Patients help researchers advance prostate cancer treatments

0

To Pie charts show the number of patients who consented and the number of primary prostate tumor samples collected for xenograft versus the number of samples that maintained tumor tissue in the first generation (G1) PDX and established as transplantable in series (ST) PDX. The color indicates the site from which each sample was taken. b – d Percentage of Ki67-positive tumor cells in pre-grafted tissue (b; n = 14 ST, 38 non ST), time to first generation (c; n = 14 ST, 49 non ST) and tumor volume during surgery for radical prostatectomy (RP; orange) and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP; purple) specimens (d; n = 13 ST, 28 non ST, P = 0.016) which established ST PDX by compared to those who did not. Two-tailed unpaired T test for ST vs. non-ST; data shown as mean ± SEM. e The percentage of primary tumors with a Gleason grade group of 1 to 5 that established (n = 13) or did not establish ST PDX (n = 30; not significant, Mann Whitney test comparing the distribution of Gleason grade between ST vs non ST). f Kaplan-Meier curve comparing survival of patients whose RP sample established (orange; n = 13) or did not have (blue; n = 37) PDX STs. p = 0.0072; log-rank test; HR = 10.93; 95% CI 1.51 to 79.08. g The pie charts show the number of consented patients and the number of metastatic tumor samples collected for xenograft versus the number of samples that maintained tumor tissue in the G1 PDX and established as serial transplantable PDX. The color indicates the site from which each sample was taken. h – i The percentage of Ki67-positive tumor cells in the pre-grafted tissue (h; n = 25 ST, 94 non ST, P j The percentage of androgen receptor (AR) positive and negative metastatic tumors that established (n = 25) or did not establish ST PDX (n = 80), based on immunohistochemistry for RA in tissue tumor of origin. Insignificant; Fisher’s exact test. Source data is provided as a source data file. Credit: DOI: 10.1038 / s41467-021-25175-5 “width =” 800 “height =” 530 “/>

Pathological and clinical characteristics of tumors used to establish PDXs. a Pie charts show the number of patients who consented and the number of primary prostate tumor samples collected for xenograft versus the number of samples that maintained tumor tissue in the first generation (G1) PDX and established as serial transplantable PDXs (ST). The color indicates the site from which each sample was taken. b – d The percentage of Ki67-positive tumor cells in the pre-grafted tissue (b; n = 14 ST, 38 non ST), time to first generation (c; n = 14 ST, 49 non ST) and volume tumor during surgery for samples of prostatectomy (RP; orange) and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP; purple) (d; n = 13 ST, 28 non ST, P = 0.016) which established PDX ST compared to to those who haven’t. Two-tailed unpaired T test for ST vs. non-ST; data shown as mean ± SEM. e The percentage of primary tumors with a Gleason grade group of 1 to 5 that established (n = 13) or did not establish ST PDX (n = 30; not significant, Mann Whitney test comparing the distribution of groups of Gleason grade between ST vs non ST). F Kaplan-Meier curve comparing survival of patients whose RP sample established (orange; n = 13) or did not have (blue; n = 37) PDX STs. p = 0.0072; log-rank test; HR = 10.93; 95% CI 1.51 to 79.08. g Pie charts show the number of consented patients and the number of metastatic tumor samples collected for xenograft versus the number of samples that maintained tumor tissue in the G1 PDX and established as serial transplantable PDX. The color indicates the site from which each sample was taken. Hello The percentage of Ki67-positive tumor cells in the pre-grafted tissue (h; n = 25 ST, 94 non-ST, P j The percentage of metastatic tumors positive for the androgen receptor (AR) and AR-negative which have it did (n = 25) or did not establish ST PDX (n = 80), based on immunohistochemistry for RA in original tumor tissue. Not significant; Fisher’s exact test. Source data are provided as a source data file Credit: DOI: 10.1038 / s41467-021- 25175-5

Monash University researchers have created one of the world’s largest collections of live tumors from prostate cancer patients, accelerating testing of new treatments for prostate cancer and resulting in greater benefit. fast for patients.

One of the most common cancers, prostate cancer is also one of the most difficult to study in the laboratory, with frequently used models derived more than 40 years ago. With the establishment of the Melbourne Urological Research Alliance (MURAL), hundreds of Victorian men generously donated samples of their cancerous tissue, allowing the team to study a greater diversity of living tumors and test the effectiveness of a wider variety of therapies for their ability to stop tumor growth.

The PDX (patient-derived xenografts) collection, developed by a multidisciplinary consortium and led by Professor Gail Risbridger and Associate Professor Renea Taylor at the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), now includes 59 tumors, collected from 30 patients between 2012- 2020 and today is one of the largest collections of prostate cancer models in the world.

The full characterization of the PDX collection is published in Nature Communication.

MURAL PDXs are a sustainable resource of novel cancer models that can be shared with other academic researchers or pharmaceutical companies. Patients and their families are directly integrated into this endeavor, including the EJ Whitten Foundation which has played a pivotal role over the past 10 years by providing over $ 1 million in donations allowing this resource to grow and sustain. program to be at the forefront of the international community. field.

“This project begins and ends with patients like EJ Whitten. We take tissue from patients – do laboratory tests – and the findings then advance the treatment of patients,” said Professor Risbridger. “Our new models of prostate cancer have aroused the interest of scientists and the pharmaceutical industry around the world.”

Ted Whitten, Executive Director and Founder of the EJWhitten Foundation, congratulates the Monash University Biomedicine Discovery Institute for its recent findings in prostate cancer research. “We believe Monash University is a leader in prostate cancer research and we are delighted to have been able to financially support many of their important programs over the past ten years.”

Dr Mitchell Lawrence, also of Monash BDI and lead author, says: “This resource provides the opportunity to link molecular changes in prostate cancer to pathology, to cultivate organoids, and to test functional responses to therapies, which have rarely been applied to prostate cancer. given the lack of suitable models. ”


Experts unite to eradicate prostate cancer


More information:
Gail P. Risbridger et al, The MURAL collection of xenografts derived from prostate cancer patients enables discovery through preclinical models of uro-oncology, Nature Communication (2021). DOI: 10.1038 / s41467-021-25175-5

Provided by Monash University

Quote: Patients Helping Researchers Advance Prostate Cancer Treatments (2021, 23 Aug) Retrieved 23 Aug 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-08-patients-advance-treatments-prostate-cancer .html

This document is subject to copyright. Other than fair use for private study or research purposes, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.