Cancer treatment – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://parentraide-cancer.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Cancer treatment – Parentraide Cancer http://parentraide-cancer.org/ 32 32 New data reveals that 4 out of 5 breast cancer patients https://parentraide-cancer.org/new-data-reveals-that-4-out-of-5-breast-cancer-patients/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/new-data-reveals-that-4-out-of-5-breast-cancer-patients/ Brussels, Nov. 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — If you were diagnosed with cancer, you would hope for the chance to benefit from the latest advances in the field of oncology. However, early data from a recent survey of patients in five European countries by Cancer Patients Europe (CPE), with support from Exact Sciences, demonstrates that […]]]>

Brussels, Nov. 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — If you were diagnosed with cancer, you would hope for the chance to benefit from the latest advances in the field of oncology. However, early data from a recent survey of patients in five European countries by Cancer Patients Europe (CPE), with support from Exact Sciences, demonstrates that the majority of breast cancer patients eligible for testing genomics didn’t even know that was an option. for them.

Genomic testing allows eligible patients with early-stage breast cancer to benefit from personalized or precision medicine. Used as a therapeutic aid by doctors to tailor treatment plans to their patients’ individual cancers, genomic testing can help with some treatment decisions, including whether patients are likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Therefore, it can spare many women with early-stage breast cancer chemotherapy and associated side effects. Despite the growing importance and usefulness of personalized medicine, the survey showed that 59% of all respondents had never heard of it.

“The data shows that there is an urgent need to raise awareness and understanding of the value of genomic testing in breast cancer across Europe, among healthcare professionals, patients, policy makers and payers,” says Dr. Fatima Cardoso, member of the advisory committee of the myC survey. and Director of the Breast Unit, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal. “Genomic testing has proven its value with high evidence, and it’s also cost-effective. However, it is not reimbursed or readily available in many European countries.

Additionally, the survey data underscores the need to make more information available to patients throughout their cancer diagnosis and treatment, especially from the healthcare professionals they cited. as their preferred source of information. Specifically, respondents said they would have liked to have received more information about their type of cancer, additional tests, treatment options and the long-term effects of treatment.

“The survey results bring to light shocking truths in the treatment and management of cancer patients across Europe,” said Conchi Biurrun, Secretary to the Board, CPE. “Cancer Patients Europe is committed to accelerating discussions with policymakers and other key stakeholders to raise awareness of genomic testing and ensure its implementation in routine clinical practice to help determine whether patients should undergo chemotherapy.”

Dr Steven Bellamy, Medical Director, International, Exact Sciences, said: “We are delighted to support CPE’s myC initiative, a program which is proving essential to our understanding of cancer care in Europe. As the data points to a significant gap in knowledge about genomic testing, this collaboration supports an important common goal: to help patients, and we are honored to be a part of it.”

About the myC Genomics and Breast Cancer Patient Survey

  • The 42-question survey was completed by a total of 1,383 respondents across five countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK) over a six-week period in September/October 2022.
  • Eighty-three percent (83%) of respondents were breast cancer patients, 50% of whom were eligible for genomic testing.
  • Eighty-four percent (84%) of eligible patients said they did not have enough information to make a decision on whether to undergo genomic testing.
  • Only a quarter (25%) of eligible patients had a genomic test.

About Cancer Patients Europe (CPE)

Cancer patients Europe is a recently created pan-European and pan-cancer association. The association’s mission is to provide a balanced representation of cancer patients and their experiences across Europe, bridging the gap between the implementation of European and national practice and reducing the burden of cancer on patients and survivors, their caregivers, health systems and society as a whole.

About my cancer my concern (myC) Initiative

my C is a CPE initiative that aims to raise awareness of the benefits and values ​​of genomic testing in oncology. Personalized treatment decisions are key to this effort and genomic testing is an example of current advances in this area. The project is part of the CPE’s wider aim to improve cancer management for patients across Europe and to call European decision-makers to action.

The myC initiative is supported by Exact Sciences, a cancer diagnostics company.

        
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After a cancer diagnosis, friends plan benefits for Grand Forks woman who quietly impacted her community https://parentraide-cancer.org/after-a-cancer-diagnosis-friends-plan-benefits-for-grand-forks-woman-who-quietly-impacted-her-community/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 01:49:38 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/after-a-cancer-diagnosis-friends-plan-benefits-for-grand-forks-woman-who-quietly-impacted-her-community/ Nov. 17—GRAND FORKS—For years, Seanna Smart has quietly served the Grand Forks community. She was a long-time obstetrics nurse at Altru, is involved in the ministry of the HOPE church and has helped others through home care. Now a group of his close friends are hoping to rally community support to give back to Smart. […]]]>

Nov. 17—GRAND FORKS—For years, Seanna Smart has quietly served the Grand Forks community. She was a long-time obstetrics nurse at Altru, is involved in the ministry of the HOPE church and has helped others through home care. Now a group of his close friends are hoping to rally community support to give back to Smart.

In September, Smart was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer. To help financially support Smart and her family through the coming months of treatment and recovery, a group of about 10 friends organized the Seanna Strong Benefit, which takes place at the Alerus Center beginning at 3 p.m. on Saturday, November 19. The event will include a pasta dinner, silent and live auction, live music and more.

Katie Langerud, a longtime friend of Smart’s, hopes the financial assistance generated by the benefit will relieve some of the stress of cancer treatment for Smart and her family. Smart’s husband, Scot, works as a firefighter in Grand Forks and her three children Brody (15), Adley (12) and Emree (9) all go to school in Grand Forks.

“Financially it’s going to be tough and if you can take that away from someone having to worry about it, life just seems a little bit easier,” she said.

The Smart family has always lived in Grand Forks, and through her work as a nurse and home health aide, Smart has impacted the lives of many others in the community, Langerud said.

“She always gives so much to others throughout her career,” Langerud said.

Smart is also deeply involved in her religious community. Friend Nicole Morris met Smart at HOPE Church in Grand Forks and their families grew close over the years. She says everyone Smart meets is treated with the same care.

“His presence is really what impacts the community and the people,” she said. “She loves people, she loves talking to people and she loves serving people.”

For Smart, the root of his service has always been living a life of benevolence.

“Kindness can go so far because you never know what someone is going through,” Smart said. “I’m very, very passionate about this, long before this cancer deal.”

Langerud, along with Bonnie Hillerud and other close friends of Smart, have been planning Saturday’s performance for months, networking and reaching out to local businesses for donations of auction items.

Hillerud says seeing the support from other community members when they heard Smart’s story was eye-opening.

“We live in an ugly world, and the beauty that comes out of it with how much people actually care about it has been amazing,” Hillerud said.

Ahead of the benefit, Friends of Smart gathered 75 silent auction baskets, 30 live auction items and 15 raffle items from thousands of dollars in donations from businesses and individuals in the Grand Forks community and beyond.

“It was amazing,” Hillerud said. “Especially when they don’t even really know her. It’s just something that’s amazing to me.”

Smart says she’s impressed with the hard work her friends and community at large have come together to support her.

“The upside isn’t even there, but I’ve seen the pieces come together and heard some of the things they’ve talked about, and I’m just in pure gratitude,” she said. .

So far, the cancer treatment is going well, says Smart. She gives credit to her family, her support system and her faith, and is determined not to let cancer define her.

“I would never capitalize the word ‘cancer’,” she said. “I don’t care if it’s at the start of a sentence and the grammar is wrong for me, no punctuation, I won’t because I’ll never give it that power.”

Through cancer treatment, Smart is still striving to spread kindness and help others along her journey. She says she is interested in starting a cancer support group in Grand Forks for other people with cancer and cancer survivors.

Prior to his cancer diagnosis, his family moved to a farm outside of town and eventually plans to build a barn that will serve as a space for youth in the community to gather, learn and grow in faith.

“That’s our plan of action going forward – to be able to serve the community,” she said. “My husband and I love kids, so we’re really looking forward to this coming to fruition.

The benefit for Smart is Saturday, November 19 from 3-11 p.m. at the Alerus Center. In addition to the silent auction, live auction and pasta food, the benefit will also include a photo booth, kids’ activities and raffle tickets. More information about the benefit can be found on the

Seanna Strong Advantage

Facebook event page.

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‘Miniature bone marrow in a dish’ to improve cancer treatments https://parentraide-cancer.org/miniature-bone-marrow-in-a-dish-to-improve-cancer-treatments/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:19:26 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/miniature-bone-marrow-in-a-dish-to-improve-cancer-treatments/ Scientists from the University of Oxford and the University of Birmingham have created the first bone marrow ‘organoids’ that capture key features of human bone marrow. This technology, which is the subject of a patent application filed by the University of Birmingham Enterprise, will allow the screening of several anti-cancer drugs at the same time, […]]]>

Scientists from the University of Oxford and the University of Birmingham have created the first bone marrow ‘organoids’ that capture key features of human bone marrow. This technology, which is the subject of a patent application filed by the University of Birmingham Enterprise, will allow the screening of several anti-cancer drugs at the same time, as well as the testing of personalized treatments for cancer patients.

A study published in the journal Discovery of cancerdescribes the new method, which results in an organoid that faithfully models the cellular, molecular, and architectural characteristics of myelopoietic (production of blood cells) bone marrow.

Research has also shown that organoids provide a microenvironment that can accept and support the survival of cells from patients with malignant blood tumors, including multiple myeloma cells, which are notoriously difficult to maintain outside the human body. .

Dr Abdullah Khan, Sir Henry Wellcome Fellow at the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and first author of the study, said: “Remarkably, we found that their bone marrow organoid cells resemble true bone marrow cells, not just in terms of their activity and function, but also in their architectural relationships – cell types “self-organize” and arrange themselves within organoids, just as they do in body human bone marrow. »

This realistic architecture allowed the team to study how bone marrow cells interact to support normal blood cell production, and how this is disrupted in bone marrow fibrosis (myelofibrosis), where scar tissue s accumulates in the bone marrow, causing bone marrow failure. Bone marrow fibrosis can develop in patients with certain types of blood cancers and remains incurable.

The study’s lead author, Professor Bethan Psaila, a haematologist and research group leader at the Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, said: “To fully understand how and why blood cancers develop, we need to use experimental systems that closely resemble how real human bone marrow works, which we didn’t really have before. It’s really exciting to now have this great system, because finally we are able to study cancer directly using our patients’ cells, rather than relying on animal models or other more simple ones that don’t show us correctly how cancer grows in the bone marrow in real patients. »

Dr Khan also added: “This is a huge step forward, leading to a better understanding of cancer cell growth patterns and potentially a more personalized approach to treatment. We now have a platform that we can use to test drugs on a “personalized medicine” basis.

“Having developed and validated the model is the crucial first step, and in our ongoing collaborative work, we will work with others to better understand how bone marrow functions in healthy people and what goes wrong when they have blood diseases.”

Dr. Psaila added: “We hope this new technique will help accelerate the discovery and testing of new blood cancer treatments, enabling our patients to get improved drugs to clinical trials faster.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by University of Birmingham. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Sunday Life Friends’ Spirit of Sport winner raises money for cancer treatment https://parentraide-cancer.org/sunday-life-friends-spirit-of-sport-winner-raises-money-for-cancer-treatment/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 17:22:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/sunday-life-friends-spirit-of-sport-winner-raises-money-for-cancer-treatment/ Dozens of supporters are supporting Aidan O’Neill, winner of the Sunday Life Spirit of Northern Ireland award, in his bid to beat pancreatic cancer. idan received the Spirit of Sport award two months ago in recognition of his work in establishing Run-Anon – a running club in Crumlin which since its inception in 2015 has […]]]>

Dozens of supporters are supporting Aidan O’Neill, winner of the Sunday Life Spirit of Northern Ireland award, in his bid to beat pancreatic cancer.

idan received the Spirit of Sport award two months ago in recognition of his work in establishing Run-Anon – a running club in Crumlin which since its inception in 2015 has raised over £30,000 for good causes.

An appeal has now been launched to generate a similar sum and pay for treatment which he hopes will save his life.

The former butcher and garbage collector (56) has been racing since the age of 18.

He’s run countless marathons and half-marathons – and even a 100-mile race in 24 hours.

However, two months after finishing second in a race just over a year ago, Aidan had the first signs that he was soon to face his biggest challenge yet.

Since being diagnosed with cancer, he has been undergoing chemotherapy to shrink the tumor in hopes it will break off from an artery and allow surgeons to operate.

“I wasn’t well last Christmas, then in January they diagnosed me with cancer,” he said.

“I thought everything was falling apart.

“But I hope now that they can take me to England for laser treatment because, at the moment, they say I am not operable.

“I just hope and pray that the tumor comes out of my main artery so they can operate.

“Fingers crossed I will train again next year and start racing again.

“I’m so lucky to have good friends and family around me who help me all the time.

“It’s so difficult sometimes.

“I hope that next year the situation will change and that I will start racing again.

“We need it to get away from my artery.

“It has to come off my artery so they can operate to remove it.”

Brave but humble friends of the father-of-three from Run-Anon, where he is the head coach, have mobilized an online campaign to try and raise the £28,000 for the specialist treatment – an astonishing start to more than 10 £000 was raised in the first 24 hours of its launch.

It’s proof of how much Aidan is loved and respected in his local community, whose members hope to spread his story far and wide.

They created a GoFundMe page titled “Help Aidan get SABR treatment for his cancer.”

Friends said: ‘We sought expert help privately, after speaking to someone who was inoperable and then became operable through the use of SABR treatment.

“That help was with Dr. James Good of Genesis Care.

“Dr Good presented Aidan’s case to a team of specialists in Oxford who concluded that Aidan might be eligible for an operation called the Appleby procedure if he had another response to treatment.

“We know times are tough for people and we would really appreciate it if you could spare a few pounds to fund this treatment to give Aidan the best possible chance of beating the terrible disease of pancreatic cancer.”

To donate to the appeal, visit https://gofund.me/22c86524

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Consumer Health: Treating Liver Cancer | Health https://parentraide-cancer.org/consumer-health-treating-liver-cancer-health/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 12:18:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/consumer-health-treating-liver-cancer-health/ More than 41,000 new cases of primary liver cancer and cancer of the intrahepatic bile ducts will be diagnosed in the United States this year, and more than 30,000 people will die from these diseases, according to the American Cancer Society. Liver cancer is cancer that starts in the cells of your liver, which is […]]]>

More than 41,000 new cases of primary liver cancer and cancer of the intrahepatic bile ducts will be diagnosed in the United States this year, and more than 30,000 people will die from these diseases, according to the American Cancer Society.

Liver cancer is cancer that starts in the cells of your liver, which is a football-sized organ located in the upper right part of your abdomen. The liver is essential for digesting food and ridding your body of toxic substances.

Intrahepatic bile duct cancer, which is sometimes classified as a type of liver cancer, occurs in the parts of the bile ducts inside the liver. The bile ducts carry bile, a digestive fluid, and they connect your liver to your gallbladder and your small intestine.

Sometimes the cause of liver cancer is known, as in the case of chronic hepatitis. But sometimes liver cancer occurs in people with no underlying disease, and it is not known what is causing it. Factors that increase the risk of liver cancer include chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis C infection, diabetes, and excessive alcohol consumption.

If you have been diagnosed with liver cancer, your healthcare professional will work to determine the extent or stage of the cancer. Staging tests help determine the size and location of the cancer and whether it has spread. Imaging tests used to determine the stage of liver cancer include CT scans, MRIs, and bone scans.

Treatment

Treatment for primary liver cancer depends on the stage of the disease, as well as your age, general health, and personal preferences.

Treatment options may include:

Operation

Surgical treatments include:

• Surgery to remove the tumour: Your healthcare team may recommend an operation to remove liver cancer and a small amount of healthy liver tissue around it if your tumor is small and your liver function is good. This recommendation also depends on where your cancer is in the liver and your general health.

• Liver transplant surgery: During liver transplant surgery, your diseased liver is removed and replaced with a healthy liver from a donor. Liver transplant surgery is only an option for a small percentage of people with early-stage liver cancer.

Spot treatments

Spot treatments include:

•Heating cancer cells: Radiofrequency ablation uses electrical current to heat and destroy cancer cells.

• Freezing cancer cells: Cryoablation uses extreme cold to destroy cancer cells.

•Injecting alcohol into the tumor: During alcohol injection, pure alcohol is injected directly into the tumors, either through the skin or during an operation, which causes the death of the tumors. tumor cells.

•Inject chemotherapy drugs into the liver: Chemoembolization is a type of chemotherapy treatment that delivers powerful anti-cancer drugs directly to the liver.

• Placing beads filled with radiation in the liver: Tiny spheres containing radiation can be placed directly in the liver, where they can deliver radiation directly to the tumor.

Radiotherapy

This treatment uses high-powered energy from sources such as X-rays and protons to destroy cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation therapy may be an option if other treatments aren’t possible or haven’t helped. For advanced liver cancer, radiation therapy may help control symptoms.

Targeted drug therapy

Targeted drug treatments focus on specific abnormalities present in cancer cells. By blocking these abnormalities, targeted drug treatments can cause cancer cells to die. Many targeted drugs are available for the treatment of advanced liver cancer.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy uses your immune system to fight cancer. Your body’s disease-fighting immune system may not attack your cancer because cancer cells produce proteins that blind immune system cells. Immunotherapy works by interfering with this process. Immunotherapy treatments are usually reserved for people with advanced liver cancer.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill fast-growing cells, including cancer cells. Chemotherapy can be given through a vein in your arm, as a pill, or both. Chemotherapy is sometimes used to treat advanced liver cancer.

Palliative care

Palliative care is specialized medical care aimed at relieving pain and other symptoms of a serious illness. Hospice palliative care specialists work with you, your family and other healthcare professionals to provide an extra layer of support that complements your ongoing care.

Palliative care can be used during other aggressive treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. When palliative care is used with all other appropriate treatments, people with cancer can feel better and live longer.

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Cancer patients in rural Maine now drive even further for treatment https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-patients-in-rural-maine-now-drive-even-further-for-treatment/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 11:09:06 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/cancer-patients-in-rural-maine-now-drive-even-further-for-treatment/ Service deferrals at a Penobscot County cancer care center mean cancer patients in Washington County have to drive even further for treatment, or delay it. Almost all cancer patients in Washington County receive treatment at the Lafayette Family Cancer Institute in Brewer, says East Machias family nurse practitioner Christine Moulton, but three months ago Lafayette […]]]>

Service deferrals at a Penobscot County cancer care center mean cancer patients in Washington County have to drive even further for treatment, or delay it.

Almost all cancer patients in Washington County receive treatment at the Lafayette Family Cancer Institute in Brewer, says East Machias family nurse practitioner Christine Moulton, but three months ago Lafayette stopped accepting most new patients.

“Now we have no idea where they will receive treatment, but wherever it is, patients will have to travel 6 to 12 hours round trip,” Moulton said. “This not only represents a crisis for residents of Washington County, but for all residents of Maine north of Waterville.”

Moulton first learned of the postponements in late August after several of his patients received preliminary diagnoses of cancer.

“These patients weren’t ready for referral to Brewer because they were still getting tests for the final diagnosis, but I knew they would end up there,” Moulton said.

Lafayette, a department of Northern Light Health, cites nationwide oncology staffing shortages and an increase in new cancer cases as the cause of the postponement decision. The rise in new cancer patients is partly because many people delayed cancer screenings during the pandemic, says Northern Light communications specialist Kris Currier.

“To ensure that our current patients receive the level of care they expect and deserve, Northern Light Cancer Care has made the difficult decision to temporarily defer some new medical oncology patient referrals,” Currier said. “This temporary adjustment ensures that we are able to safely meet the needs of our current patients.”

Getting to appointments in other counties can be difficult, if not impossible, for those who don’t have a vehicle, don’t have a driver’s license, or are too ill to travel for hours without being accompanied.

Under certain conditions, Lafayette is still accepting new patients, including referrals for returning patients, staff who are diagnosed, patients diagnosed by Northern Light oncologists while in hospital, people who require simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments and Northern Light patients. practices.

Everyone else is referred to one of four central and central Maine cancer care centers, which means traveling long distances that add hardship to the disease, Moulton says.

“You can imagine it’s bad enough traveling two hours to Brewer, but it’s manageable,” Moulton said. “But now you have to go to Rockland or Waterville or Augusta or Brunswick.”

Former cancer patient Holly Whitney of Marshfield received treatment in Lafayette, about 85 miles away, and said even getting to a clinic as close, relatively speaking, as Brewer was difficult during chemotherapy.

“You get nauseous and then you have to travel on bumpy roads,” Whitney said. “That’s too much for most patients.”

A rural struggle

Even before the postponements, cancer patients in Washington County were working hard to receive care, says Angela Fochesato, executive director of the Beth C. Wright Cancer Resource Center, which serves Washington and Hancock counties.

“We don’t have a lot of resources here, so patients with chronic conditions, in general, don’t get services. People in Washington County don’t have the same comforts as people in other Maine counties,” said Fochesato, who previously worked as a cancer navigator at Healthy Acadia. “Northern Light is doing what it can with what it has. There’s a silver lining to COVID – now we know we have a lot of fractures in our medical system.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death nationally (behind heart disease), but the leading cause of death in Maine, which ranks eighth nationally, and first in New England for the highest cancer rate. Of Maine’s 16 counties, Washington County has the third highest incidence of all cancers, at 520.4 cases per 100,000 population behind Piscataquis (539.9) and Penobscot (524.7) counties. , for the years 2015-2019, most recent data available.

Even so, according to a 2017 transportation needs assessment conducted by the Maine Cancer Foundation (MCF), most Washington County residents are more than 80 miles from a radiation center.

“A lack of oncologists in rural parts of the state, particularly in Washington County and southern Aroostook County, is resulting in excessive travel distances,” it read. the MCF assessment. “These areas would benefit most from having access to nearby oncologists.”

Solutions

There are no oncologists working in Washington County. To improve access to oncologists efficiently and quickly, Moulton says hospitals should expand their use of telemedicine. Not all aspects of cancer care can be managed remotely, but visiting the oncologist could be, she says.

“By the time the patient arrives at the oncologist, he has had blood tests, CT scans, MRIs, he has had a biopsy, a tissue sample, a pathology report, and he has a stage and a name” , Moulton said. “The physical exam that the oncologist does in that first encounter doesn’t add a lot of additional information to the treatment plan – you can do that through telemedicine. We don’t need a local oncologist, we just need good television.

What telemedicine can’t create is access to chemotherapy infusion appointments, notes Moulton, a cancer care service also not available in Washington County.

But one bright spot from Machias is making life easier for cancer patients – Moulton, Fochesato and Whitney all rent the Down East Community Hospital’s infusion clinic, where patients can receive supportive chemotherapy drugs and others services, much closer to home.

“I had a standing order to get fluids there, and it saved my life. I went from feeling terrible to feeling like I could function,” Whitney said. praise to the nurses at the infusion clinic. They took good care of me.”

Could the infusion clinic at Machias Hospital be expanded to also include chemotherapy services? It’s not out of the question, says DECH director of marketing and communications Julie Hixson, but it’s not close either.

“Over the years we have looked for ways to bring chemotherapy to the hospital and we continue to do so. So far it hasn’t been viable, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to give up,” Hixson said. “It doesn’t look like we’ll be able to bring chemotherapy to Washington County in the immediate future, but we will continue to increase therapeutics in our infusion clinic to reduce the number of long drives.”

Getting There

In the absence of local services, Washington County patients must travel to other counties. Getting there can be difficult, if not impossible, for those who don’t have a vehicle, don’t have a driver’s license, or are too ill to travel for hours unaccompanied.

“Transportation is a huge, huge problem,” Fochesato said.

Some government services pay for transportation to and from appointments, such as ModivCare, available to MaineCare clients, but program limitations mean patients can’t make other important stops, like at the pharmacy, on the way return. That’s where agencies like Beth C. Wright, Downeast Community Partners and Ellsworth-based Friends in Action are trying to fill the void, often with financial support from the nonprofit Maine Cancer Foundation.

“Our Downeast partnerships have had a tremendous impact,” said MCF Executive Director Ray Ruby, noting that MCF shifted its focus from research to programs in 2015. “Over the past seven years, we have invested $2.1 million in Hancock and Washington counties for transportation, as well as other major areas of need.

Fochesato would like to see more federal funds dedicated to patient service programs like transportation, palliative care and home health services.

“We need to go to Washington and tell them to change their funding model, to start funding cancer and not just public health,” Fochesato says. “Because cancer is an epidemic. And it’s been years; everyone lives with now.

Federal funds earmarked for cancer research are critically important, she says, but until there is a cure, there must also be patient services.

“Because once cancer patients hear this diagnosis, they don’t hear anything else,” Fochesato said. “We need to meet patients where they are and walk them through the journey so they can go from survivors to thriving.”

This story first appeared in Machias Valley News Watcher and has been republished with permission.

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Many tools available to help APPs fight nausea in children with cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/many-tools-available-to-help-apps-fight-nausea-in-children-with-cancer/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 13:21:46 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/many-tools-available-to-help-apps-fight-nausea-in-children-with-cancer/ November 02, 2022 5 minute read Source/Disclosures Published by: Disclosures: Beauchemin, Linder, Raybin and Zupanec do not report any relevant financial information. ADD A SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS Receive an email when new articles are published on Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles […]]]>

November 02, 2022

5 minute read


Disclosures: Beauchemin, Linder, Raybin and Zupanec do not report any relevant financial information.


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Nausea is one of the most common and distressing symptoms experienced by children and adolescents with cancer.

Patients and their parents report that nausea interrupts daily life at all phases of the cancer trajectory, from new diagnosis to advanced cancer and even at the end of life.



Nausea is a core symptom requiring regular evaluation in children and adolescents receiving <a class=cancer treatment. Source: Adobe Stock” class=”figure-img img-fluid” width=”800″/>
Nausea is a core symptom requiring regular evaluation in children and adolescents receiving cancer treatment. Source: Adobe Stock

Jennifer L. Raybin

Jennifer L. Raybin

Evidence is mixed, but data suggests that nausea worsens with age, as adolescents report more severe nausea and interference with daily activities compared to younger children, although younger children may not not have the language to express the concept of nausea.

Managing symptoms such as nausea is one of the primary goals of advanced practice providers, who aim to prevent and minimize negative symptoms related to cancer and its treatment. The Children’s Oncology Group (COG) and the Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON) collaborate closely to develop, share, and provide evidence-based guidance for PPAs providing supportive care in pediatric, adolescent clinical settings and young adults.

The Science of Nausea Symptoms

Nausea is a core symptom requiring regular evaluation in children and adolescents receiving cancer treatment. Collecting data directly from these young patients allows their voices to be heard, rather than relying on the perceptions of parents or caregivers.

Melissa P. Beauchemin, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC, CPON

Melissa Beauchemin

Investigators are also examining the use of electronic or mobile health apps to aid in symptom assessment in children and adolescents.

The NIH toolkit includes a recently published symptom assessment tool: Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcome Terminology Common Criteria for Adverse Events (Ped PRO-CTCAE). This resource was adapted from the adult-focused CTCAE and provides a valid and reliable approach to comparing patient-reported symptoms before and after interventions, as well as across diverse populations, across the treatment continuum. Because nausea is a prevalent and distressing symptom, interventions can and should be tested for their impact on symptom control using standardized symptom assessments.

Types of nausea

Nausea often occurs in the absence of vomiting; therefore, vomiting is not a reliable indicator of nausea. Additionally, there are several types of nausea, including chemotherapy-induced, anticipatory, disease-related, and acute or chronic, each requiring different management approaches. Uncontrolled nausea can lead to anorexia, weight loss and malnutrition and negatively impact the patient experience. The developmental stage and subjective reporting of the child or adolescent adds to the complexity of measuring nausea.

Lauri A. Linder

Lauri A. Linder

Reliable and valid tools for measuring nausea, such as the Pediatric Nausea Assessment Tool (PeNAT), are available. Emerging evidence also supports that quality of life measures can capture nausea and its relationship to overall well-being. PPAs need to be aware of these clinical tools, which could help us recognize nausea-related suffering and optimize treatment plans.

Treatment recommendations

New evidence regarding the optimal management of nausea continues to emerge. The dissemination of this information is a common objective of APHON and COG.

APHON has an evidence-based practice committee that develops symptom management practices. APHON also endorses published clinical guidelines with links to them on their website.

Within the COG, the Supportive Care Guidelines Committee includes APPs and reviews published clinical practice guidelines for approval.

APHON and COG have endorsed a published supportive care guideline for the management of nausea and vomiting (see references). Due to the complexity of nausea, the approved guideline addresses many aspects, including the prevention and treatment of acute, chronic, and anticipated nausea, as well as the levels of emetogenicity of chemotherapy regimens.

Fight against cancer and APP

APPs can be confused with the term cancer control, which focuses on supportive care and involves preventing symptoms rather than curing the disease. This area is highly relevant for APPs that manage distressing symptoms such as nausea. A unique opportunity exists for APPs to advocate or even conduct nausea management studies via COG or APHON. APPs are well suited to participate in all stages of clinical research, including protocol design, participant recruitment and consent, data collection and reporting. APPs may collaborate with physicians on cancer-focused therapeutic studies, but may find that working on cancer-fighting studies is more suited to our clinical roles. Additionally, with the shortage of clinical research coordinators, PPAs can fill a gap by helping to facilitate these studies during the daily routine care we provide.

Sue Zupanec

Sue Zupanec

PPAs should keep in mind that patients with nausea may be eligible to participate in open-label cancer control research studies investigating antiemetic strategies. Treatments in these studies often have evidence of safety and effectiveness in adults; however, more evidence is needed before they can be given to children and adolescents. This is the premise of clinical research, and APPs can help patients and their families understand the need and importance of these studies – to ultimately improve cancer care and the management of symptoms such as nausea in children and adolescents with cancer.

Conclusion

APPs will likely recognize the struggle to effectively prevent and manage nausea in patients. Even the experience of a brief viral gastrointestinal illness is a reminder of how terrible nausea is.

When trying to alleviate this suffering of children and adolescents with cancer, PPAs should turn to published guidelines for help. PPAs can also promote the search for new treatments through engagement with evidence-based practice, cancer control, and supportive care committees within the APHON or COG. Other unconventional strategies APPs can explore with multidisciplinary team support include acupuncture, aromatherapy, and medical marijuana, which have preliminary evidence of safety and efficacy for nausea control in pediatrics.

APPs have a key clinical role: to help patients manage symptoms. APPs can arm themselves with a toolbox of references, including creative and innovative ideas, to meet the needs and preferences of each patient.

Helio | HemOnc Today collaborated with the Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON) for the submission of this column.

References:

  • Beauchemin M, et al. App Clin Inform. 2021;doi:10.1055/s-0041-1728698.
  • Children’s oncology group. COG guidelines on supportive care. Available at: childrensoncologygroup.org/index.php/cog-supportive-care guidelines.
  • Dupuis LL, et al. Pharmacotherapy. 2006;doi:10.1592/phco.26.9.1221.
  • Hinds PS, et al. Pediatrician Leukemia. 2019;doi:10.1002/pbc.27606.
  • Linder LA, et al. Semin Oncol Nurses. 2015; doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2015.05.002.
  • Montgomery KE, et al. Cancer Nurses. 2020;doi:10.1097/NCC.0000000000000721.
  • Montgomery KE, et al. Nurses Outlook. 2021;doi:10.1016/j.outlook.2021.06.013.
  • Reeve BB, et al. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2020;doi:10.1093/jnci/djaa016.
  • Seelisch J, et al. Pediatrician Leukemia. 2019;doi:10.1002/pbc.27471.
  • Withycombe JS, et al. J Pediatrician Oncol Nurses. 2019;doi:10.1177/1043454219854983.
  • WolfeJ, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2015;doi:10.1200/JCO.2014.59.1222.

For more information:

Mélissa Beauchemin, PhD, RN, CPNP, CPON, is an assistant professor of nursing at Columbia University School of Nursing. She can be reached at mmp2123@cumc.columbia.edu.

Lauri A. Linder, PhD, APRN, CPON, FAAN, FAPHON, is an associate professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Utah and a clinical nurse specialist at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City. She can be contacted at lauri.linder@nurs.utah.edu.

Jennifer L. Raybin, Ph.D., RN, CPNP, is an Associate Professor of Nursing and Pediatric Hematological Oncology at Oregon Health & Science University and Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. She can be contacted at raybin@ohsu.edu.

Sue Zupanec, MN, NP, is a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Nursing Discipline Chair for the Children’s Oncology Group. She can be reached at sue.zupanec@sickkids.ca.

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RHOTI hike against breast cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/rhoti-hike-against-breast-cancer/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 20:42:00 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/rhoti-hike-against-breast-cancer/ TOPSAIL ISLAND NC – A Topsail Island group has been cycling 26.2 miles annually for the past 12 years to raise money for residents battling breast cancer. What do you want to know Reel Housewives of Topsail Island is a non-profit organization that organizes a bike ride on the island to help breast cancer patients. […]]]>

TOPSAIL ISLAND NC – A Topsail Island group has been cycling 26.2 miles annually for the past 12 years to raise money for residents battling breast cancer.


What do you want to know

  • Reel Housewives of Topsail Island is a non-profit organization that organizes a bike ride on the island to help breast cancer patients.
  • According to the American Association of Cancer Research, 47% of women have money problems because of the cost of care
  • All money raised from the bike ride goes to those in the community fighting breast cancer

The cost of breast cancer treatment adds up quickly. Renee Callahan found herself in a difficult situation because of this.

“Are you wondering how you are going to pay your bills? You have to do treatment,” Callahan said.

According to the American Association of Cancer Research, 47% of women struggle with money because of the cost of care. The organization also found the typical cost of care to be between $20,000 and $100,000.

The Reel Housewives of Topsail Island (RHOTI) came to Callahan’s rescue when they decided to take a bike ride on the island. Each runner donated $20 and they raised $2,800 and donated it to Callahan.

“I was sitting alone, I had just lost my hair. And you have a stranger call and you say they want to drive 26 miles for you,” Callahan said, describing the moment RHOTI reached out for the to help.

For the past 12 years, Callahan has continued her journey with breast cancer. RHOTI has been by his side every step of the way, even after he went into remission.

“They made me feel like I could do anything. I could fight anything,” Callahan said.

“Just other treatments, lymphedema, and she helped me with the franchises sometimes,” Callahan said of RHOTI founder Annette Erny. “She helped me buy Christmas presents for my child. She helped me in the beginning with rent or mortgage payments and other things.”

Sometimes Callahan will try to do as much of the ride as possible, but this year she felt the ride would be too hard for her. So she volunteered to cheer on participants and help with post-race activities. It’s important to Callahan to give back to the organization that has helped her so much.

“It’s just a fun thing to do and you have to give back – it feels good to do it,” Callahan said.

You can find out more about RHOTI’s mission here.

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Dendritic cell therapy in the treatment of cancer https://parentraide-cancer.org/dendritic-cell-therapy-in-the-treatment-of-cancer/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 13:02:49 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/dendritic-cell-therapy-in-the-treatment-of-cancer/ Dendritic cell therapy is a type of personalized cancer immunotherapy. Scientists create individual vaccines based on the unique tumor antigens in a particular patient. This new approach results in the destruction of tumor and metastasis, as well as the induction of immunological memory to prevent disease recurrence. Dendritic Cell Treatment is currently used in advanced […]]]>

Dendritic cell therapy is a type of personalized cancer immunotherapy. Scientists create individual vaccines based on the unique tumor antigens in a particular patient. This new approach results in the destruction of tumor and metastasis, as well as the induction of immunological memory to prevent disease recurrence. Dendritic Cell Treatment is currently used in advanced stages of cancer, giving patients extra years of life and alleviating cancer symptoms. Clinics in Germany offer comprehensive medical programs that include dendritic cell immunotherapy.

Essence of Dendritic Cell Therapy

To protect us from foreign agents, including cancer cells, the immune system must be able, first, to recognize them and, second, to destroy them. Dendritic cells are the professional agents of antigen presentation. They recognize malignant tissue, process it, and present themselves to the immune system’s T-killers as the molecular target for attack. Thus, without the scrupulous work of dendritic cells, immunity remains “blind”, and oncology develops.

Unfortunately, some tumors can hide from the immune system by masking foreign antigens and blocking the immune response. This is when vaccination against cancer is indicated.

To make the individual vaccine, doctors take up to 200 ml of the patient’s blood or, as a more advanced option, take only leukocytes using leukapheresis. After that, health specialists separate the monocytes from the harvested material; monocytes will grow further into dendritic cells.

Dendritic cells are cultured in the laboratory and “educated” to recognize the specific tumor. To do this, they are mixed with tumor tissue or a mixture of tumor antigens. Once the dendritic cells have all the necessary information, the vaccine is made. The whole process can take 7-20 days.

How does the procedure take place

Vaccination is well tolerated and in most cases is performed on an outpatient basis. The vaccine is injected into the skin or into a vein. If possible, doctors choose the site on the body that is close to the tumor and surrounding lymph nodes. Anti-inflammatory drugs and interferon can be used additionally for better results.

After the procedure, a patient remains under medical supervision for several hours. The most serious possible side effects are flu-like symptoms, headache, and redness of the skin around the injection site.

Depending on the diagnosis, different vaccination schemes are used. Typically, doctors start with 4 applications of the vaccine about 4 to 5 weeks apart. In some cases, therapy can last a long time – up to several years. It further contributes to the development of natural anti-cancer immunity.

Who Can Undergo Dendritic Cell Therapy

Treatment with dendritic cell vaccines is indicated in patients with different types of oncology, such as:

  • Brain cancer (glioblastoma)
  • Breast cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Osteosarcoma and soft tissue sarcoma
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Liver cancer
  • Colon Cancer
  • Lung cancer
  • Melanoma

Ongoing clinical trials will further clarify the efficacy and tolerance of this therapeutic technique. What we can already say is that cancer vaccines are safe and induce anticancer immunity even in people with metastatic tumors.

Hospitals and healthcare organization abroad

Individualized treatment of cancer with dendritic cells is carried out in University Hospitals, the most successful of which are:

  • University Hospital of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
  • University Hospital Frankfurt am Main
  • Würzburg University Hospital
  • Berlin Charité University Hospital
  • Ulm University Hospital

The cost of dendritic cell treatment depends on the diagnosis, number of vaccinations, and additional treatments required. For example, the cost of preliminary diagnosis, vaccination and chemotherapy for metastatic melanoma is around €25,500. You can find other rates on the Booking Health website.

As a certified international provider of medical tourism, Health Reservation will also organize your trip:

  • Help you choose a hospital and a doctor
  • Develop the preliminary medical program
  • Make an urgent appointment
  • Facilitate visa issuance
  • Pay for flight, accommodation, transfer, medical insurance
  • Control expenses, exclude additional costs
  • Provide you with an interpreter
  • And much more

Do not hesitate to contact Booking Health and start your treatment as soon as possible.

Photo by Mufid Majnun on Unsplash

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The Prostate Cancer Support Group’s annual conference will take place on November 12 https://parentraide-cancer.org/the-prostate-cancer-support-groups-annual-conference-will-take-place-on-november-12/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 20:48:57 +0000 https://parentraide-cancer.org/the-prostate-cancer-support-groups-annual-conference-will-take-place-on-november-12/ First in-person conference since 2019 Available statewide via Zoom Three of New Mexico’s most experienced physicians involved in treating the ever-changing prostate cancer landscape will speak on Saturday, November 12 at the 11e annual free conference of the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico (PCSANM). Dr Schroeder The event will be held at Immanuel […]]]>
  • First in-person conference since 2019
  • Available statewide via Zoom

Three of New Mexico’s most experienced physicians involved in treating the ever-changing prostate cancer landscape will speak on Saturday, November 12 at the 11e annual free conference of the Prostate Cancer Support Association of New Mexico (PCSANM).

Dr Schroeder

The event will be held at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 114 Carlisle Blvd. SE, 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m. This will be the first in-person conference since 2019. Anyone interested can attend in person or remotely via Zoom.

Dr. Damara Kaplan, a urologist at the New Mexico Cancer Center, will open the conference with a talk on diagnosis and staging, essentially the first steps in treating prostate cancer.

Dr. Thomas Schroeder, radiation oncologist at the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will focus on the local treatment of cancer contained in the prostate.

The final speaker, Dr. Jose Avitia, medical oncologist at New Mexico Cancer Center, will focus on cancer that has spread throughout the body and disease that comes back after initial treatment.

Additional conference details, including how to participate via Zoom, are available at www.pcsanm.org.

Dr Kaplan

Dr. Avitia

The support group office is located at 2533 Virginia St. NE, Suite C, 87110. Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please call 505-254-7786 and toll free 1-800-278-7678 for more information or assistance.

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