UC Cancer Center research aims to provide more treatment options for patients

A diagnosis of cancer is a sad reality. According to the American Cancer Society, one in two men and one in three women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. But all is not black. Local research is underway to improve treatment plans, and you can even contribute to research efforts. Inside Dr. Trisha Wise-Draper’s lab at the University of Cincinnati, there’s more than cutting-edge research. Hope is on. “Science is growing and exploding right now,” Wise-Draper said. Those kinds of stories are really important to be able to bring them into the field of cancer and take them to the next level,” she said. Take a recent trial at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York. A dozen patients with a type of rectal cancer were treated with a form of immunotherapy. The result: 100% remission in every patient. Dr. Davendra Sohal is associate director of clinical research at the UC Cancer Center and an expert in immunotherapy. “Honestly, no one expected such a wonderful result,” he said. “It basically boosts the body’s immune system and makes it fight cancer,” Sohal said. Wise-Draper recently used it in a head and neck cancer trial, which showed promising results. According to medical experts, immunotherapy and another form of treatment called cell therapy are considered more targeted against cancer. This means it might have less impact on your body as a whole. “Every therapy can potentially have side effects, but the more we target the cancer, the less likely you are to have systemic effects,” Wise-Draper said. We asked Wise-Draper if she saw a future without something as toxic as chemotherapy. “I hope so,” she said. Imagining a future like this is possible thanks to clinical trials funded not only by the federal government, but also by community events like Ride Cincinnati. Sohal will swap his lab coat for a bike helmet on race day. “Every dollar raised goes to cancer research. Cancer research can only be funded through one or the other stream. We need all streams,” he said. “We can’t continue cancer care without Ride Cincinnati,” Wise-Draper said.

A diagnosis of cancer is a sad reality.

According to the American Cancer Society, one in two men and one in three women will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime.

But all is not black. Local research is underway to improve treatment plans, and you can even contribute to research efforts.

Inside Dr. Trisha Wise-Draper’s lab at the University of Cincinnati, there’s more than cutting-edge research. Hope is on.

“Science is growing and exploding right now,” Wise-Draper said.

“I have a patient who has a glioblastoma that’s normally, you know, 2-5% five-year survival. He’s seven years away from a phase 1 trial. Those kinds of stories are really important to be able to bring in the field of cancer and take them to the next step,” she said.

Take a recent trial at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York. A dozen patients with a type of rectal cancer were treated with a form of immunotherapy. The result: 100% remission in every patient.

Dr. Davendra Sohal is associate director of clinical research at the UC Cancer Center and an expert in immunotherapy.

“Honestly, no one expected such a wonderful result,” he said.

“It basically boosts the body’s immune system and makes it fight cancer,” Sohal said.

Wise-Draper recently used it in a head and neck cancer trial, which showed promising results. According to medical experts, immunotherapy and another form of treatment called cell therapy are considered more targeted against cancer. This means it might have less impact on your body as a whole.

“Every therapy can potentially have side effects, but the more we target the cancer, the less likely you are to have systemic effects,” Wise-Draper said.

We asked Wise-Draper if she saw a future without something as toxic as chemotherapy.

“I hope so,” she said.

Imagining a future like this is possible thanks to clinical trials funded not only by the federal government, but also by community events like Ride Cincinnati.

Sohal will swap his lab coat for a bike helmet on race day.

“Every dollar raised goes to cancer research. Cancer research can only be funded through one or the other stream. We need all streams,” he said.

“We can’t continue cancer care without Ride Cincinnati,” Wise-Draper said.

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