Limit fructose and prevent obesity, colorectal cancer

High fructose corn syrup, fructose may promote obesity and colorectal cancer. So can you just eliminate it from your diet altogether? A Maryland gastroenterologist said it was probably not practical. But there are things you can do.

High-fructose corn syrup is found in everything from bread to yogurt – and a new study suggests fructose may promote obesity and colorectal cancer.

So can you just eliminate it from your diet altogether? A Maryland gastroenterologist said it was probably not practical. But there are things you can To do.

“Getting a well-balanced diet and minimizing foods high in fructose corn syrup is your best bet,” said Dr. Dana Sloane of Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group.

Sloane, who was not involved in the study, is chief of gastroenterology at Kaiser Permanente’s South Baltimore County Medical Center.

People looking to limit fructose, she says, can focus on sodas, juices and processed baked goods, such as cakes, cookies and pies.

Dr. Dana Sloane, of the Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group, is chief of gastroenterology at Kaiser Permanente’s South Baltimore County Medical Center. (Courtesy of Kaiser Permanente)

“It’s the easiest way for most people to immediately reduce the risk of obesity and potentially certain types of cancers,” Sloane said. She added that a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher makes people about 30% more likely to develop colorectal cancer than people of normal weight.

“Beyond this, a higher BMI is also associated with increased risks of other types of cancers: esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, but also non-gastrointestinal cancers such as breast cancer. “, she said.

February is National Cancer Prevention Month, and Sloane advised people to “make sure you’re up to date with all your cancer screenings, especially colorectal cancer screening.” Colorectal cancer, on the whole, is a preventable disease if you have proper screening.

The study suggesting that excessive fructose consumption may help stimulate the growth of cancer cells in the intestines was funded in part by the National Cancer Institute. He found that mice fed diets rich in high-fructose corn syrup had an increased risk of obesity and a higher risk of tumor growth and anemia.

“They also looked, in a very nuanced way, at things like how tumor cells might behave under certain metabolic conditions influenced by high fructose corn syrup,” Sloane said. “So the reason this is all of interest is that it can shed light on why tumors behave the way they do, and the impact that diet and obesity can have on colorectal tumours.

Researchers are beginning human studies to see if similar results occur in humans, according to a statement from the National Cancer Institute.

Sloane pointed out that not all sugars are bad.

“And in fact, a lot of naturally occurring sugars such as those found in fruit are actually good for you — you get the side benefit, for example with fruit, of having extra fiber,” Sloane said.

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