-patient-matters-to/”How do you apply real time evidence to treating patients?’ All of that. But creativity also comes with a state of mind in which you can say, ‘What’s really going on here? Did I miss something?’ and, also, ‘What are the actual resources that are available to treat this, that we haven’t been thinking of, that might be applied to this particular patient?'”

Thomas has the perfect story to illustrate Hennigan’s medical creativity.

“One patient, I remember, had a terrible cancer that had manifested itself in a wound in the groin that just wasn’t healing, and it was eroding the deep tissue. Nothing we did worked — antibiotics, wound care, special beds that would remove all the weight from the different parts of the body. Then Dr. Hennigan got this idea — he had read this article, and he said what we needed to use was medical leeches. I looked at him and said, ‘What are you talking about, Stephen? This isn’t the Middle Ages!’ But they are perfectly acceptable treatment, if not widely used right now.”

The leeches helped, and, soon, the patient was discharged to continue his recovery at home. Hennigan, ever dedicated to his patients, was making home visits to check on his progress — and he asked Thomas to accompany him. There was one part of the process of using leeches he had trouble with: applying and removing them.

“He thought he could maybe use a little more help from me on the more squeamish part of it,” Thomas says.

“‘Why is this person sick?’ Maybe we’ve tried the basic stuff. Let’s try something a little different; there may not be a guideline for it,'” Rojeski says of Hennigan’s thought process. “It’s still safe medicine, and he’s seen it work for other people — it’s an art. ‘Let’s see if it works for you.'”

Symes says Hennigan’s post on the Board of the Holos Foundation, an organization “dedicated to integrating psychedelic medicines into the heartland region of the country as they become legally available,” is another example of Hennigan’s curiosity in the name of healing.

“His interest in the healing practices — he goes right to the fringe, ‘What can we include that would be effective in reducing suffering? If this is something that’s valuable, I’m going to pursue it, understand it, and apply it.’ It’s a part of his cutting edge mentality of general health: ‘How do we reduce suffering in the world?’ And I would say that’s an actual commitment he has.”

“I thought I was giving up creativity [when I chose the medical field], but, God, so much of taking care of patients is creative problem solving,” says Hennigan. “Sometimes I say I sort of muddled into where I am — and yet I can’t imagine being anywhere else, because I feel so privileged to get to do this. And, gosh, sometimes it feels kind of like magic — it truly does, because the things that people need are so much more than a prescription for an antibiotic. Sometimes people need to know that there’s hope. They think they’re going to die. They just need to know, ‘You shouldn’t die from this.’ Sometimes people need to know that their being has value and that hurting themselves through destructive behavior only takes their misery to a darker place. So it’s that ongoing fight to bring the best out of people on all levels.”


This singularity has been with Hennigan since he was a child, though it wouldn’t be until he was an adult that he found the terms that defined that difference.

“I rebelled against my father in the years that followed, up until about age 15,” he writes of the time right after his parents’ divorce, when his mother moved away and he lived with his father. The nation was embroiled in the Vietnam War, and the chaos in Hennigan’s own life seemed to echo the chaos of the era. “I acted out, ran away from home, hitchhiked across the country, somehow surviving all of that unscathed. But while I saw my own suffering in terms of the external issues of my day, the greater burden was really the terrifying knowledge that I wasn’t like the other kids around me. I was different. It was years later that I came to understand that I was on the autism spectrum, or, more accurately said, neurodiverse.

“My own personal journey has led me to a place of appreciation, of knowing that my differentness gives me particular strengths. I think as humans, our goal must be to be no one other than who we are. In honoring our differentness, we are better able to give of ourselves to those around us, indeed to the universe itself. Because there is absolutely no one else in this entire universe exactly like each one of us. That is our gift.”

Hennigan was born in rural Louisiana, to parents who had met in college: His mother, from Baton Rouge, came from a background of relative wealth, while his father, the son of a Pentecostal preacher, came from poverty. The only reason Hennigan’s father was able to go to college, in fact, was his athletic skill: His prowess in both track and field and football earned him a scholarship. Charles Hennigan Sr., as it turned out, was talented enough at football to turn pro. He was recruited to play for the Houston Oilers, and the young family moved to that big city when Hennigan was a child.

“He was actually, in his day, kind of famous — he made the first touchdown the Houston Oilers ever made,” says Hennigan. “I don’t think it was really optimal for me, because I could tell people who my dad was and get a crowd around me, wanting autographs.”

Hennigan was only 7 when his father’s career ended, and the family moved back to the farm in rural Louisiana. Both of his parents were involved in careers — or missions — that helped others: Charles Hennigan founded a learning center in Houston called the Hennigan Institute that offered education and counseling for students; he also tutored Louisiana prisoners who were attempting to earn GEDs. Hennigan’s mother was a staunch civil rights advocate.

“She received anonymous hate letters from the racists in our town,” says Hennigan. “I remember her weeping over the martyrs of the day.”

The couple divorced when Hennigan was 12, and, after his mother moved away from their small Louisiana town, he lived with his father. Hennigan survived the aforementioned rebellion and, by the age of 15, had settled down somewhat. When he graduated from his tiny high school, he was at a loss as to where to go from there. He loved playing the trumpet in his school band and briefly considered a career in music. Medicine wasn’t yet a blip on his radar.

“I went to college because that’s what you’re supposed to do,” he says. “Everybody talked about me being bright, but I got a C in high school chemistry because my lab notebook was sloppy. So when I went to college, I thought, ‘I don’t know what I’m going to do, but I’m not taking any science classes.’ So I would go to school, then I would quit and work. It took me seven years to get my undergraduate degree, and it was in liberal arts.”

He got married early — he was barely 20 — and his wife was going to medical school while he was contemplated his next steps. Her studies interested him.

“The idea of helping people was very appealing to me, and yet I understood that in medicine there were things that were hard, things as simple as wounds and all the things associated with being human, all the things that we think we wouldn’t want to do because, ‘Gee, that’s yucky,'” he says. “I was working in this produce company warehouse. I was sitting there all day long separating out rotten oranges from good oranges so we could sell the good oranges, and I kind of had this insight: ‘You can get used to anything.'”

It meant catching up on his prerequisites — since he had eschewed all science classes in his undergraduate years — but once he had, he was accepted to the medical program at Louisiana State University Medical Center in Shreveport. He felt intimidated at first, as he was surrounded by people who had been gunning for the medical field for their entire academic lives. That insecurity fueled his motivation, and his hard work paid off — he finished second in his class and went to Dartmouth to do his internal medicine residency.

“That was during the time of the AIDS epidemic,” he remembers. This next part is difficult for him to talk through. “It was so tragic. People were sick, and they were dying, and we didn’t have much to offer them. I’m always slow to decide what direction my life is going to take, but I had to be in infectious diseases, because that’s where history was. It just felt right to me.”

A year of internal medicine in rural West Virginia and a fellowship at Vanderbilt in Nashville in infectious diseases followed this revelation. He thought research and teaching was where he was headed — “the opportunity to creatively ask and answer questions was so appealing to me” — but, in 1994, when he came to Northwest Arkansas to visit a friend who was contemplating a job in the area, he fell in love.

“The area is just so amazing,” he says. “The country is so beautiful. The people in this area are so progressive and thoughtful. There’s the university, there are all these dynamic people in Rogers and Bentonville doing all of these interesting things, and there was nobody doing infectious diseases. I thought, ‘This is what I should do.'”


For the past year and a half, covid-19 has been one of the largest focuses of his practice. Though he is quick to say that those medical professionals on the front lines are the true heroes of the pandemic fight, he’s been helping to establish best practices in fighting the virus, and his careful, considered social media posts on the subject have been widely shared.

“The only way you can know an illness is to care for it,” he says of the virus’ first days. “So I was getting on the phone and calling friends in other places. ‘What does this look like? What does it feel like? How does it feel, standing at the bedside?’ I remember the first patient that I saw who was so sick — there’s such a brutal lethality about these people who get really sick. We’ve gotten better at taking care of it. But that dark brutality is still a part of what we see in healthcare. And I think that part of the problem with this is that the public doesn’t see that much. You hear people who have no respect for this infection because they’ve known 10 people or 50 people or however many who have had it, and it’s like a bad cold or flu. We’re saying, ‘No! You can’t imagine this! You don’t want this.’ The people we’re seeing now are almost all people who have chosen not to be immunized.”

“He is this man, flying through space: [that] is the image I get when I think of Steve and the pandemic,” says Kaminsky. “He was always busy, but now — sometimes the only time we get a chance to visit is texting at 12 o’clock at night. He would send me notes on something he had observed, and that was the way we had to talk, because he was just so busy. ‘Man with wings’ is the way I describe him during that period.”

The anti-vaccine and anti-mask movements have been frustrating and heartbreaking for Hennigan.

“Everything has become politicized; it’s become an ideology thing, which is heartbreaking, because these people that are all bowed up about masks and such, they’re just humans like everybody else — they’re going to suffer like everybody else,” Hennigan says. “What I try to do is be their advocate. I don’t want to ridicule some other human. I’ve been ignorant, personally, in ways I won’t even tell you about. None of us think perfectly, so why should I insult someone? And yet they just don’t understand. I’m going Monday to a school board meeting to talk about mask mandates. There are these people who stoutly oppose mask mandates because of ‘freedom.’ Three children have died in Arkansas. That’s not very many. But I’ve lost a son. I know what it feels like to lose a child.”

Hennigan’s son, Lucas Aaron Hennigan, died unexpectedly just four years ago. The result, says Hennigan, was a shift in his fundamental world view.

“Do you have children?” he asks, then, “I just pray you never have to go through that. It was the most painful thing I’ve ever been through in my life. But, sometimes, things are required of people, for whatever reason — things happen that we have no control over. When that happened, I felt really strongly that I had to treat that loss with reverence, to honor my son, to hold that pain and carry it in a way that was reverent. And it changed me — it still, to this day, hurts, but I’m more connected to the fabric of what life is, somehow. I think being a part of the reality of humanity, which includes suffering, is kind of a privilege.

“I’ve gotten to where I can look back on him with joy. Early on, you just want to draw back from it, because it hurts. But he was special. And I was privileged to get to be his dad. I think he led a complete life. He died when he was 30. But I have a lot to be joyful in him, and he’s still with me.”


Hennigan has been practicing in Northwest Arkansas for nearly 30 years, and his habits of intense research and careful experimentation mean he’s just about seen it all. But he lacks the hubris to actually think that way.

“I’m very aware of my own limitations,” he says. “I’ll tell patients I take care of, ‘This is what I think. I could be wrong.’ I’m quite transparent. I’m just as human as everybody else. I try to problem solve collaboratively with a patient, and I think there’s a value in that transparency, because the worst thing in the world is to pretend like you know everything.”

Those that practice alongside him, however, see things a little differently. Thomas says the duo often see patients who have been through doctor after doctor with no respite from their symptoms and are frustrated and out of hope by the time they reach Thomas and Hennigan.

“I would say [to them], ‘I have to tell you this — I can’t remember when he was wrong,” says Thomas. “‘I can’t remember when he made a diagnosis or made a treatment plan and was wrong. I think you’ll be very happy.’ And that seemed to cheer patients up a little bit.”

“I would say there’s a good possibility that he’s a true genius,” agrees Symes. “Sometimes arrogance goes with that, and that’s not Steve — he’s humble. He has a great respect for people in his field.”

The closest thing Hennigan is willing to admit?

“I am different,” he muses. “It hasn’t always been easy to be different. I had to come to a place where, you can only be who you are, right? If you’re anything else, if you’re inauthentic, you’re just a pretender. And that’s really bad, right? I think we have to accept each other’s differences. We just have to be the best person we can be, and then, all together, make this work.”

Dr. Steve Hennigan Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2021, Visit nwaonline.com/211010Daily/ for today’s photo gallery.
(NWA Democrat-Gazette/Andy Shupe)


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Self Portrait

Dr. Steve Hennigan

People might be surprised to find out I have a tattoo of the Buddhist Heart Sutra Mantra from ink made from the ashes of my late son.

The quote that resonates the most with me is Miguel de Unamuno (from his Tragic Sense of Life) “…And more light does not make more warmth. “Light, light more light!” they tell us the dying Goethe cried. No, warmth, warmth, more warmth! for we die of cold and not of darkness.”

My kryptonite is music.

The best advice I’ve ever received is to live in the present moment.

One thing that would get us closer to a perfect world is having empathy for the imperfect people around us. We’re all in this together.

The best gift I ever received was having children.


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Cambridge autism school raises vital funds in memory of staff and students https://parentraide-cancer.org/cambridge-autism-school-raises-vital-funds-in-memory-of-staff-and-students/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/cambridge-autism-school-raises-vital-funds-in-memory-of-staff-and-students/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 06:00:49 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cambridge-autism-school-raises-vital-funds-in-memory-of-staff-and-students/ Various parents, teachers, students from The Rectory, Gretton School Submitted for publication in the Cambridge News Staff and students from an autism school in Girton recently took part in a sponsored walk to benefit Cancer Research UK. The sponsored mile walk was hosted by Gretton School, a day and residential school specializing in autism for […]]]>

Various parents, teachers, students from The Rectory, Gretton School

Submitted for publication in the Cambridge News

Staff and students from an autism school in Girton recently took part in a sponsored walk to benefit Cancer Research UK.

The sponsored mile walk was hosted by Gretton School, a day and residential school specializing in autism for children and youth ages 5-19.

The challenging circuit took place around the village of Girton, with students and staff covering a total of 156 miles between them, raising an impressive £ 910 for their efforts.

This is a cause close to many in the school community, having tragically lost a wonderful Gretton student and beloved member of the school and local community, Sam Isaacson, to cancer this year.

A representative from the school said: “The students, staff and parents / guardians were naturally very excited to contribute to the event.

“The walk ended on a high note with parents / guardians invited to the school, some seeing the school inside for the first time due to Covid-19.”

Sasha Ambrose, physical education teacher and event organizer said, “We had a wonderful afternoon soaking up the last summer sun. Students and staff made the most of the beautiful local countryside by walking just over a mile each to raise money for cancer research.

“Some students ran and others completed more than one lap, all for a good cause. We are extremely proud of the students and their tremendous effort.

Alfie and Freddie, 9th grade students in the Mozart class at the Gretton School Manor Farm site

Beth Elkins, Principal of Gretton, said: “It was so nice to see the parents again after having to be so careful with school visitors over the past year; the cream tea on the parsonage lawn and the tours to the Manor Farm site were both great events.

“The students – as always – were they proud and that they were also able to raise over £ 900 for such a large charity was just the icing on the cake – or should it be cream on the cake? scone?”

The Cambridge News covers areas including, but not limited to Alconbury, Balsham, Cambourne, Duxford, Ely, Fen Drayton, Girton, Longstanton and the city of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire.

Get all the latest news, updates, things to do and more from your local InYourArea feed.


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Korean bamboo salt maker specialist Insan Bamboo Salt Co., Ltd. launches its products on the world market https://parentraide-cancer.org/korean-bamboo-salt-maker-specialist-insan-bamboo-salt-co-ltd-launches-its-products-on-the-world-market/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/korean-bamboo-salt-maker-specialist-insan-bamboo-salt-co-ltd-launches-its-products-on-the-world-market/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 03:26:14 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/korean-bamboo-salt-maker-specialist-insan-bamboo-salt-co-ltd-launches-its-products-on-the-world-market/ WEB WIRE – Thursday, October 7, 2021 Insan Bamboo’s bamboo salt making started with Insan Kim Il-hoon, the inventor of bamboo salt and founder of oriental cancer medicine, who invented bamboo salt and applied it to therapeutic purposes. By developing Miracle Capsule, a functional food for immune health that has dramatically improved the effectiveness of […]]]>

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Insan Bamboo’s bamboo salt making started with Insan Kim Il-hoon, the inventor of bamboo salt and founder of oriental cancer medicine, who invented bamboo salt and applied it to therapeutic purposes. By developing Miracle Capsule, a functional food for immune health that has dramatically improved the effectiveness of bamboo salt, the company is squarely targeting the natural atopic food for children market. In addition, the company continues to research and develop healthy foods with health benefits and anticancer effects, such as medicinal soy sauce, sari soy sauce (made from fermented black soybeans) and duck au sulfur. Bamboo salt is a 100% natural food without additives.

According to the company: Phosphoric Acid Bamboo Salt eliminates the toxicity of common salt and increases the active ingredients of bamboo and pine. In addition, Insan bamboo salt has effects such as detoxification, immune system enhancement, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and sterilization. The increased effectiveness of bamboo salt has been proven by numerous domestic and foreign studies. Bamboo salt is effective in relieving constipation and eliminating bad breath, with anti-inflammatory, anti-acne, and anti-cancer effects, including relief from gastrointestinal illnesses. The anticancer effect of kimchi extract has been medically verified with bamboo salt to kill cancer cells or stop their growth. Insan bamboo salt is also effective for tooth and gum disease and prevents tooth decay.

Bamboo salt is also used in cooking. Additional products available are Insan Bamboo Salt Toothpaste and Insan Bamboo Salt Soap Products.

Under the motto ?? contribute to the health of humanity ?? With various effects of bamboo salt (a natural product from Korea), Insan Bamboo Salt strives to research and develop methods of making healthy food and biopharmaceuticals with promoting health, improving disease and anti-cancer effects.

Insan Bamboo Salt is committed to actively promoting its products in various global markets.

(Image from press release: https://photos.webwire.com/prmedia/71383/280029/280029-1.png )

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Cancer specialist shares what can be learned from First Lady Casey DeSantis breast cancer diagnosis https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-specialist-shares-what-can-be-learned-from-first-lady-casey-desantis-breast-cancer-diagnosis/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-specialist-shares-what-can-be-learned-from-first-lady-casey-desantis-breast-cancer-diagnosis/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 17:10:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-specialist-shares-what-can-be-learned-from-first-lady-casey-desantis-breast-cancer-diagnosis/ MIAMI (CBSMiami) Florida First Lady Casey DeSantis has breast cancer. Governor Ron DeSantis shared the news Monday morning. It only happens a few days in October, which has been designated as Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Currently, the first lady has yet to explain what stage the cancer is at, but her husband said: “Casey is […]]]>

MIAMI (CBSMiami)

Florida First Lady Casey DeSantis has breast cancer. Governor Ron DeSantis shared the news Monday morning.

It only happens a few days in October, which has been designated as Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Currently, the first lady has yet to explain what stage the cancer is at, but her husband said: “Casey is a real fighter and she will never, ever, ever give up.”

“We know that most women are now diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 50,” said Dr. Jane Mendez, chief of surgery at the Miami Cancer Institute.

Casey DeSantis is not alone. The 41-year-old mother of three is now one of the thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

“At 41 years old, 1 in 217 women, 45 1 in 93, at 50 years old 1 in 50,” Dr. Mendez said.

The chances of being diagnosed increase with age.

“Eighty-five percent of breast cancers, which is the vast majority, happen sporadically, which means they don’t have it in their family, it happens out of the blue,” said Dr. Mendez.

This is why projections can make a difference in life or death. Annual mammograms for those over 40, but in some cases, for others, breast MRI exams, or even genetic tests for the youngest with a history.

“Usually, any woman diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50 is considered a candidate for genetic testing,” explained Dr Mendez.

When cancer is caught early, the chances of beating it are higher. Dr Mendez told CBS4 that 98.5% of patients who detect breast cancer at an early stage have a 10-year survival rate.

“South Florida is unique in that we have a very heterogeneous patient population,” she said.

This means that the message should be spread in different cultures and languages, but also to find out more about your ancestry and your chances of developing breast cancer.

“When you come from South or Central America or the Caribbean, you have to keep all this genetic mix in mind,” said Dr Mendez.

Between Latin and black women, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women with cancer.

“There is no such thing as a perfect diet, diet is more about being aware of what you eat and making sure of how you prepare the food and how much of the food you eat,” added Dr Mendez. .

While genetics play a role, explained Dr Mendez, it’s a small number, around 5% of breast cancers are hereditary. This is why lifestyle choices are contributing factors.

Doctors recommend that you exercise regularly, maintain a healthy weight, stay away from alcohol, and research hormone replacement therapy if necessary.

However, Dr Mendez couldn’t stress enough the importance of getting tested.


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Breast health specialist shares importance of early diagnosis https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-health-specialist-shares-importance-of-early-diagnosis/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-health-specialist-shares-importance-of-early-diagnosis/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:48:58 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/breast-health-specialist-shares-importance-of-early-diagnosis/ When it comes to breast cancer, testing and treatment as well as connecting with the right people for reliable knowledge is essential. A local breast health clinic, Pink Hibiscus offers cancer screenings, advanced treatments and awareness programs to provide accurate information and awareness of the disease. The center, known for its digital imaging device, the […]]]>

When it comes to breast cancer, testing and treatment as well as connecting with the right people for reliable knowledge is essential. A local breast health clinic, Pink Hibiscus offers cancer screenings, advanced treatments and awareness programs to provide accurate information and awareness of the disease.

The center, known for its digital imaging device, the only one of its kind in Trinidad and Tobago, ensures painless and accurate reading in a clean and comfortable environment. The organization is a member of the European Reference Organization for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services (EUREF) and is affiliated with members of the international breast health community, as its radiological images are read by a UK-based radiologist. -United.

Pink Hibiscus Breast Imaging Specialist Jyoti Deonarine, RR spoke with Loop news about her work, advocacy and passion for women’s breast health.

“If you had asked me on your way to high school, I would have said, ‘Radiology? What is that?’ She laughed, explaining how she fell into the field that ultimately led to her career in mammography and breast health.

“[Radiology] correlated with my hobby, which is photography, ”she said, referring to the practice as“ the eyes of medicine ”. “It’s the same thing [as photography]except that you can see inside people, so you have to be meticulous in capturing anatomy correctly.

Deonarine learned of the great demand for the estate and, after dropping out of high school, decided to give it a shot. She graduated from the first cohort of COSTAATT’s undergraduate radiology program and realized how much she really liked the curriculum. “The land found me,” she said.

After completing her studies locally, Deonarine traveled to the United States to major in mammography at the Medical Technology Management Institute (MTMI), where she also obtained a certificate in breast ultrasound.

Since his return, Deonarine has accumulated a wealth of experience; she is celebrating her seventh year at Pink Hibiscus.

She assured potential patients of the capabilities of the technology and of her own commitment to making the exam run as smoothly as possible. “I have a golden rule that [is to] ensuring that every woman has a painless mammogram, ”she said.

“Everyone thinks a mammogram is supposed to hurt,” Deonarine explained. “With my job and the equipment I work with I make sure that this is not the experience you get. [so] if you get a bad result, you won’t have been worried from the start.

Deonarine’s passion for the estate has only intensified over the years; she finds her job incredibly rewarding, not only for the opportunity to work with the latest technology, but also for its impact on women and their health, and the privilege of guiding them through an important process.

“The best part is you are helping a woman know her breast cancer status,” she shared. This knowledge is the first step in ensuring that breast health receives adequate attention, which, in the event of a cancer diagnosis, can set a patient on the path to early treatment and recovery.

Deonarine warned women who use COVID-19 as an excuse to delay their annual breast exams, explaining that many patients have decided to avoid contact with medical centers during the pandemic. She urged these women to prioritize their breast health, assuring them that knowing their health, despite the pandemic, is still crucial.

“Breast cancer does not know COVID,” she said, stressing the importance of early diagnosis. “There is no barrier that will protect you. You don’t want to wait until it’s too late.

She reassured that the organization takes its health measures seriously, explaining that the clinic had imposed the wearing of the mask before it was mandatory. Patients can also wait in their vehicles instead of being in the waiting room to wait for their exams to ensure minimum contact. A prequalification process, along with the risk assessment step, is part of the simple process that can be done over the phone.

Deonarine suggested that patients attend their screenings with a partner for moral support, adding that groups of friends can get girls checked every year.

“Our Caribbean people are sensitive to [breast cancer] and our ladies need to become more empowered to get their screenings, ”she said, citing the statistic that 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

The specialist explained that it is a common belief that breast health exams are for women 40 and older. “We have seen younger women being diagnosed with breast cancer,” she said. “Being aware of the breast begins when [a girl] starts to see her period. It’s not about family history anymore, ”added Deonarine, shattering the common myth.

Deonarine also shared that Pink Hibiscus is no stranger to outreach programs, honoring invitations to speak at events throughout the year.

Find out more about Pink Hibiscus via their Facebook and Instagram pages.



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Suck the breast, don’t chew it – Breast cancer specialist for men https://parentraide-cancer.org/suck-the-breast-dont-chew-it-breast-cancer-specialist-for-men/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/suck-the-breast-dont-chew-it-breast-cancer-specialist-for-men/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:22:03 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/suck-the-breast-dont-chew-it-breast-cancer-specialist-for-men/ Molecular geneticist and breast cancer specialist Dr Lily Paemka Molecular geneticist and breast cancer specialist Dr. Lily Paemka has advised men to be too careful with their partner’s breasts when they become intimate. According to her, the breast is the organ most reactive to hormones and therefore the most predisposed to medical conditions. Speaking to […]]]>

Molecular geneticist and breast cancer specialist Dr Lily Paemka

Molecular geneticist and breast cancer specialist Dr. Lily Paemka has advised men to be too careful with their partner’s breasts when they become intimate.

According to her, the breast is the organ most reactive to hormones and therefore the most predisposed to medical conditions.

Speaking to Francis Abban on Morning Starr as part of his breast cancer awareness campaign, the US-trained doctor urged men to suckle the breast and not chew it during intimacy instead. .

“Without the breast, there will be no life. It is the most reactive organ to hormones and therefore the most predisposed to medical conditions. Handle the breast with respect. Don’t disrespect him. Don’t chew it, suck it. This is what helps procreation and should receive maximum care and attention ”.

She also encouraged men to regularly help their partners screen their breasts for early detection of breast cancer.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is celebrated in countries around the world and helps increase attention and support for awareness, early diagnosis and treatment as well as palliative care for women facing to this disease.

There are an estimated 1.7 million new cases and 522,000 deaths from breast cancer each year [Globocan 2012 http://gco.iarc.fr/today/home]. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and the most common cause of cancer in women in most countries. In low- and middle-income countries, the incidence has increased steadily due to longer life expectancy, changes in reproductive patterns (such as older age at first childbirth and less breastfeeding). ) and the adoption of Western lifestyles.

Early diagnosis remains the cornerstone of the fight against breast cancer. When caught early and if proper diagnosis and treatment are available, there is a good chance that breast cancer can be cured.

If it is detected late, however, curative treatment is often no longer an option. In such cases, treatment can improve quality of life and delay disease progression, while supportive and palliative care should be readily available to alleviate the suffering of patients and their families.


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Social Media Specialist – Q City Metro https://parentraide-cancer.org/social-media-specialist-q-city-metro/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/social-media-specialist-q-city-metro/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/social-media-specialist-q-city-metro/ At OrthoCarolina, our team is our greatest asset and the foundation of our success; we share a common passion for improving life. We are a diverse group of individuals, accountable to one another through the backbone of our beliefs: trust, honesty and mutual respect; make sure our voice is heard. Our positive environment promotes individual […]]]>

At OrthoCarolina, our team is our greatest asset and the foundation of our success; we share a common passion for improving life. We are a diverse group of individuals, accountable to one another through the backbone of our beliefs: trust, honesty and mutual respect; make sure our voice is heard. Our positive environment promotes individual growth and a sense of belonging. Our employees work together to maintain standards of excellence and promote a teamwork environment throughout the organization.

If these attributes match the job culture you are looking for, then OrthoCarolina might be the right fit for you!

We have an opportunity with OrthoCarolina for a Social media specialist work with our marketing team.

The Social media specialist Supports content marketing and partnership needs with comprehensive management of all OrthoCarolina social media channels. This role works directly with the content team to develop and execute social media strategies to achieve marketing goals through the OrthoCarolina footprint and uses a creative mind and independent work ethic to research, manage, create and publish original, high-quality content.

The Social Media Specialist will also develop new audiences, groups and social media conversations to grow the OrthoCarolina community across all social channels; and builds relationships with OrthoCarolina team members to share their stories digitally and educate patients with relevant and useful content. Other tasks include:

  • Monitor analytics and use data to inform choices, improve social strategy, and formulate new initiatives.
  • Collects, tests, measures, evaluates and recommends extensive research to ensure campaign effectiveness and social impact results.
  • Bring innovative and data-driven ideas to the marketing team on a monthly basis

The ideal candidate will have strong writing skills that reflect OrthoCarolina’s voice and messaging goals and should be self-sufficient and can collaborate while working independently. Must be willing to take initiative as part of the collaborative content creation effort with the community partners / initiatives, this role may involve working certain nights and weekends.

A career at OrthoCarolina will provide you with career advancement opportunities, dedicated peer support and continuing education. Our company is committed to providing its employees with an extremely positive work environment. The benefits offered include:

  • Competitive salary package
  • Health, dental and vision insurance
  • Health savings account
  • Life insurance
  • Short / long term disability insurance
  • Tuition reimbursement
  • Voluntary home / auto insurance
  • Voluntary accident / cancer insurance
  • Voluntary legal shield / identity theft
  • Health Advocate – Employee Benefits Resource
  • 401 (k) pension plan
  • Profit sharing plan

OrthoCarolina is one of the nation’s leading independent academic orthopedic practices serving North Carolina and the Southeast since 1922. OrthoCarolina provides compassionate and comprehensive musculoskeletal care, including operative and non-operative care, diagnostic imaging and rehabilitation therapy. Widely known for musculoskeletal research and training, OrthoCarolina physicians have specialized expertise in the areas of foot and ankle, hip and knee, shoulder and elbow, spine. , sports medicine, hand, pediatric orthopedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation. We are committed to improving the lives of everyone we serve, providing first-rate patient care and personalized, compassionate service. Over 300 OrthoCarolina providers see more than one million patient visits in western North Carolina each year.

OrthoCaroline. You. Improved.

Education experience:

  • High school diploma or equivalent required.
  • 5 years of related marketing / social media experience preferred.
  • Experience including but not limited to Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Google Communities, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Pinterest, blogging and more.
  • Knowledge of social media platforms and analysis software (Sprout, Simply Measured, Sprinklr, Facebook Insights, etc.).
  • Graphic design and video editing experience is a plus but not required.


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Parents quit work to raise funds for specialized treatment for their daughter https://parentraide-cancer.org/parents-quit-work-to-raise-funds-for-specialized-treatment-for-their-daughter/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/parents-quit-work-to-raise-funds-for-specialized-treatment-for-their-daughter/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:08:03 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/parents-quit-work-to-raise-funds-for-specialized-treatment-for-their-daughter/ Play video The parents of a five-year-old girl from Bedfordshire are trying to raise funds to take her to America for treatment for the aggressive cancer she is battling. Doctors originally believed Poppy Bailey’s symptoms were due to what’s known as the lockdown blues. But she was later diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a rare disease that […]]]>

The parents of a five-year-old girl from Bedfordshire are trying to raise funds to take her to America for treatment for the aggressive cancer she is battling.

Doctors originally believed Poppy Bailey’s symptoms were due to what’s known as the lockdown blues. But she was later diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a rare disease that affects only around 100 British children a year.

Neurblastoma cancer first discovered in tumor around her heart has spread, despite 13 cycles of chemotherapy Credit: Family photo

His diagnosis, made when his little brother Oscar was only a few weeks old, changed the life of the family.

Poppy’s parents believe her best hope is a new medical procedure in the United States. But it costs £ 250,000. Her parents organize fundraising and crowdfunding events through JustGiving Princess Poppy


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Dana Farber Specialist Helps ‘Bridget The Brave’ Avoid Sedation During Cancer Treatment – Boston News, Sports, Weather, Traffic and Boston’s Best https://parentraide-cancer.org/dana-farber-specialist-helps-bridget-the-brave-avoid-sedation-during-cancer-treatment-boston-news-sports-weather-traffic-and-bostons-best/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/dana-farber-specialist-helps-bridget-the-brave-avoid-sedation-during-cancer-treatment-boston-news-sports-weather-traffic-and-bostons-best/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 02:53:21 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/dana-farber-specialist-helps-bridget-the-brave-avoid-sedation-during-cancer-treatment-boston-news-sports-weather-traffic-and-bostons-best/ WBZ news update for October 10, 2021WBZ-TV’s Nick Giovanni and Zack Green have your latest news and weather. 52 minutes ago Developer says he plans to turn Becker College properties into affordable homesA developer paid $ 10 million for 27 properties in Worcester. 1 hour ago WBZ morning forecast for October 10Zack Green has your […]]]>

WBZ news update for October 10, 2021WBZ-TV’s Nick Giovanni and Zack Green have your latest news and weather.

Developer says he plans to turn Becker College properties into affordable homesA developer paid $ 10 million for 27 properties in Worcester.

WBZ morning forecast for October 10Zack Green has your latest weather forecast.

Weather forecast WBZSarah Wroblewski has your latest weather forecast.

Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev faces new death penalty in High CourtThe Biden administration will try to persuade the Supreme Court this week to reinstate the death penalty for doomed Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Woman and baby escape home fire on Rose Point Avenue in WarehamWBZ-TV’s Ken MacLeod reports.

Rally demands Governor Baker to institute Indigenous Peoples Day in MassachusettsA crowd gathered and marched to State House in Boston in support of Indigenous peoples on Saturday.

Boston Marathon return sparks excitement among Boylston Street runners and businessesWBZ-TV’s Zinnia Maldonado reports.

Boston Marathon runners meet former running champions and shop for gear at Fan FestReporting by Paul Burton of WBZ-TV.

WBZ Evening Forecast for October 9Sarah Wroblewski has your latest weather forecast.

WBZ news update for October 9Ken MacLeod and Sarah Wroblewski have your latest weather news and headlines.

Moose charges ex-cop in Woods of AyerAyer police were attempting to lock up a moose to prevent it from colliding with busy roads.

WBZ news update for October 9, 2021Anna Meiler and Zack Green from WBZ-TV have your latest news and the weather.

Woman and baby escape from Wareham fire caused by hoverboardFirefighters believe the blaze was started by a charged hoverboard.

WBZ morning forecast for October 9Zack Green has your latest weather forecast.

WBZ ForecastEric Fisher updated the weather forecast.

Boston police sergeant suspended for 10 days for statements on body camera during Floyd protestsA Boston police officer has been suspended for 10 days for comments made on a body-worn camera during the George Floyd protests.

Excitation Building before the Boston MarathonAn opening ceremony in Copley Square kicked off the Boston Marathon weekend. WBZ-TV’s Kristina Rex reports.

Vigil organized for a shot dead man in BrocktonFamily and friends remembered Christopher Gomes, who was shot and killed in Brockton. WBZ-TV’s Juli McDonald reports.

Dozens of vehicles catch fire at Taunton auctionWBZ-TV’s Zinnia Maldonado reports.

WBZ Evening News update for Friday October 8, 2021Brockton High School student arrested after bringing gun to school; Two parents convicted of corruption charges; Boston Marathon weekend forecast.

Professional runners prepare for the Boston MarathonThere are approximately 140 elite runners in this year’s Boston Marathon. WBZ-TV’s Levan Reid reports.

WBZ Evening Forecast for October 8, 2021Eric Fisher has your latest weather forecast.

“Anyone can win”. 4-time Boston marathon runner talks about what he loves about BostonWBZ-TV’s Lisa Hughes chats one-on-one with Abdi Abdirahman


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Addiction specialist challenges people to have a ‘sober October’ – FOX 2 https://parentraide-cancer.org/addiction-specialist-challenges-people-to-have-a-sober-october-fox-2/ https://parentraide-cancer.org/addiction-specialist-challenges-people-to-have-a-sober-october-fox-2/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 13:40:19 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/addiction-specialist-challenges-people-to-have-a-sober-october-fox-2/ Disabled vet struggles to drive his mobility device on the road outside his workplace Local News / 2 days ago Video FOX Files: St. Louis Justice Center lawsuit demands missing video Local News / 4 days ago Video VA patient dies by suicide at John Cochran VA medical center Local News / 5 days ago […]]]>

Disabled vet struggles to drive his mobility device on the road outside his workplace

Local News /

FOX Files: St. Louis Justice Center lawsuit demands missing video

Local News /

VA patient dies by suicide at John Cochran VA medical center

Local News /

FOX Files: Lawyer calls Missouri governor’s fight over publication of files “unprecedented”

Local News /

FOX Files: Woman who saw Potosi’s man before his death said he was delighted to be arrested

Local News /

FOX Files: Potosi man texted asking for help, later found dead

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Wellston residents want action taken to demolish vacant homes

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Pam Hupp’s lawyers withdraw request for speedy trial

Local News /

FOX files: suspect charged with murder of St. Louis man could be released due to trial delays

Local News /

FOX files: “Death to America”, other graffiti messages painted by a man in the same neighborhood

Local News /

FOX Files: Man says police only recently learned he was shot on the highway a few months ago

Local News /

Reign owner fails to show up at critical public safety hearing

Local News /


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